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Podcast Podcast Podcast  [cached]
Paul Nightingale,Sergio Diez de Medina
Journal of technology management & innovation , 2006,
Abstract: The following podcast shows an interview in mp3 format made to Dr. Paul Nightingle, Senior Fellow and Senior Lecturer from SPRU-Freeman Centre (University of Sussex- United Kingdom), Visitor Lecturer in the course Technology Change Management, from the Technology Management Master Degree (Universidad de Talca-Chile). In this occasion Dr. Nightingale answers some questions from Sergio Diez de Medina, JOTMI Managing Editor, discussing the role of policies in science, technology and innovation. El siguiente podcast muestra una entrevista en formato mp3 hecha al Dr. Paul Nightingale, Senior Fellow y Senior Lecturer del SPRU-Freeman Centre (Universidad de Sussex- Reino Unido), Profesor Invitado del curso de Gestión del Cambio Tecnológico del Magíster de Gestión Tecnológica (Universidad de Talca-Chile). En ésta ocasión el Dr. Nightingale responde algunas preguntas de Sergio Diez de Medina, Managing Editor de JOTMI, discutiendo temas del rol de las políticas en ciencia, tecnología e innovación. The following podcast shows an interview in mp3 format made to Dr. Paul Nightingle, Senior Fellow and Senior Lecturer from SPRU-Freeman Centre (University of Sussex- United Kingdom), Visitor Lecturer in the course Technology Change Management, from the Technology Management Master Degree (Universidad de Talca-Chile). In this occasion Dr. Nightingale answers some questions from Sergio Diez de Medina, JOTMI Managing Editor, discussing the role of policies in science, technology and innovation.
The Gap between Mind and World in Mind and World Remains  [PDF]
Chung-I. Lin
Open Journal of Philosophy (OJPP) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2013.32044
Abstract: In Mind and World, McDowell endorses: empirical thoughts should be justified, ultimately, by things they are about; and, that empirical thoughts are immediately about their ultimate justifiers. But, it also holds two other views: first, as we relate our empirical judgments to their credentials, we ultimately rely on experience, despite its fallibility; second, our empirical judgments are about things in the external world. These views appear inconsistent with one another. McDowell’s way of accommodating the seeming inconsistency appeals to the idea of conceptuality of experience and the holism of the conceptual. Mainly by an argument from false experience, I demonstrate that the conceptual resources relevant to McDowell’s idea of the conceptuality of experience fall short of delivering the accommodation he promises.
The Mind-Reading Wizards  [cached]
Peter J. Bentley
Opticon1826 , 2008, DOI: 10.5334/opt.040802
Abstract: Telepathy was once nothing more than a parlour trick played by illusionists to entertain us. Names would seemingly be pulled out of our heads, numbers would be correctly guessed, our hiding places revealed. It was all done through trickery – reading our body language, tone of voice, and movement of eyes. Magic doesn’t really exist, and neither did mind-reading. At least that used to be true, until the mind-reading wizards arrived. Now something resembling telepathy is becoming a reliable reality. Being poker-faced will not help you any more. Even if you control every movement of your muscles or flicker of your eyes, you will never hide your brain activity. The magic word is not abracadabra, but Hex-o-Spell!
Science via podcast
Ilenia Picardi,Simona Regina
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2008,
Abstract: Internet and the new media have been dramatically affecting the communication scenario. They are changing the role played by traditional media in the information processes, are creating new public spaces for dialogue and participation, and are triggering a short circuit among those producing and those receiving information. Even science communication is not stranger to the changes brought about by the new way of using and populating the web. An epitome of this process of change is the scientific podcast. This article will provide a brief review on the spreading and the purposes of podcasts in science communication, coming from a survey implemented as an activity of the course Science via podcast addressed to the second-year students of the Master in Science Communication of SISSA of Trieste.
Podcast som eksamenform  [cached]
Anja M?lle Lindelof
L?ring og Medier , 2011,
Abstract: I efter ret 2010 indgik podcast-produktion som en del af eksamen i kurset “Analyse og dokumentation” p Performance-design, RUC. Fors get udsprang af en grundl ggende interesse for at inddrage digital teknologi i undervisningen og et nske om at udforske mulighederne i eksamensformen ’aktiv deltagelse’. N rv rende artikel diskuteres baggrunden for og evalueringen af fors get for dels at bidrage med konkrete erfaringer og dels at illustrere de mange fordele ved at lave s danne fors g, som tager udgangspunkt i et nske om at inddrage digital teknologi i undervisningen p en m de, som kan kombinere faglige og p dagogiske ambitioner med pragmatiske hensyn.
Bridging the gap between philosophers of mind and brain researchers: The example of addiction  [cached]
Perring Christian
Mens Sana Monographs , 2011,
Abstract: Philosophers and psychologists have long tried to understand people′s irrational behaviour through concepts such as weakness of will, compulsion and addiction. The scientific basis of the project has been greatly enhanced by advances in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. However, some philosophers have also been critical of the more general conclusions drawn by the scientists. This is especially true when scientific researchers start making claims that go to philosophical issues, such as free will and responsibility. Conversely, some scientists have been critical of philosophical approaches for not understanding the results of recent research. I examined some of the recent history of scientific claims about addiction, and the rise of the claims from scientists to have shown that addiction is a brain disease and that addictive behaviour is compulsive. Given the well-confirmed evidence that addicts can modulate their behaviour in response to rewards, punishments and context, it is clear that according to normal definitions of compulsivity the behaviour of addicts is not typically compulsive, suggesting that neuroscientists are making an error in their interpretation of data. Since philosophers have expertise in making distinctions between different kinds of action and categorising them as free, weak-willed and compulsive, we will achieve a better interpretation of the neuroscience of addiction when taking this philosophical work into account. Conversely, given the status of science in the modern world, philosophers have to grapple with the latest neuroscientific discoveries and show the compatibility of their philosophical theories with the data for their approaches to maintain credibility.
Bridging the gap between philosophers of mind and brain researchers: The example of addiction  [cached]
Christian Perring
Mens Sana Monographs , 2011,
Abstract: Philosophers and psychologists have long tried to understand people's irrational behaviour through concepts such as weakness of will, compulsion and addiction. The scientific basis of the project has been greatly enhanced by advances in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. However, some philosophers have also been critical of the more general conclusions drawn by the scientists. This is especially true when scientific researchers start making claims that go to philosophical issues, such as free will and responsibility. Conversely, some scientists have been critical of philosophical approaches for not understanding the results of recent research. I examined some of the recent history of scientific claims about addiction, and the rise of the claims from scientists to have shown that addiction is a brain disease and that addictive behaviour is compulsive. Given the well-confirmed evidence that addicts can modulate their behaviour in response to rewards, punishments and context, it is clear that according to normal definitions of compulsivity the behaviour of addicts is not typically compulsive, suggesting that neuroscientists are making an error in their interpretation of data. Since philosophers have expertise in making distinctions between different kinds of action and categorising them as free, weak-willed and compulsive, we will achieve a better interpretation of the neuroscience of addiction when taking this philosophical work into account. Conversely, given the status of science in the modern world, philosophers have to grapple with the latest neuroscientific discoveries and show the compatibility of their philosophical theories with the data for their approaches to maintain credibility.
‘Expanding your mind’: the process of constructing gender-equitable masculinities in young Nicaraguan men participating in reproductive health or gender training programs  [cached]
Virgilio Mariano Salazar Torres,Isabel Goicolea,Kerstin Edin,Ann ?hman
Global Health Action , 2012, DOI: 10.3402/gha.v5i0.17262
Abstract: Background: Traditional forms of masculinity strongly influence men's and women's wellbeing. Objective: This study has two aims: (i) to explore notions of various forms of masculinities in young Nicaraguan men participating in programs addressing sexual health, reproductive health, and/or gender equality and (ii) to find out how these young men perceive their involvement in actions aimed at reducing violence against women (VAW). Design: A qualitative grounded theory study. Data were collected through six focus groups and two in-depth interviews with altogether 62 young men. Results: Our analysis showed that the informants experienced a process of change, labeled ‘Expanding your mind’, in which we identified four interrelated subcategories: The apprentice, The responsible/respectful man, The proactive peer educator, and ‘The feminist man’. The process showed how an increased awareness of gender inequities facilitated the emergence of values (respect and responsibility) and behavior (thoughtful action) that contributed to increase the informant's critical thinking and agency at individual, social, and political levels. The process was influenced by individual and external factors. Conclusions: Multiple progressive masculinities can emerge from programs challenging patriarchy in this Latin American setting. The masculinities identified in this study show a range of attitudes and behaviors; however, all lean toward more equitable gender relations. The results suggest that learning about sexual and reproductive health does not directly imply developing more gender-equitable attitudes and behaviors or a greater willingness to prevent VAW. It is paramount that interventions to challenge machismo in this setting continue and are expanded to reach more young men.
Mind the Gap!  [PDF]
Antonio Lazcano
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000122
Abstract:
Mind the Gap!  [PDF]
Antonio Lazcano
PLOS Biology , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000122
Abstract:
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