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IMPACT OF THE FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT FROM THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR ON THE ROMANIAN IMPORTS OF INTERMEDIATE GOODS AND OF RAW MATERIALS
RAMONA DUMITRIU,R?ZVAN ?TEF?NESCU,COSTEL NISTOR
Annals of the University of Petrosani : Economics , 2010,
Abstract: Increasing exports by stimulating the foreign direct investment could be a solution to the problem of the persistent trade balance deficit of Romania. However, in such an attempt there have to be taken into consideration the potential effects of the foreign direct investment on some categories of imports. This paper explores the dynamic relation between the foreign direct investment from the manufacturing sector and the Romanian imports of intermediate goods and raw materials. We found causality linkages between the foreign direct investment and the imports of intermediate goods, meaning that Romanian branches of the multinational companies prefer to import such goods instead of producing or buying from the domestic markets. Instead, we failed to identify any causality between the foreign direct investment and the imports of raw materials.
Antidumping Petition, Foreign Direct Investment, and Strategic Exports  [cached]
Yasukazu Ichino
Research in World Economy , 2013, DOI: 10.5430/rwe.v4n1p22
Abstract: We examine how the protection-seeking effort of an import-competing industry, in the form of an antidumping petition, is affected by the foreign firm’s FDI opportunity. In equilibrium, the protection-seeking effort is either blockading, deterring, or accommodating FDI. When FDI is deterred, the protection-seeking effort decreases as the antidumping duty increases, and the foreign firm can benefit from an increase in the duty. Therefore, when the future duty depends on current exports, the foreign firm may increase its exports in order to dampen protection seeking. Namely, antidumping policy can induce more “dumping” when the foreign firm has an FDI opportunity.
Causal Links between Foreign Direct Investment and Exports: Evidence from Malaysia
Siti Hajar Samsu,Alias Mat Derus,Ai-Yee Ooi,Mohd Fahmi Ghazali
International Journal of Business and Management , 2009, DOI: 10.5539/ijbm.v3n12p177
Abstract: Malaysia has encouraged foreign investment not only for its role in technology transfer but also for its contribution to Malaysian exports. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate empirically the causal relationship between FDI inflows and exports in Malaysia. The methodologies of stationarity of time series and the multivariate Granger concept of causality were employed to carry out the investigation. The finding that time series variables are cointegrated implies that there is a long term relationship between them. The results appear to support the effectiveness of the outward looking orientation policy deployed in this country.
Regional Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Manufacturing Industry  [cached]
Kelly Liu,Kevin Daly,Maria Estela Varua
International Journal of Economics and Finance , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/ijef.v4n12p178
Abstract: Since China opened its economy to foreign investment in 1979, it has become the second largest Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) destination in the world after the USA. Over the past three decades, the manufacturing sector has dominated China’s FDI inflow, however, when manufacturing activity is bifurcated into low and high technology classes, it becomes evident that China is in a transition stage, moving from FDI in traditional low-tech manufacturing activity to a high-tech manufacturing environment. This paper attempts to analyse the key determinants of FDI inflow across low and high technology manufacturing industry across the four geographical regions of China. In the paper we empirically investigate the determinants of FDI inflows to both high and low-tech manufacturing industries by market size, labor cost, labor quality, and government spending on human capita.
The Effect of Foreign Direct Investment on the Nigerian Manufacturing Sector  [cached]
Opaluwa David,Ameh. A. Abu,Alabi J. O.,Abdul Mohammed
International Business and Management , 2012, DOI: 10.3968/j.ibm.1923842820120402.1075
Abstract: This study examined the effect of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on the Nigerian manufacturing sector spanning 1975 – 2008. Nigeria has embarked on several policy measures aimed at enhancing the manufacturing sector’s productivity coupled with the inflow of FDI to the country. The controversy is that the policy makers are not convinced that the potential benefits of FDI could be fully realized. The methodology adopted for the study is the Vector Auto Regression (VAR), co-integration and error correction techniques to establish the relationship between FDI and the growth of manufacturing sector. The findings from the study show that FDI has a negative effect on the manufacturing productivity and is statistically significant. Arising from the findings, it is recommended that government should create an enabling environment for foreign investment and the monitoring of FDI benefits, with particular focus of NEPAD and NEEDS through the instrumentality of the MDGs; thereby mustering the capacity for sustainable growth in the manufacturing sector. Key words: FDI; Manufacturing sector; Productivity; Growth, Policy
Foreign Direct Investment and Manufacturing Growth: The Malaysian Experience  [cached]
V G R Chandran,Gopi Krishnan
International Business Research , 2009, DOI: 10.5539/ibr.v1n3p83
Abstract: This paper examines the short and long run dynamics of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) over the manufacturing growth in a developing country – Malaysia for the period of 1970-2003. Due to the small sample size, we used a fairly new cointegration method known as "bounds test" and the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach to estimate the short and long run production elasticity of FDI. Estimated FDI elasticity in the short and long run were found to be statistically significant. In the long run, a 1% increase in FDI contributes to 0.115% increase in manufacturing value added output in Malaysia. The model extracts the influence of FDI and technological progress towards manufacturing output. As a consequence of the results, strategies to enhance the competitiveness of Malaysian manufacturing sectors in the world of intense competition for FDI especially among the Asian economies like China and other ASEAN members is further recommended.
Exports, Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth: An Empirical Application for Nigeria  [cached]
Sikiru Jimoh BABALOLA,Shehu Dan Hassan DOGON-DAJI,Jimoh Olakunle SAKA
International Journal of Economics and Finance , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/ijef.v4n4p95
Abstract: The paper examines the relationship among exports, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and economic growth in Nigeria over the period 1960-2009. The time series properties of the variables are examined using the Phillips-Peron technique due to its robustness to a wide variety of serial correlation and heteroscedasticity. The results of Johansen cointegration test indicate existence of at least six cointegrating vectors. The error correction coefficient shows that deviation from long run RGDP path is corrected by about 48% over the following year. As a way of correcting for multicollinearity, we re-estimate the models of the static regression using a Fully Modified Least Squares Method (FMOLS) and error correction coefficient. We find out that the removal of Degree of openness (DOP) variable may be detrimental even though the percentage deviation from equilibrium does not seem to change. The paper therefore concludes by shedding more light on the relevance of the degree of openness and this can facilitate more FDI inflows capable of accelerating the growth process. The paper thus recommends immediate focus on more reforms/policies that will create enabling environment for FDI inflows and export growth thereby reducing the growth and development barriers in Nigeria.
Foreign Direct Investment in China Manufacturing Industry –Transformation from a Low Tech to High Tech Manufacturing  [cached]
Kelly Liu,Kevin Daly
International Journal of Business and Management , 2011, DOI: 10.5539/ijbm.v6n7p15
Abstract: Since China opened its economy to foreign investment in 1979, it has become the second largest Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) destination in the world after USA. Over the period 1997 to 2008, the manufacturing sector has dominated China’s FDI inflow, however, when manufacturing activity is bifurcated into low and high technology classes, it becomes evident that China is in a transition stage moving from FDI in traditional low-tech activity to a high-tech manufacturing environment. This paper attempts to summarise and explain the key determinants of FDI inflow across low and high technology manufacturing industry across three geographical regions of China. In the paper we empirically investigate the determinants of FDI high-low tech inflow by market size, labour cost, labour quality, and infrastructure. We also investigate the theoretical foundations for China’s transition from a low tech to a high tech manufacturing environment.
Productivity Spillovers and Foreign Direct Investment in the Greek Manufacturing Industry  [cached]
John Mylonakis
Journal of Management Research , 2009, DOI: 10.5296/jmr.v1i2.47
Abstract: Firms expand their production abroad if they possess some knowledge-based assets, which, acting as a joint input across plants, give rise to scale economies at the firm level. The scope of this paper is to examine the role of foreign presence in enhancing efficiency, testing first the hypothesis that the ownership structure adopted by the MNFs causes different productivity shifts. Then, productivity spillovers are analyzed and their relationship to the ownership structure is also explored. The research was based on a 4056 manufacturing firms (3840 domestic and 216 foreign affiliates). Research found that the higher the degree of foreign ownership, the more efficient production is. Also, productivity is affected by the existence of financial constraints. Spillovers stemming from foreign affiliates were found most important for the domestic economy, benefiting domestic firms and especially the lower productivity local firms.This finding challenges theory that the degree of foreign involvement does not matter.
Foreign Direct Investment and Manufacturing Growth: The Case of Tax Incentives in Puerto Rico  [PDF]
Wilfredo Toledo
Modern Economy (ME) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/me.2017.82019
Abstract: The aim of this paper was to determine the effects that the end of tax incentive for U.S. firms operating in Puerto Rico had on the growth trend of the manufacturing sector in the island. It was found evidence that the termination of these incentives diminished manufacturing employment growth trend. This reduction was transmitted to Puerto Rico’s aggregate real output. Real GNP declined at an average rate of 1.7% per year from 2007 to 2015. Thus, it may be argued that foreign capital may stimulate economic growth in the short run, but that increase may be artificial without local means to be maintained in the long run.
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