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Theodor Kocher (1841-1917) Nobel Prize Centenary 2009
Kopp, Peter;
Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia & Metabologia , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S0004-27302009000900015
Abstract: one hundred years ago, in 1909, theodor kocher was awarded the nobel prize in physiology and medicine for his work on the physiology, pathology, and surgery of the thyroid gland. in the late 19th century, the resection of the thyroid was feared because of its high mortality rate. kocher's innovative techniques resulted in safe outcomes. his observations that radical resection of the thyroid results in "cachexia strumipriva" contributed to the recognition that the thyroid is essential for normal growth, development and metabolism. he made many other seminal contributions to the field of surgery and medicine, and his expertise was internationally recognized. kocher served as the chairman of surgery at the university of bern in switzerland, his alma mater, until his death in 1917.
Emil Theodor Kocher: an innovator surgeon
Franco,María Liliana; Acosta,Natalia; Chuaire,Lilian;
Colombia Médica , 2009,
Abstract: emil theodor kocher is considered along with frank lahey, theodor billroth, william halsted, charles mayo, george crile and thomas dunhill as one of the ?magnificent seven?, referring to the group of surgeons who managed thyroidectomy to make it a safe and efficient intervention that it is now practiced throughout the world. he was author of numerous contributions towards medicine. one of his most important contributions was to elucidate the function of the thyroid gland, through the observation and study of thyroidectomyzed patients, for which he was recognized by the academic and scientific community during the early twentieth century.
Emil Theodor Kocher: an innovator surgeon
María Liliana Franco,Natalia Acosta,Lilian Chuaire
Colombia Médica , 2009,
Abstract: Emil Theodor Kocher is considered along with Frank Lahey, Theodor Billroth, William Halsted, Charles Mayo, George Crile and Thomas Dunhill as one of the Magnificent Seven , referring to the group of surgeons who managed thyroidectomy to make it a safe and efficient intervention that it is now practiced throughout the world. He was author of numerous contributions towards medicine. One of his most important contributions was to elucidate the function of the thyroid gland, through the observation and study of thyroidectomyzed patients, for which he was recognized by the academic and scientific community during the early twentieth century.
THEODOR KOCHER AND THYROID SURGERY  [PDF]
V. STRAT
Jurnalul de Chirurgie , 2008,
Abstract:
Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Substitution: Historical Aspects  [PDF]
J. Lindholm,P. Laurberg
Journal of Thyroid Research , 2011, DOI: 10.4061/2011/809341
Abstract: The last part of the 19th century was a period of great achievements in medicine and endocrinology. The thyroid gland evolved from being considered a rudimentary structure to an organ related to specific diseases. The singular importance of iodine became acknowledged. Graves-Basedow's disease was described. Surgical treatment evolved with extraordinary speed. Theodor Kocher observed that the clinical picture in patients after total thyroidectomy was similar to the one seen in cretinism. In 1850, the first case of hypothyroidism or myxedema was described. Less than 50 years later, effective treatment was introduced. Another 50 years later, autoimmune thyroiditis was ascertained as the most frequent cause of hypothyroidism (in areas with no iodine deficiency). This paper gives a short survey of the history of hypothyroidism and its treatment. 1. Introduction During the 50 years preceding World War I, medicine saw a wealth of new ideas and novel procedures, not in the least within the field of endocrinology. Among major achievements of this period were the recognition of the importance of the pituitary gland, first suggested by Oscar Minkowski (1858–1931) [1] and introduction of pituitary surgery [2]—not only for pituitary tumors but also as treatment of acromegaly [3]; the delineation of hypopituitarism as a nosological entity [4]; the discovery in 1877 (by a medical student) of the parathyroid glands [5] and recognition of their vital importance [6]; introduction of thyroid surgery, pioneered by Rehn [7], Theodor Billroth [8] and above all Theodor Kocher (1841–1917) [9]; Minkowski’s demonstration that pancreatectomy swiftly leads to severe diabetes mellitus [10]. Halban [11] and Knauer [12] performed important experiments demonstrating that chemical substances controlling menstruations were released from the ovary. Similarly, Reinke [13] and Bouin and Ancel [14] proposed that testis was a gland with internal secretion—studies that were the vanguard of an impressive number of investigations on the relationship between the pituitary and the gonads [15]. The first hormone was synthesized (adrenaline or epinephrine) by Jokichi Takamine (1854–1922) in 1901 [16]. What was probably the supreme feat of the epoch took place on January 16, 1902 when William Bayliss (1860–1924) and Ernest Henry Starling (1866–1927) for the first time UK witnessed the effect of a substance later to be identified as a hormone (secretin) [17]. There was virtually no endocrine organ that did not become object of intensive investigation. It became clear that diseases of the thyroid
Nobel Leptons  [PDF]
K. V. L. Sarma
Physics , 1995,
Abstract: The 1995 Nobel Prize in Physics is shared equally by the American physicists Frederick J. Reines and Martin L. Perl for their pioneering experimental contributions to lepton physics. Following is a brief account of their discoveries.
Premios Nobel  [cached]
Fernández Santarén, Juan
Arbor : Ciencia, Pensamiento y Cultura , 2002,
Abstract: Not available Todos los a os alrededor del 10 de diciembre, aniversario de la muerte de Alfred Nobel, Estocolmo y Oslo se convierten en centro del mayor evento científico y literario: los Premios Nobel, el galardón que recompensa los logros de excelenecia en los campos de la Física, la Química, la Medicina y la Literatura, así como el Premio de la Paz. Se han cumplido ya cien a os de su primera concesión y es momento de retrotraernos en el tiempo para recordar algunos rasgos biográficos y personales de Alfred Nobel, su fundador. Y es momento igualmente de evocar la compleja y difícil andadura que hubo que recorrer para dar forma legal a las ideas que Nobel había expresado en su testamento, organizar la Fundación Nobel y a partir de ahí, iniciar la concesión de los premios.
Kocher Debre Semelaigne Syndrome: A Rare Case Report with Orofacial Manifestations
Sunil R. Panat,Prakash Chandra Jha,Sangamesh N. Chinnannavar,Ankkita Chakarvarty
Oman Medical Journal , 2013,
Abstract: Kocher Debre Semelaigne Syndrome is a rare syndrome with clinical manifestation of hypothyroidism associated with pseudomuscular hypertrophy. Very few cases have been reported on kocher-debre semelaigne syndrome in the literature with the incidence reported to be less than 10%. As per our knowledge; until now, only one case of oro-facial manifestations has been reported. Here we report one such case of Kocher debre semelaigne syndrome in an 11 year old boy, showing features of macroglossia, multiple impacted teeth, puffed lips and anterior open bite.
Words for Nobel prizes  [PDF]
J. M. Moran-Mirabal,H. C. Rosu
Physics , 2002,
Abstract: We present the statistics of the significant nouns and adjectives of social impact figuring in the nominations of the Nobel prizes in Physics and Chemistry over the period of the awards from 1901 to 2001
Theodor Seebold (1832?-1915)  [cached]
A. Vives
SHILAP Revista de Lepidopterología , 2004,
Abstract: Presentamos por primera vez, una biografía del entomólogo alemán Theodor Seebold, cuya aportación al conocimiento de los Lepidoptera en Espa a durante el siglo diecinueve fue muy importante
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