oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure
Cardoso Jr, Crivaldo Gomes;Gomides, Ricardo Saraceni;Queiroz, Andréia Cristiane Carrenho;Pinto, Luiz Gustavo;Lobo, Fernando da Silveira;Tinucci, Tais;Mion Jr, Décio;Forjaz, Claudia Lucia de Moraes;
Clinics , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S1807-59322010000300013
Abstract: hypertension is a ubiquitous and serious disease. regular exercise has been recommended as a strategy for the prevention and treatment of hypertension because of its effects in reducing clinical blood pressure; however, ambulatory blood pressure is a better predictor of target-organ damage than clinical blood pressure, and therefore studying the effects of exercise on ambulatory blood pressure is important as well. moreover, different kinds of exercise might produce distinct effects that might differ between normotensive and hypertensive subjects. the aim of this study was to review the current literature on the acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. it has been conclusively shown that a single episode of aerobic exercise reduces ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients. similarly, regular aerobic training also decreases ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals. in contrast, data on the effects of resistance exercise is both scarce and controversial. nevertheless, studies suggest that resistance exercise might acutely decrease ambulatory blood pressure after exercise, and that this effect seems to be greater after low-intensity exercise and in patients receiving anti-hypertensive drugs. on the other hand, only two studies investigating resistance training in hypertensive patients have been conducted, and neither has demonstrated any hypotensive effect. thus, based on current knowledge, aerobic training should be recommended to decrease ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, while resistance exercise could be prescribed as a complementary strategy.
Critical speed as a predictor of aerobic performance in children
Italo Quenni Araujo de Vasconcelos,Luís Paulo Gomes Mascarenhas,Anderson Zampier Ulbrich,Antonio Stabelini Neto
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria e Desempenho Humano , 2007,
Abstract: To compare times achieved in a 1,600m rural road run with the times predicted from critical speed, in additionto verify any association between critical speed and VO2max with the aerobic performance (1,600m time) of children. The sample consisted of 25 boys and 39 girls, aged 9 to 11 years. Their critical speeds were determined using the work versus time model, performed in the 200m and 800m maximum runs. The value of VO2max was measured using a 20-meter shuttlerun test. Endurance performance was determinate from the time obtained in a rural 1,600m road run. Statistical proceduresused were descriptive analyses, Student’s t test and Pearson’s moment correlation, with signifi cance level set at p<0.05. The times achieved for aerobic performance were significantly lower than the performance predicted from critical speed, forboth sexes (males: 8.43 ± 0.78 min versus 10.16 ± 1.37 min; females: 9.09 ± 0.75 min versus 10.30 ± 1.09 min) (p=0.0001). Significant inverse relationships were observed between critical speed and aerobic performance for both subsets (males:r= -0.52; females: r= -0.70), and between VO2max and aerobic performance in the case of females (r= -0.48). In this study critical speed was not shown to be a predictor of performance in a 1,600m road run. However, the significant correlationsobserved suggest that critical speed could be used as a tool to control endurance training in children. RESUMO O estudo teve como objetivo comparar o tempo obtido na prova de 1.600m com o tempo predito pela velocidade crítica, bem como verifi car a associa o da velocidade crítica e da potência aeróbia (VO2máx) com o desempenho aeróbio (tempo 1.600m) em crian as. A amostra foi composta de 25 meninos e 39 meninas, com faixa etária entre 9 a 11 anos, classifi cadas nos estágios de matura o sexual 1 e 2 de Tanner. A velocidade crítica foi obtida pelo modelo de avalia o trabalho versus tempo, na realiza o de dois tiros máximos de 200m e 800m. O VO2máx foi obtido através do teste de vai-vem de 20m. O desempenho aeróbio foi obtido através do tempo de percurso em uma prova rústica de 1.600m. Utilizou-se a estatística descritiva, teste “t” student e a correla o de Pearson, adotando p<0,05. Em ambos os grupos, odesempenho obtido na prova de 1.600m foi significativamente menor que o desempenho predito pela velocidade crítica (masculino: 8,43 ± 0,78 min versus 10,16 ± 1,37 min; feminino: 9,09 ± 0,75 min versus 10,30 ± 1,09 min) (p= 0,0001).Observaram-se correla es inversamente significativas entre a velocidade crítica e o desempenho aeróbio nos grupos masculino e femi
Acute aerobic exercise reduces 24-h ambulatory blood pressure levels in long-term-treated hypertensive patients
Ciolac, Emmanuel G.;Guimar?es, Guilherme V.;D′ávila, Veridiana M.;Bortolotto, Luiz A.;Doria, Egídio L.;Bocchi, Edimar A.;
Clinics , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1807-59322008000600008
Abstract: background: even with anti-hypertensive therapy, it is difficult to maintain optimal systemic blood pressure values in hypertensive patients. exercise may reduce blood pressure in untreated hypertensive, but its effect when combined with long-term anti-hypertensive therapy remains unclear. our purpose was to evaluate the acute effects of a single session of aerobic exercise on the blood pressure of long-term-treated hypertensive patients. methods: fifty treated hypertensive patients (18/32 male/female; 46.5±8.2 years; body mass index: 27.8±4.7 kg/m2) were monitored for 24 h with respect to ambulatory (a) blood pressure after an aerobic exercise session (post-exercise) and a control period (control) in random order. aerobic exercise consisted of 40 minutes on a cycle-ergometer, with the mean exercise intensity at 60% of the patient's reserve heart rate. results: post-exercise ambulatory blood pressure was reduced for 24 h systolic (126±8.6 vs. 123.1±8.7 mmhg, p=0.004) and diastolic blood pressure (81.9±8 vs. 79.8±8.5 mmhg, p=0.004), daytime diastolic blood pressure (85.5±8.5 vs. 83.9±8.8 mmhg, p=0.04), and nighttime s (116.8±9.9 vs. 112.5±9.2 mmhg, p<0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (73.5±8.8 vs. 70.1±8.4 mmhg, p<0.001). post-exercise daytime systolic blood pressure also tended to be reduced (129.8±9.3 vs. 127.8±9.4 mmhg, p=0.06). these post-exercise decreases in ambulatory blood pressure increased the percentage of patients displaying normal 24h systolic blood pressure (58% vs. 76%, p=0.007), daytime systolic blood pressure (68% vs. 82%, p=0.02), and nighttime diastolic blood pressure (56% vs. 72%, p=0.02). nighttime systolic blood pressure also tended to increase (58% vs. 80%, p=0.058). conclusion: a single bout of aerobic exercise reduced 24h ambulatory blood pressure levels in long-term-treated hypertensive patients and increased the percentage of patients reaching normal ambulatory blood pressure values. these effects suggest that aerobic exercise may have a
Time of day has no effect on maximal aerobic and peak power
Bessot N, Moussay S, Dufour B, Davenne D, Sesboüé B, Gauthier A
ChronoPhysiology and Therapy , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CPT.S20345
Abstract: f day has no effect on maximal aerobic and peak power Original Research (1961) Total Article Views Authors: Bessot N, Moussay S, Dufour B, Davenne D, Sesboüé B, Gauthier A Published Date August 2011 Volume 2011:1 Pages 11 - 16 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CPT.S20345 N Bessot1,3, S Moussay1,2, B Dufour1,2, D Davenne1,2, B Sesboüé1,3, A Gauthier1,2 1Inserm, ERI27, Caen, France; 2University Caen, Caen, France; 3CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, France Background: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of time of day on peak power reached during an exercise test and maximal aerobic power achieved when the subject reached maximal oxygen uptake. Methods: Fifteen male competitive endurance cyclists performed a standardized maximal incremental exercise test at 06:00 hours and 18:00 hours. The test began with a 5-minute warmup period at a workload of 150 W. The work rate was then increased by incremental steps of 30 W per minute until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.00. Thereafter, workload was increased in steps of 15 W per minute until exhaustion was reached. Results: No significant diurnal variation was detected in physiological parameters (maximal oxygen uptake and maximal heart rate) or biomechanical parameters (maximal aerobic power, peak power). Conclusion: Circadian variations classically reported in competitive aerobic performances could be due to fluctuations in maximal aerobic endurance and/or improvement in gestural efficiency (pattern of muscle activity, effective force production, and kinematics).
Time of day has no effect on maximal aerobic and peak power  [cached]
Bessot N,Moussay S,Dufour B,Davenne D
ChronoPhysiology and Therapy , 2011,
Abstract: N Bessot1,3, S Moussay1,2, B Dufour1,2, D Davenne1,2, B Sesboüé1,3, A Gauthier1,21Inserm, ERI27, Caen, France; 2University Caen, Caen, France; 3CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, FranceBackground: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of time of day on peak power reached during an exercise test and maximal aerobic power achieved when the subject reached maximal oxygen uptake.Methods: Fifteen male competitive endurance cyclists performed a standardized maximal incremental exercise test at 06:00 hours and 18:00 hours. The test began with a 5-minute warmup period at a workload of 150 W. The work rate was then increased by incremental steps of 30 W per minute until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.00. Thereafter, workload was increased in steps of 15 W per minute until exhaustion was reached.Results: No significant diurnal variation was detected in physiological parameters (maximal oxygen uptake and maximal heart rate) or biomechanical parameters (maximal aerobic power, peak power).Conclusion: Circadian variations classically reported in competitive aerobic performances could be due to fluctuations in maximal aerobic endurance and/or improvement in gestural efficiency (pattern of muscle activity, effective force production, and kinematics).Keywords: chronobiology, maximal aerobic power, peak power, maximal oxygen uptake, maximal incremental test
Effect of aerobic exercise training on peak expiratory flow rate: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial  [PDF]
Chaitra B , Vijay Maitri
International Journal of Biological and Medical Research , 2011,
Abstract: ABSTRCT Background Aerobic exercise is an important component of pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There are few studies on aerobic exercise and pulmonary function in general population. This study was carried out to explore the effect of aerobics on pulmonary function in general population. Aim To evaluate the effect of aerobic exercise training on Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) in healthy volunteers. Methods We recruited eighty, apparently healthy medical students of either sex, aged 17-20 years. Randomisation into experimental and control groups (40 each), was carried out with a table of random numbers. Experimental group participated in a 16 weeks aerobic exercise plan (five 20 minute sessions of jogging in a week), while control group had no plan of exercise during that period of time. PEFR was recorded by computerised spirometer, before the commencement of training and at the end of 4 months in both the groups. Student’s paired‘t’ test (2 tail) was applied to compare the pre and post training values of both the groups. Statistics were tested at the p<0.05 level of significance and data were reported as mean±standard deviation. Results At baseline, PEFR (L/min) values of experimental and control group were 437.8±64 (mean±S.D.) and 429.7±53 respectively. After 4 months of aerobics training, the PEFR values in experimental and control groups were 512.9±62 (P=0.007), and 431.5±59 (P=0.491) respectively. There was 17% improvement in PEFR in experimental group after the training. Conclusion We conclude that aerobic exercise training leads to improvement in pulmonary function in healthy subjects; and thus provides further support for the aerobic exercise being an important component of pulmonary rehabilitation. The health care community should better recognize aerobics as a complement to conventional medical care; thus lead to better and improved treatments of COPD.
Home-Based Aerobic Interval Training Improves Peak Oxygen Uptake Equal to Residential Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial  [PDF]
Trine Moholdt, Mona Bekken Vold, Jostein Grimsmo, Stig Arild Sl?rdahl, Ulrik Wisl?ff
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0041199
Abstract: Aerobic capacity, measured as the peak oxygen uptake, is a strong predictor of survival in cardiac patients. Aerobic interval training (AIT), walking/running four times four minutes at 85–95% of peak heart rate, has proven to be effective in increasing peak oxygen uptake in coronary heart disease patients. As some patients do not attend organized rehabilitation programs, home-based exercise should be an alternative. We investigated whether AIT could be performed effectively at home, and compared the effects on peak oxygen uptake with that observed after a standard care, four-week residential rehabilitation. Thirty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized to residential rehabilitation or home-based AIT. At six months follow-up, peak oxygen uptake increased 4.6 (±2.7) and 3.9 (±3.6) mL·kg?1 min?1 (both p<0.005, non-significant between-group difference) after residential rehabilitation and AIT, respectively. Quality of life increased significantly in both groups, with no statistical significant difference between groups. We found no evidence for a different treatment effect between patients randomized to home-based AIT compared to patients attending organized rehabilitation (95% confidence interval ?1.8, 3.5). AIT patients reported good adherence to exercise training. Even though these first data indicate positive effects of home-based AIT in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, more studies are needed to provide supporting evidence for the application of this rehabilitation strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00363922
Age-graded reductions in quadriceps muscle strength and peak aerobic capacity in COPD
Spruit, Martijn A.;Franssen, Frits M. E.;Rutten, Erica P. A.;Wagers, Scott S.;Wouters, Emiel F. M.;
Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-35552012005000011
Abstract: background: reductions in quadriceps strength and peak aerobic capacity (vo2) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (copd) have been studied in relatively small samples over a short period. moreover, results were not corrected for confounding variables, such as lean muscle mass, gender, and gas transfer capacity of the lungs. objectives: to compare quadriceps muscle strength and peak v.o2 in women and men while stratifying for age and gas transfer capacity. we then corrected for lower-limb lean muscle mass to see whether and to what extent the age-graded reduction remained evident. methods: retrospectively, data of 374 women and 593 men with copd were analyzed: lung function, current drug therapy, quadriceps strength, peak v.o2, lower-limb lean muscle mass, and gas transfer capacity. results: quadriceps strength and peak v.o2 were lower in older women and men with a gas transfer capacity of <50% predicted, also after adjustment for lower-limb lean muscle mass. moreover, quadriceps strength and peak v.o2 were lower in older women and men with a gas transfer capacity of <50% predicted, also after adjustment for lower-limb lean muscle mass. moreover, quadriceps strength and peak v.o2 were related to age in copd, particularly in women and men with a gas transfer capacity of >50% predicted. yet, counter to our hypothesis, lower-limb lean muscle mass did not show an age-graded reduction and, in turn, could not account for the relationship of age with quadriceps strength and peak v.o2. conclusions: it is apparent that there is an age-graded reduction in skeletal muscle function in patients with copd. therefore, prevention of an age-graded decline in quadriceps muscle strength and peak v.o2 may need to become an outcome of pulmonary rehabilitation of patients with copd.
Effect of Aerobic Training on Heart Rate Recovery in Patients with Established Heart Disease; a Systematic Review  [PDF]
Johan A. Snoek, Sietske van Berkel, Nico van Meeteren, Frank J. G. Backx, Hein A. M. Daanen
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083907
Abstract: Background Although a delayed decrease in heart rate during the first minute after graded exercise has been identified as a powerful predictor of overall mortality in cardiac patients, the potential to influence this risk factor by aerobic training remains to be proven. Objective The aim was to study the relationship between aerobic training and Heart Rate Recovery (HRR) in patients with established heart disease. Methods (Quasi) randomized clinical trials on aerobic exercise training in adults with established heart disease were identified through electronic database and reference screening. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias and therapeutic validity. Methodological validity was evaluated using an adapted version of the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias and the therapeutic validity of the interventions was assessed with a nine-itemed, expert-based rating scale (CONTENT). Scores range from 0 to 9 (score ≥ 6 reflecting therapeutic validity). Results Of the 384 articles retrieved, 8 studies (449 patients) were included. Three of the included studies demonstrated adequate therapeutic validity and five demonstrated low risk of bias. Two studies showed both adequate therapeutic validity and a low risk of bias. For cardiac patients aerobic exercise training was associated with more improvement in HRR compared to usual care. Conclusion The present systematic review shows a level 1A evidence that aerobic training increases HRR in patients with established heart disease.
Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery
Juan Vi?oles, Maía V Ibá?ez, Guillermo Ayala
BMC Health Services Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-11-269
Abstract: The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction.A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain) were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI). This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient.Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all responses except for sleep at the first call.The variable ambulatory surgical incapacity proved to be a good predictor of the patient's status at home. These predictions could be used to assist in educating patients and their carers about what to expect after discharge, as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction.Ambulatory Surgery (AS) is a routine clinical practice. In recent years, more complex operations have been included in am
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.