oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Plan Recognition in Stories and in Life  [PDF]
Eugene Charniak,Robert P. Goldman
Computer Science , 2013,
Abstract: Plan recognition does not work the same way in stories and in "real life" (people tend to jump to conclusions more in stories). We present a theory of this, for the particular case of how objects in stories (or in life) influence plan recognition decisions. We provide a Bayesian network formalization of a simple first-order theory of plans, and show how a particular network parameter seems to govern the difference between "life-like" and "story-like" response. We then show why this parameter would be influenced (in the desired way) by a model of speaker (or author) topic selection which assumes that facts in stories are typically "relevant".
Life Stories – research notes and reflections
Meneghel, Stela
Athenea Digital , 2007,
Abstract: This article considers life stories and autobiographical narratives as research instruments. It explains the life story method and its possible uses in the field of public health. It includes comments and reflections based on the author’s experiences as she did research on the life stories of women, families and individuals in vulnerable situations. The author argues that the life story method, as well as the narratives, enables both the narrator and the researcher to reconstruct their experiences and to the reinterpret the meaning of what happened.
APPLE: MEDICINE OF ETERNAL LIFE / LüMSüZLüK IL CI ELMA
Prof. Dr. Esma ??M?EK
Turkish Studies , 2008,
Abstract: Apple which is a medicinal fruit has an importantplace in Turkish culture. It is a symbol of abundance,fertility, eternal life, youth, beauty, strength, health, loveand faith. Apple features in myths, stories, tales, customsand beliefs. This study surveys the place of apple inmarriage, funeral, passage rites, folk medicine, learning alanguage, eternal life.
The Structures of Meaningful Life Stories
Owen Flanagan
Gerais : Revista Interinstitucional de Psicologia , 2008,
Abstract: Life’s meaning is a matter of how we live in this life. Whatever meaning a life has for the creature whose life itis ends when bodily death occurs. When someone dies the meaning of their life is over for them, in first person.But the meaning of a life for others, for those in relation with the dead person, does not end when a person dies.Our lives, be they good or bad, leave effects, ripples – memories – on others who are different because of us,and future generations who will feel the effects of our being – certainly after long enough time, without everknowing that we existed. This is all the meaning we can reasonably expect a human life to have. But manypeople think that this much meaning is not enough, that for life to be truly meaningful there must be somethingthat makes for eternal or transcendent meaning.
Youth, creativity and urban life: insights from classics
Frederick kang'ethe Iraki
Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa , 2011,
Abstract: Youth and leadership appear to be antinomical concepts in modern Kenya. Similarly, youth on one side, and creativity and entrepreneurship on the other appear to be strange bed-fellows. The youth are quasi-synonymous with want of leadership, intellectual dullness, indolence, over-reliance on parents and teachers, and lack of enterprise. This phenomenon stands in stark contrast with traditional African ethos and social mores. In traditional African setting, the role of the youth was well defined and demarcated. The youth represented that tranche of age between childhood and adulthood. It symbolized the preparation to assume family and community responsibility. Invariably, it was heralded by a rite of passage. Subsequently, the youth were initiated into various chores and codes of behavior to prime them to take over leadership roles. These included warriors, raiders, elders to adjudicate over disputes, etc. With the advent of urbanization, traditional African life mutates rapidly as the pressure of modern life redefines social roles and responsibilities. The youth is faced with a conflict of cultures, urban poverty, parental neglect, and lack of a social compass to direct their lives. In response to these iniquities, the youth devise strategies, linguistic or otherwise, to cope with this seemingly indifferent and oppressive urban context. This paper attempts to discuss the condition of the youth in Nairobi with a view to documenting the challenges they face and strategies that could help them cope (or overcome) some of the daunting hardships put in their way by the imperatives of a fast uncoordinated mutations of the City. The paper draws inspiration from outstanding authors who have successfully tackled the issue of personal economic prosperity and self-reliance. Success begins with the individual, not society.
Between Work and Nonwork: Precarious Transitions through Life Stories and Everyday Life  [cached]
Annalisa Murgia
Narrative Works , 2012,
Abstract: This paper analyzes critical transitions in work careers and the methodological implications with regard to the study of risk biographies. It analyzes contemporary work trajectories taking into account a variety of fields and spheres of life that are articulated in different ways, events, perceptions, and representations that inspire people’s action. From a methodological perspective, the paper concentrates on the development and implementation of methods for the narrative analysis of biographical transitions. The criteria used for the risk biographies analysis assume that the actor is a sense-maker who thoughtfully and retrospectively interprets the shifts and the events of his/her life, defining their coherence with his/her own principles. Moreover, a narrative approach enables both a longitudinal analysis of the biographical transitions in life stories and the analysis of everyday transitions among paid work, unpaid work, and private life.
Special Education Teachers Life Stories: Subjectivity and Education  [PDF]
Marlene Rozek, Claus Dieter Stob?us
Creative Education (CE) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2017.812133
Abstract: This article is about study of subjectivity and the teacher education process of students with special needs, intending?to?understand the movements and paths of the personal and professional formation process of the subject-teacher, as well as the productions of meaning that configure teaching with students who present a diagnosis of special needs, as intellectual deficiency and/or multiple deficiency, associated or not with psychic disorders. Considering that human subjectivity is characterized by the production of meanings, the present study points to the understanding of the subjective senses attributed to the different experiences lived in the context of teaching with students with disabilities. It was intended to produce, through the understanding, analysis and argumentation, effects of meaning that make it possible to advance the understanding of the complex field of teacher education in Inclusive Education. The research was based on the Narrative-Life Stories approach of two teachers of the State Public School System of Porto Alegre-RS city, with a long teaching experience in Special Education, whose biographic trajectories were interpreted in the light of the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. That is, we sought to understand the discursive horizons that constitute the teacher of students with disabilities and, thus, life stories were understood from four categories: dialogue, otherness, experience and the construction of oneself. They seek to discuss the horizons they demarcate and constitute the training path of the teachers. In this way, it becomes possible to think philosophically the teacher’s formation, seeking to give a singular look/sense to the concept of formation, because it is considered fundamental to understand how the subject-teacher is constructing and configuring his existence as a teacher of students with disabilities. This understanding of teaching as a relationship experience can allow the quest for the know-how to live with oneself and with the other.
Impact of Advertisement on the Life Style of Pakistani Youth  [PDF]
Usman Daud,Umer Farooq,Faiza Anwar
Interdisciplinary Journal of Research in Business , 2011,
Abstract: Objective of this Study was to access to the role of the TV advertisement in changing the life style of Pakistani youth with the help of the habits, attitudes, tastes, moral standards parameter. And also to measure to which extent advertisement is useful in changing the life style and its impact on society. It was a community-based analytical study, undertaken from March to June 2011. A group of 200 respondents takes part in the study out of which 141 were female, 61 were male, and data was collected from different universities of Lahore. In results, male and female both point out that the advertisement is changing lifestyle and variable associated with lifestyle by far of its limit and can be problematic of our society.
Displaced girls’ participation in local youth life
Niklas Stoerup Agerup
Forced Migration Review , 2012,
Abstract: Despite related cultural practices and a shared language, IDP girls inDRC are finding it difficult to be accepted by local youth.
La construcción de una subcultura de lo juvenil: el surgimiento del teenager / The construction of a subculture of the youth: the emerge of “teenager”  [PDF]
Andrea Jarabo Torrijos
Tejuelo : Didáctica de la Lengua y la Literatura , 2012,
Abstract: Resumen: Este trabajo pretende situar históricamente el surgimiento del teenager o de la subcultura de lo juvenil como un proceso situado en un contexto determinado. La posición teórica que subyace a esta afirmación es la conceptualización de la edad como algo que se construye socialmente. El grupo social del teenager sería el resultado de la interacción de un sistema comunicativo (cine y música) y un sistema social (posguerra de la II Guerra Mundial en EEUU). Estos dos contextos tienen una relación dialéctica que influye tanto en los relatos comunicativos como en los valores y formas de vida de un determinado grupo social. Abstract: This work tries to locate historically the emergence of “teenager” or the subculture of the youth as a process located in a certain context. The theoretical position that underlies this affirmation is the conceptualization of the age as something socially constructed. The social group of teenager would be the result of the interaction between a communicative (cinema and music) and social (II World War's postwar period in the U.S.) systems. Those two contexts have a dialectic relation, which influences both in the communicative stories and in the values and forms of life of a particular social group.Abstract: This work tries to locate historically the emergence of “teenager” or the subculture of the youth as a process located in a certain context. The theoretical position that underlies this affirmation is the conceptualization of the age as something socially constructed. The social group of teenager would be the result of the interaction between a communicative (cinema and music) and social (II World War's postwar period in the U.S.) systems. Those two contexts have a dialectic relation, which influences both in the communicative stories and in the values and forms of life of a particular social group.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.