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Assessment of the cardiovascular effects of electroconvulsive therapy in individuals older than 50 years
Takada, J.Y.;Solimene, M.C.;da Luz, P.L.;Grupi, C.J.;Giorgi, D.M.A.;Rigonatti, S.P.;Rumi, D.O.;Gowdak, L.H.W.;Ramires, J.A.F.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2005, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2005000900009
Abstract: to evaluate the impact of electroconvulsive therapy on arterial blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and the occurrence of ischemia or arrhythmias, 38 (18 men) depressive patients free from systemic diseases, 50 to 83 years old (mean: 64.7 ± 8.6) underwent electroconvulsive therapy. all patients were studied with simultaneous 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and holter monitoring, starting 18 h before and continuing for 3 h after electroconvulsive therapy. blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, arrhythmias, and ischemic episodes were recorded. before each session of electroconvulsive therapy, blood pressure and heart rate were in the normal range; supraventricular ectopic beats occurred in all patients and ventricular ectopic beats in 27/38; 2 patients had non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. after shock, systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure increased 29, 25, and 24% (p < 0.001), respectively, and returned to baseline values within 1 h. maximum, mean and minimum heart rate increased 56, 52, and 49% (p < 0.001), respectively, followed by a significant decrease within 5 min; heart rate gradually increased again thereafter and remained elevated for 1 h. analysis of heart rate variability showed increased sympathetic activity during shock with a decrease in both sympathetic and parasympathetic drive afterwards. no serious adverse effects occurred; electroconvulsive therapy did not trigger any malignant arrhythmias or ischemia. in middle-aged and elderly people free from systemic diseases, electroconvulsive therapy caused transitory increases in blood pressure and heart rate and a decrease in heart rate variability but these changes were not associated with serious adverse clinical events.
Assessment of the cardiovascular effects of electroconvulsive therapy in individuals older than 50 years  [cached]
Takada J.Y.,Solimene M.C.,da Luz P.L.,Grupi C.J.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2005,
Abstract: To evaluate the impact of electroconvulsive therapy on arterial blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and the occurrence of ischemia or arrhythmias, 38 (18 men) depressive patients free from systemic diseases, 50 to 83 years old (mean: 64.7 ± 8.6) underwent electroconvulsive therapy. All patients were studied with simultaneous 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and Holter monitoring, starting 18 h before and continuing for 3 h after electroconvulsive therapy. Blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, arrhythmias, and ischemic episodes were recorded. Before each session of electroconvulsive therapy, blood pressure and heart rate were in the normal range; supraventricular ectopic beats occurred in all patients and ventricular ectopic beats in 27/38; 2 patients had non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. After shock, systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure increased 29, 25, and 24% (P < 0.001), respectively, and returned to baseline values within 1 h. Maximum, mean and minimum heart rate increased 56, 52, and 49% (P < 0.001), respectively, followed by a significant decrease within 5 min; heart rate gradually increased again thereafter and remained elevated for 1 h. Analysis of heart rate variability showed increased sympathetic activity during shock with a decrease in both sympathetic and parasympathetic drive afterwards. No serious adverse effects occurred; electroconvulsive therapy did not trigger any malignant arrhythmias or ischemia. In middle-aged and elderly people free from systemic diseases, electroconvulsive therapy caused transitory increases in blood pressure and heart rate and a decrease in heart rate variability but these changes were not associated with serious adverse clinical events.
Preface  [cached]
editor support
International Journal of Science and Engineering , 2011, DOI: 10.12777/ijse.v2i2.1309
Abstract: Preface
Long space missions, gene therapy, and the vital role of magnesium: a three-pronged plan for the next 50 years
William J Rowe
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJNRD.S13032
Abstract: ng space missions, gene therapy, and the vital role of magnesium: a three-pronged plan for the next 50 years Commentary (7212) Total Article Views Authors: William J Rowe Published Date September 2010 Volume 2010:3 Pages 123 - 127 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJNRD.S13032 William J Rowe Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Since pharmaceuticals cannot be used in space until liver and kidney dysfunctions are corrected, and with invariable malabsorption, it appears there is no alternative other than to use subcutaneous magnesium (Mg) replacements in the presence of deficiencies and use of gene therapy. I suggest beginning with the correction of as many as four gene deficiencies: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and erythropoietin (EPO), all as well as Mg related perfusion and angiogenesis. There is no evidence of significant lunar radiation levels in the absence of a solar storm. It could then be determined whether this has resulted in correction of liver and kidney dysfunction. If this persists, serial additions of gene therapy will be required determining the effect of each individual gene trial on organ function. Microgravity and endothelial gaps with leaks trigger reduced plasma volume. Partial correction by use of a plasma volume substitute and development of a delivery device may reduce complexity of gene therapy. Research would be conducted both on Earth and in microgravity, with the development of subcutaneous pharmaceuticals and Mg, and a space walk-reliable subcutaneous silicon device, given that no replenishable subcutaneous device is presently available. A three-pronged approach provides a plan for the next 50 years: A. complete correction of a Mg deficit; B. partial replacement with plasma volume substitutes, and C. multiple gene factor strategy.
Long space missions, gene therapy, and the vital role of magnesium: a three-pronged plan for the next 50 years  [cached]
William J Rowe
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease , 2010,
Abstract: William J RoweMedical University of Ohio, Toledo, OH, USAAbstract: Since pharmaceuticals cannot be used in space until liver and kidney dysfunctions are corrected, and with invariable malabsorption, it appears there is no alternative other than to use subcutaneous magnesium (Mg) replacements in the presence of deficiencies and use of gene therapy. I suggest beginning with the correction of as many as four gene deficiencies: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and erythropoietin (EPO), all as well as Mg related perfusion and angiogenesis. There is no evidence of significant lunar radiation levels in the absence of a solar storm. It could then be determined whether this has resulted in correction of liver and kidney dysfunction. If this persists, serial additions of gene therapy will be required determining the effect of each individual gene trial on organ function. Microgravity and endothelial gaps with leaks trigger reduced plasma volume. Partial correction by use of a plasma volume substitute and development of a delivery device may reduce complexity of gene therapy. Research would be conducted both on Earth and in microgravity, with the development of subcutaneous pharmaceuticals and Mg, and a space walk-reliable subcutaneous silicon device, given that no replenishable subcutaneous device is presently available. A three-pronged approach provides a plan for the next 50 years: A. complete correction of a Mg deficit; B. partial replacement with plasma volume substitutes, and C. multiple gene factor strategy.Keywords: malabsorption, gene therapy, kidneys, liver, magnesium, microgravity, space flight
Preface  [cached]
Martin Paul Eve,Samuel Thomas,Doug Haynes,Simon de Bourcier
Orbit : Writing Around Pynchon , 2012,
Abstract: Preface to Orbit 1.1.
Management of Nonpregnant Women with Elevated Human Chorionic Gonadotropin  [PDF]
Bernd C. Schmid,Aimee Reilly,Martin K. Oehler
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/580709
Abstract: Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is useful in evaluating and monitoring early pregnancy as well as trophoblastic disease. Here we describe the management of women with elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin in a case of a 51-year-old female who was unsuccessfully treated for ectopic pregnancy. She was subsequently diagnosed with pituitary hCG production, which should be considered as differential diagnosis before treatment is initiated. 1. Short Communication A 51-year-old parous woman presented with a history of intermittent pelvic cramps and vaginal spotting after two years of amenorrhoea following insertion of an etonogestrel implant for contraception. She was found to have an elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin (total β hCG (hCG + hCGβ)) measured via a quantitative electrochemiluminescence immunoassay “ECLIA” recognizing the holo-hormone, “nicked” forms of hCG, the β-core fragment, and the free β-subunit (Elecsys free β-hCG, Roche Diagnostics, Germany). Several measurements were performed and total β hCG levels of 16.2 to 32.8?IU/L were detected. To exclude a missed abortion, dilatation and curettage were done but the histology excluded any pregnancy products showing secretory endometrium and a benign endometrial polyp. Ectopic pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) was not identified by subsequent CT scans [1]. To exclude phantom or false positive hCG results caused by unspecific binding of heterophilic serum antibodies, urine hCG was measured and found to be positive [2]. Furthermore heterophilic blocking tube (Scantibodies Laboratory, Inc., USA) pretreatment of the serum samples was performed, and the results were the same as in the original assay [3]. As the clinical picture was consistent with an unidentified ectopic pregnancy, the patient was commenced on methotrexate 50?mg/m2 intramuscularly [4]. However, the serum total β hCG remained elevated. As pregnancy, GTD, and ovarian neoplasia had been excluded, another differential diagnosis was pituitary hCG production [5]. The patient’s hormone status was therefore assessed and a follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) of 60.2?U/L (reference intervals: follicular phase 3.5–12.5?U/L, luteal phase 1.5–8.0?U/L, postmenopausal 25–135?U/L) showed postmenopausal levels [6]. To suppress pituitary hCG production the patient was placed on a combined oestrogen-progesterone hormone replacement therapy and after two weeks the serum hCG levels were found to be normal, measuring <2.0?IU/L on serial testing. 2. Discussion Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a heterodimeric
PREFACE  [cached]
Christa Van der Walt
Per Linguam : A Journal of Language Learning , 2012, DOI: 10.5785/28-1-115
Abstract: Preface to Per Linguam 28(1)
50 Years of Neutrino Physics  [PDF]
Marek Zralek
Physics , 2010,
Abstract: Some important topics from history of neutrino physics over the last fifty years are discussed. History of neutrinos is older, at 4th December 2010 it will be eightieth anniversary of the "neutrino birth". In that day W. Pauli wrote the famous letter to participants of the physics conference at Tubingen with the suggestion that "there could exist in the nuclei electrically neutral particle". We will concentrate mostly on the 50 years of neutrino history just to show the long tradition of the Zakopane Theoretical School.
Preface
eXPRESS Polymer Letters , 2010, DOI: 10.3144/expresspolymlett.2010.57
Abstract: Editorial, Preface of Special Issue devoted to 10th Brazilian Polymer Congress
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