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Why Teach Music Well and Language Badly in China?
Mario Rinvolucri
Humanising Language Teaching , 2010, DOI: 17559715
Abstract:
Why Can't We Be Friends? Using Music to Teach Social Justice  [cached]
Denise L. Levy, Ph.D., LCSW,Daniel C. Byrd
The Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning , 2011,
Abstract:
How and Why to Teach Interdisciplinary Research Practice  [cached]
Rick Szostak
Journal of Research Practice , 2007,
Abstract: This article addresses the interrelated questions of why it is important to teach students about the nature of interdisciplinarity and how this material might be best communicated to students. It is important to define for students what is meant by disciplines and interdisciplinarity. Having distinguished interdisciplinarity from the disciplinary approach, the advantages and disadvantages of each can be discussed. It is useful to discuss the history of both disciplines and interdisciplinarity. It is also useful to discuss the complex relationship between interdisciplinarity and other intellectual currents: postmodernism, unity of science, complexity analysis, feminism, and others. Critically, students should be guided as to how interdisciplinary research might be best performed. Some potential objections to teaching interdisciplinary research practice are addressed.
Choosing to Teach Music: Reflections of Elementary Music Teachers in Vancouver and Hong Kong  [cached]
Marina W. Wong
Asian Social Science , 2009, DOI: 10.5539/ass.v4n2p45
Abstract: This qualitative multiple-case study explores elementary schools music teachers’ career choice in Vancouver and Hong Kong. Face-to-face open-ended interviews were used for collecting data. The results of this study demonstrated the long-term processes of social learning of music teachers that contributed to their development of personal musical interests to become a teacher. Teachers of the Vancouver cases and Hong Kong cases made their choices according to job opportunities and training opportunities respectively. The factors that had contributed to these teachers’ musical interests were very similar; but the crucial factors that had determined their choice of occupation differed remarkably. The socio-cultural differences of the two societies had noticeable influences on these elementary music teachers’ choice of occupation.
Why we should teach the Bohr model and how to teach it effectively
S. B. McKagan,K. K. Perkins,C. E. Wieman
Physical Review Special Topics. Physics Education Research , 2008,
Abstract: Some education researchers have claimed that we should not teach the Bohr model of the atom because it inhibits students’ ability to learn the true quantum nature of electrons in atoms. Although the evidence for this claim is weak, many have accepted it. This claim has implications for how to present atoms in classes ranging from elementary school to graduate school. We present results from a study designed to test this claim by developing a curriculum on models of the atom, including the Bohr and Schr dinger models. We examine student descriptions of atoms on final exams in transformed modern physics classes using various versions of this curriculum. We find that if the curriculum does not include sufficient connections between different models, many students still have a Bohr-like view of atoms rather than a more accurate Schr dinger model. However, with an improved curriculum designed to develop model-building skills and with better integration between different models, it is possible to get most students to describe atoms using the Schr dinger model. In comparing our results with previous research, we find that comparing and contrasting different models is a key feature of a curriculum that helps students move beyond the Bohr model and adopt Schr dinger’s view of the atom. We find that understanding the reasons for the development of models is much more difficult for students than understanding the features of the models. We also present interactive computer simulations designed to help students build models of the atom more effectively.
Why we should teach the Bohr model and how to teach it effectively  [PDF]
S. B. McKagan,K. K. Perkins,C. E. Wieman
Physics , 2007, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.4.010103
Abstract: Some education researchers have claimed that we should not teach the Bohr model of the atom because it inhibits students' ability to learn the true quantum nature of electrons in atoms. Although the evidence for this claim is weak, many have accepted it. This claim has implications for how to present atoms in classes ranging from elementary school to graduate school. We present results from a study designed to test this claim by developing a curriculum on models of the atom, including the Bohr and Schrodinger models. We examine student descriptions of atoms on final exams in transformed modern physics classes using various versions of this curriculum. We find that if the curriculum does not include sufficient connections between different models, many students still have a Bohr-like view of atoms, rather than a more accurate Schrodinger model. However, with an improved curriculum designed to develop model-building skills and with better integration between different models, it is possible to get most students to describe atoms using the Schrodinger model. In comparing our results with previous research, we find that comparing and contrasting different models is a key feature of a curriculum that helps students move beyond the Bohr model and adopt Schrodinger's view of the atom. We find that understanding the reasons for the development of models is much more difficult for students than understanding the features of the models. We also present interactive computer simulations designed to help students build models of the atom more effectively.
Instrumentational complexity of music genres and why simplicity sells  [PDF]
Gamaliel Percino,Peter Klimek,Stefan Thurner
Computer Science , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0115255
Abstract: Listening habits are strongly influenced by two opposing aspects, the desire for variety and the demand for uniformity in music. In this work we quantify these two notions in terms of musical instrumentation and production technologies that are typically involved in crafting popular music. We assign a "complexity value" to each music style. A style is complex if it shows the property of having both high variety and low uniformity in instrumentation. We find a strong inverse relation between variety and uniformity of music styles that is remarkably stable over the last half century. Individual styles, however, show dramatic changes in their "complexity" during that period. Styles like "new wave" or "disco" quickly climbed towards higher complexity in the 70s and fell back to low complexity levels shortly afterwards, whereas styles like "folk rock" remained at constant high complexity levels. We show that changes in the complexity of a style are related to its number of sales and to the number of artists contributing to that style. As a style attracts a growing number of artists, its instrumentational variety usually increases. At the same time the instrumentational uniformity of a style decreases, i.e. a unique stylistic and increasingly complex expression pattern emerges. In contrast, album sales of a given style typically increase with decreasing complexity. This can be interpreted as music becoming increasingly formulaic once commercial or mainstream success sets in.
Why Provide Music Therapy in the Community for Adults With Mental Health Problems?  [cached]
Helen Odell-Miller
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2005,
Abstract: This paper describes music therapy within a community mental health setting for adults using a care programme approach in England. It describes the setting, and emphasises the importance of multidisciplinary teamwork in order to enable music therapy to be effective. It provides some statistics and descriptive clinical information which demonstrate the efficacy of music therapy for adults with long-term mental health problems, and argues that music therapy should be a priority for this client group. To support these points of view, the article includes a case study showing a psychoanalytically informed approach in music therapy. This paper was given as a keynote address at the 1994 Australian Conference of Music Therapy.
Why Use Music in English Language Learning? A Survey of the Literature  [cached]
Dwayne Engh
English Language Teaching , 2013, DOI: 10.5539/elt.v6n2p113
Abstract: The use of music and song in the English language-learning classroom is not new. While many teachers intuitively feel that music is beneficial in teaching English language, there is sometimes a lack of the theoretical underpinnings that support such a choice. There are examples in the literature to argue the strong relationship between music and language that are substantiated by research in the fields of cognitive science, anthropology, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, First Language Acquisition (FLA) and Second Language Acquisition (SLA).
Why Movement Is Captured by Music, but Less by Speech: Role of Temporal Regularity  [PDF]
Simone Dalla Bella, Anita Bia?uńska, Jakub Sowiński
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0071945
Abstract: Music has a pervasive tendency to rhythmically engage our body. In contrast, synchronization with speech is rare. Music’s superiority over speech in driving movement probably results from isochrony of musical beats, as opposed to irregular speech stresses. Moreover, the presence of regular patterns of embedded periodicities (i.e., meter) may be critical in making music particularly conducive to movement. We investigated these possibilities by asking participants to synchronize with isochronous auditory stimuli (target), while music and speech distractors were presented at one of various phase relationships with respect to the target. In Exp. 1, familiar musical excerpts and fragments of children poetry were used as distractors. The stimuli were manipulated in terms of beat/stress isochrony and average pitch to achieve maximum comparability. In Exp. 2, the distractors were well-known songs performed with lyrics, on a reiterated syllable, and spoken lyrics, all having the same meter. Music perturbed synchronization with the target stimuli more than speech fragments. However, music superiority over speech disappeared when distractors shared isochrony and the same meter. Music’s peculiar and regular temporal structure is likely to be the main factor fostering tight coupling between sound and movement.
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