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An Empirical Study of Public Service Librarians’ Perceptions and Causes of Negative Emotions in Taiwan’s Public Libraries
Chen Su-may Sheih
Journal of Library and Information Studies , 2010,
Abstract: Research has documented that, in service organization, effectiveness is thought to hinge partly on the emotions expressed by employees. In librarianship, emotions also play an important role in affecting librarian's attitude to patrons and in turn his/her job performance. Librarians are the library's most effective representatives. Patrons judge the entire library by librarian' s behaviors. Thus, librarians' expression of emotions is one of the key factors of library service. Moreover, research on feelings experienced and expressed by organizational members emphasizes emotions as indicators of wellbeing and happiness. Employing literature review and analysis, questionnaires, and statistics analysis, this study explored public service librarians’ perceptions and causes of negative emotions in the public library settings in Taiwan. [Article content in Chinese; Extended abstract in English]
A Study of Readers’ Negative Emotions in University Libraries
Chen Su-may Sheih
Journal of Library and Information Studies , 2011,
Abstract: Readers’ evaluation of library service depends much on their emotional feelings towards library usage, in particular negative ones. The current study investigates the causes and categories of readers’ negative feelings in library usage. Thirty-two readers were interviewed for their experiences of negative feelings in library, which were then categorized into the following seven types: anger, anxiety, alarm, frustration, helplessness, sadness, and shame. In addition, readers’ negative feelings in library were found to result from libraries’ regulations/management, other readers, facilities, environment/space, library staff, collection, and information technology/software. [Article content in Chinese]
Impact of Negative Emotions on leader’s Performance (An empirical study of banking sector of Pakistan)
Shuja ILyas,Ayaz Elahi
International Journal of Trends in Economics Management and Technology , 2013,
Abstract: Organizations involve emotions and passions. The management of emotions is complex and unstable. Some emotions maybe controlled and some may be redirected, yet many have roots in unconscious origins. Exhibit of Negative emotions had a significant and negative affect on follower assessment of leader effectiveness as compared to neutral emotional display. This study focused on three mainnegative emotions like depression, anxiety and irritation that directly affect the leader’s performance. This study uses questionnaire approach in order to examine the extent to which these negative emotions affect the leader’s performance. Results indicated that anxiety, irritation and depression have significant impact on leader’s performance. There is an instruction for managers to create and keep a positive emotional climate in their workplaces rather than negative emotions.
A Qualitative Study on the Effect of Emotions on Expert Rating in Teaching Evaluation  [PDF]
Yanyan Sheng, Qiushan Yu, Yougen Lou
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2017.54021
Abstract: Interview, Coding and Grounded theory are adopted to study the effect of emotions on expert rating scores in teaching evaluation. In teaching evaluation, various levels of teaching abilities induce different expert emotions, which, together with Emotion Display Rules will affect the rating scores. To improve the application of expert rating results, expert evaluation scores should be validated and experts should be trained on the rating criteria when the evaluation results are applied to teaching management.
Regulation of negative emotions in high trait anxious individuals: an ERP study
Mocaiber, Izabela;Pereira, Mirtes Garcia;Erthal, Fátima Smith;Figueira, Ivan;Machado-Pinheiro, Walter;Cagy, Maurício;Volchan, Eliane;Oliveira, Letícia de;
Psychology & Neuroscience , 2009, DOI: 10.3922/j.psns.2009.2.014
Abstract: literature has shown that failures in the ability to down-regulate negative emotions are the core substrate of anxiety disorders. previous studies have investigated this issue by encouraging individuals to voluntarily change how they think about a situation in order to decrease its emotional impact. the majority of studies has demonstrated that explicit instructions to reduce negative affect in anxious individuals are usually ineffective. thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate whether an implicit regulation strategy would modulate electrophysiological activity (late positive potential) associated to affective picture viewing. the late positive potential (lpp) is a sustained positive deflection in the event-related potential that is larger following the presentation of emotional compared to neutral visual stimuli. participants (low trait anxious - lta and high trait anxious - hta individuals) performed an attention task (bar orientation discrimination) while emotional distractive pictures were presented. the task was performed in two different contexts: in the real context, participants were informed that the distractive pictures had been obtained from real life situations, whereas in the fictitious context they were told that the pictures had been obtained from movie scenes. in this vein, we encouraged participants to change how they appraised the pictures. results showed that hta individuals exhibited larger late positive potential (lpps) when mutilation pictures were presented in the real context. importantly, during the fictitious one (regulation strategy) the lpp was reduced even in hta individuals, emphasizing its importance to psychotherapeutic interventions. the present results indicate that hta individuals are susceptible to modifications in affective contexts.
REGULATION OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS IN HIGH TRAIT ANXIOUS INDIVIDUALS: AN ERP STUDY
Izabela Mocaiber, Mirtes Garcia Pereira, Fa?tima Smith Erthal, Ivan Figueira, Walter Machado-Pinheiro, Mauri?cio Cagy, Eliane Volchan & Leti?cia de Oliveira
Psychology & Neuroscience , 2009,
Abstract: Literature has shown that failures in the ability to down-regulate negative emotions are the core substrate of anxiety disorders. Previous studies have investigated this issue by encouraging individuals to voluntarily change how they think about a situation in order to decrease its emotional impact. The majority of studies has demonstrated that explicit instructions to reduce negative affect in anxious individuals are usually ineffective. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate whether an implicit regulation strategy would modulate electrophysiological activity (Late Positive Potential) associated to affective picture viewing. The Late Positive Potential (LPP) is a sustained positive deflection in the event-related potential that larger following the presentation of emotional compared to neutral visual stimuli. Participants (low trait anxious - LTA and high trait anxious - HTA individuals) performed an attention task (bar orientation discrimination) while emotional distractive pictures were presented. The task was performed in two different contexts: in the Real context, participants were informed that the distractive pictures had been obtained from real life situations, whereas in the Fictitious context they were told that pictures had been obtained from movie scenes. In this vein, we encouraged participants to change how they appraised the pictures. Results showed that HTA individuals exhibited larger Late Positive Potential (LPPs) when mutilation pictures were presented in the Real context. Importantly, during the Fictitious one (regulation strategy) the LPP was reduced even in HTA individuals, emphasizing its importance to psychotherapeutic interventions. The present results indicate that HTA individuals are susceptible to modifications in affective contexts.
The Source of the Cadet Negative Emotions and Countermeasures  [PDF]
Yaozhong Liu, Xiaofang Liu
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2016.48003
Abstract: Because of more complex environment and the heavy study and training tasks, the cadets are more vulnerable to the attack of negative emotions that affect their psychological health. It is vitally significant to focus attention on the negative emotions and cadets active coping measures, which are proposed to improve the mental health. In this paper, the cadets’ negative emotions system research, analyses of the cadet negative energy source and the corresponding countermeasures are put forward.
Emotions experienced by nurses working in units of personality disorders in the care of people with borderline personality disorder  [cached]
Alicia Domínguez Bermejo
NURE Investigación , 2011,
Abstract: The borderline personality disorder (BPD) is defined as a pervasive pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image and emotions with marked impulsivity. The clinical management of patients diagnosed with BPD is difficult for nurses due to the clinical characteristics of these subjects. This study seeks to address the emotions expressed by nurses working in units of personality disorder.Objectives: To determine the emotions experienced by nurses working in personality disorders treatment units during the care of patients diagnosed with BPD. To describe the type of emotions experienced, positive or negative; to identify the triggering situations for different types of emotions; to explore the influence of the experienced emotions when acting with these patients; to address the different ways to handle emotions based on the received training and professional experience during the care of patients diagnosed with BPD and to address the different ways to handle emotions according to the gender of the nurses. Methodology: Qualitative research in health. The information generation techniques employed are in-depth interviews and focus/debate groups.
Psychological Counselors’ Coping Strategies with Emotions  [PDF]
Bahad?r BOZO?LAN,?brahim ?ANKAYA
Journal of Kirsehir Education Faculty , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of the study is to present how often the scholl counselorsexperience the emotions of anger, sadness, fear and hatred and what they do to cope with these emotions. In the study, the qualitative research method was used. From the 49 provinces of Turkey, 140 people comprising of women and 81 men participated and the feedback from 101 of these participants were taken. An open-ended semi- structured question form which was developed by the researchers to collect the data was used. The Nvivo9 package software programme has been used for the process of entering, studying and analysing the data by tabulating it. To cope with manage negative emotions, the participants were in general seen to use some coping strategies with their emotions such as ‘trying to forget and avoid, turning into introvert and share, turning into extrovert and face off and trying to be calm’.
Emotions of Gynecologic Cancer Patients Dealing with Permanent Colostomy: A Qualitative Interview Study  [PDF]
Gül P?nar, Ali Ayhan, Tevfik P?nar
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2013.46120
Abstract:

Purpose: This study was conducted to describe emotional state of colostomized patients with gynecologic cancer. Patients and Methods: The study employed a qualitative design from May to October of 2010, in a private university hospitals outpatient gnecologic oncology clinic in Ankara, Turkey. Content analysis with an inductive approach had been used to analyze 32 interviews that served as the data base for this study. Interview form that focused on what gynecologic cancer women felt to living with a colostomy. Results: Findings also reveal that gynecologic cancer patients with colostomy experience many uneasy feelings that affect their emotional state. The content analysis resulted in the development of two thematic units. The first we described as “To experience the consequences of stoma as a gynecologic cancer patients”. The second was “suffering experienced-being challenged the consequences of the stoma”, and the third was “promote self management-normalization of the new condition”. For the psychological support, family and friends’ support has been mentioned as the most important part that can release their anxiety. Conclusions: We concluded that a having stoma was difficult for the women. The emotional state of the women when they get colostomy was typically characterized by fear, and worry about their current process. Body image, self-esteem, social activity, sexuality were the aspects that most affected the patients. Nurses have very important role within holistic approach and empathetic interaction, for determining major problem areas.

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