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Graham Greene and Cuba: Our man in Havana?
Peter Hulme
New West Indian Guide , 2008,
Abstract: [First paragraph] Graham Greene’s novel Our Man in Havana was published on October 6, 1958. Seven days later Greene arrived in Havana with Carol Reed to arrange for the filming of the script of the novel, on which they had both been working. Meanwhile, after his defeat of the summer offensive mounted by the Cuban dictator, Fulgencio Batista, in the mountains of eastern Cuba, just south of Bayamo, Fidel Castro had recently taken the military initiative: the day after Greene and Reed’s arrival on the island, Che Guevara reached Las Villas, moving westwards towards Havana. Six weeks later, on January 1, 1959, after Batista had fled the island, Castro and his Cuban Revolution took power. In April 1959 Greene and Reed were back in Havana with a film crew to film Our Man in Havana. The film was released in January 1960. A note at the beginning of the film says that it is “set before the recent revolution.” In terms of timing, Our Man in Havana could therefore hardly be more closely associated with the triumph of the Cuban Revolution. But is that association merely accidental, or does it involve any deeper implications? On the fiftieth anniversary of novel, film, and Revolution, that seems a question worth investigating, not with a view to turning Our Man in Havana into a serious political novel, but rather to exploring the complexities of the genre of comedy thriller and to bringing back into view some of the local contexts which might be less visible now than they were when the novel was published and the film released.
Religious paradoxes in Graham Greene’s novels  [cached]
Nettie Cloete
Koers : Bulletin for Christian Scholarship , 1998, DOI: 10.4102/koers.v63i4.539
Abstract: Graham Greene's work, especially his major novels, reveals his probing interest in religious matters. His writing indicates that throughout his career he has found himself involved in essential - and often paradoxical - questions concerning religious faith, particularly as these questions impinge on the twentieth-century mind. In this article some of Greene’s paradoxical views on religious matters are explored in a more universal and anti-institutional context than the strictly Roman Catholic one in which his work is usually examined As exemplars of Greene’s work in which religious paradoxes are central, Brighton Rock, The Power and the Glory and Monsignor Quixote are discussed. This article underscores the fact that Greene has almost single-handedly redefined twentieth-century Roman Catholic notions on piety with his constant revelation that pious people often lack charity while salvation is possible for sinners. It also shows that Greene’s novels radically question the doctrines on morality espoused by conventional churches, thereby displaying his own religious sensitivity and courage.
A Brief Outlook on Graham Greene’s Reception in France
Gianina Daniela SABAU
Studii de Stiinta si Cultura , 2011,
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to provide a brief outlook on Graham Greene’s reception inFrance in order to analyze the author’s worth as a major European literary figure. Accordingly, wehave proceeded to the examination of some of the French critical studies centered on the Britishauthor’s work namely Victor de Pange’s monograph as well as some of the works of the Frenchscholar Francois Gallix. Our study manages to show Graham Greene’s writings fit into a specificFrench literary pattern.
Early Translations of Graham Greene: Communist Censorship and Translation Policies
Gianina Daniela SABAU
Studii de Stiinta si Cultura , 2012,
Abstract: he purpose of this article is to provide an outlook on the reception of Graham Greene’s novels in our country during the communist period through the translations of Petre Solomon and Anton Lupan. The author’s novels translated in our country are discussed in the communist socio-cultural context which on the one hand facilitated the translation of impressive number of novels by Graham Greene but on the other hand it maintained a selective attitude towards his work. We consider Petre Solomon and Radu Lupan’s attempts to give a complex and comprehensive critical evaluation of Greene’s work seeks to restore Graham Greene’s image from that of an agile storyteller to that of a revolutionary writer who probes into the depths of human nature.
Graham Greene’s The Quiet American. A Sartrian Existentialist Critique
Gianina Daniela SABAU
Studii de Stiinta si Cultura , 2012,
Abstract: The article highlights the influence of the French existentialist philosopher Sartre on Greene. Along with the publication of his late novels, Graham Greene’ writing has been tinged with Existentialism which portrays his universe with absurd and comical stances. Therefore, we hold that the typical Greene character from his post-war writings (for example Fowler in The Quiet American) has an existentialist emotional make-up because he rejects established social and religious norms.
PITY: THE OBSESSIONAL THEME A STUDY OF GRAHAM GREENE'S THE HEART OF THE MATTER
ALKA SAROHA,S. K. VASISHTA
Golden Research Thoughts , 2013, DOI: 10.9780/22315063
Abstract: Graham Greene in his novel The Heart of the Matter deals with the theme of pity. He has given us one of the most intuitive analysis of the emotion of pity as an obsession in the portrayal of Scobie. Scobie's relationships are all based on pity. He is a weak man with good intentions doomed by his big sense of pity. Each character in the novel, be it Scobie or Wilson, fails in their ultimate goals by the end of the book. Scobie's ultimate sacrifice, suicide, fails to bring the expected happiness he imagines it will to his wife. The Heart of the Matter is not just about failure, but about the price we all pay for our individualism and the impossibility of truly understanding another person.
The Search for Utopia and its Consequences: Political Commitment in Historia de Mayta by Mario Vargas Llosa and The Honorary Consul by Graham Greene  [cached]
Beatriz Valverde Jiménez
Interlitteraria , 2013, DOI: 10.12697/il.2013.18.1.09
Abstract: This article compares the political evolution of Graham Greene and Mario Vargas Llosa, concretely through the analysis of their novels The Honorary Consul (1973) and Historia de Mayta (1984). We examine how, on the one hand, Greene values positively the search for a utopian society of León Rivas, as a means of founding a fairer society. On the other hand, Vargas Llosa, totally disillusioned with his former belief in Socialism, condemns that same search by Alejandro Mayta, since from his point of view, searching a utopian society only leads to failure and death.
L’abandon et l’appel, ou l’optimisme paradoxal de Graham Greene dans The Power and the Glory Abandoned and Called, or Graham Greene’s Paradoxical Optimism in The Power and the Glory  [cached]
René Gallet
Revue LISA / LISA e-journal , 2009, DOI: 10.4000/lisa.109
Abstract: The Power and the Glory is often seen as a pessimistic, if not tragic, work. However, this fails to consider Greene’s little-known statement to the contrary, as well as important aspects of the novel, one of them being the idea of “glory” in the title. In the narrative itself, a fragmented presence of beauty can be discovered as early as the opening scene, and more particularly within Mr Tench’s seedy universe. Two contrasting worlds are thus intermingled from the very beginning, and the rest of the novel is interspersed with similar examples. A related observation can be made about the feeling of abandonment voiced by most of the characters. When examined more closely, the feeling turns out to be highly ambiguous, and not always devoid of bad faith. It should be contrasted with the repeated phenomenon of calls to responsible action. The most striking one is also found in the opening scene, where the fugitive priest is reminded of his duty by the mysterious, though seedy-looking, native child. And through the priest a call is addressed to Mr Tench, who fails to perceive anything. This call to his repressed conscience is repeated in the final scene when he witnesses the priest’s execution. Newman’s understanding of man’s condition probably underlies such contrasts “between the beautiful and the treacherous”. The degraded world in which most characters evolve is not to be isolated from the experience of conscience which both confirms the reality of this negative state of affairs and, in varying degrees, distances the characters from it.
L’abandon et l’appel, ou l’optimisme paradoxal de Graham Greene dans The Power and the Glory Abandoned and Called, or Graham Greene’s Paradoxical Optimism in The Power and the Glory
René Gallet
Revue LISA / LISA e-journal , 2007, DOI: 10.4000/lisa.644
Abstract: The Power and the Glory is often seen as a pessimistic, if not tragic, work. However, this fails to consider Greene’s little-known statement to the contrary, as well as important aspects of the novel, one of them being the idea of “glory” in the title. In the narrative itself, a fragmented presence of beauty can be discovered as early as the opening scene, and more particularly within Mr Tench’s seedy universe. Two contrasting worlds are thus intermingled from the very beginning, and the rest of the novel is interspersed with similar examples. A related observation can be made about the feeling of abandonment voiced by most of the characters. When examined more closely, the feeling turns out to be highly ambiguous, and not always devoid of bad faith. It should be contrasted with the repeated phenomenon of calls to responsible action. The most striking one is also found in the opening scene, where the fugitive priest is reminded of his duty by the mysterious, though seedy looking, native child. And through the priest a call is addressed to Mr Tench, who fails to perceive anything. This call to his repressed conscience is repeated in the final scene when he witnesses the priest’s execution. Newman’s understanding of man’s condition probably underlies such contrasts “between the beautiful and the treacherous”. The degraded world in which most characters evolve is not to be isolated from the experience of conscience which both confirms the reality of this negative state of affairs and, in varying degrees, distances the characters from it.
Obituary of Graham Everest  [PDF]
Thomas Ward
Mathematics , 2013, DOI: 10.1112/blms/bdt053
Abstract: Obituary of Graham Everest (1957-2010)
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