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Bezoar gástrico como complicación de banda gástrica en manejo de obesidad mórbida: Caso clínico Gastric bezoar as complication of gastric banding: Report of one case  [cached]
Claudio Cortés,Claudio Silva
Revista médica de Chile , 2008,
Abstract: Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is used for the management of morbid obesity. Phytobezoars are rarely reported as a complication of this operation and are usually extracted by endoscopic means. We report a 48 year-old male subjected to a gastric banding, that consulted for progressive dysphagia, six months after the operation. A barium meal x-ray examination demonstrated the presence of a bezoar that was dissolved in one week using papain. A control barium meal confirmed the disappearance of the bezoar .
Successful endoscopic resolution of a large gastric bezoar in a child  [cached]
Sara Azevedo,Jo?o Lopes,António Marques,Paula Mourato
World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy , 2011, DOI: 10.4253/wjge.v3.i6.129
Abstract: Bezoars are masses or concretions of indigestible materials found in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach. Case reports of childhood gastric bezoars (particularly phytobezoars) are rare. In this age group they represent a therapeutic challenge, because of the combination of hard consistency and great size. The present report concerns an 8-year-old boy with a history of high fruit intake, presenting with abdominal complaints due to a large gastric phytobezoar. Successful endoscopic fragmentation coupled with suction removal was accomplished, using a standard-channel endoscope. Although laborious, it has been shown to be an efficacious and safe procedure, completed in one session. Endoscopic techniques for pediatric bezoar management may thus be cost effective, taking into account the avoidance of surgery, the length of the hospital stay and the number of endoscopic sessions.
Gastric Bezoar after Vertical Banded Gastroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature  [PDF]
Abdul S. Bangura, Stelin Johnson, Karen E. Gibbs
Surgical Science (SS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2011.25053
Abstract: Gastric bezoars are uncommon in the bariatric surgery population. Though popular in earlier decades, the Vertical Banded Gastroplasty (VBG) is no longer a staple procedure in the United States. It has been supplanted by the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) and the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) as the most commonly performed bariatric procedures. However, there are many patients who have previously undergone VBGs, and may present with associated complications. We present a case of a gastric obstruction caused by a bezoar in a patient who had a VBG fifteen years prior to presentation.
Duodenal obstruction following acute pancreatitis caused by a large duodenal diverticular bezoar  [cached]
Ji Hun Kim,Jae Hyuck Chang,Sung Min Nam,Mi Jeong Lee
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2012, DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v18.i38.5485
Abstract: Bezoars are concretions of indigestible materials in the gastrointestinal tract. It generally develops in patients with previous gastric surgery or patients with delayed gastric emptying. Cases of periampullary duodenal divericular bezoar are rare. Clinical manifestations by a bezoar vary from no symptom to acute abdominal syndrome depending on the location of the bezoar. Biliary obstruction or acute pancreatitis caused by a bezoar has been rarely reported. Small bowel obstruction by a bezoar is also rare, but it is a complication that requires surgery. This is a case of acute pancreatitis and subsequent duodenal obstruction caused by a large duodenal bezoar migrating from a periampullary diverticulum to the duodenal lumen, which mimicked pancreatic abscess or microperforation on abdominal computerized tomography. The patient underwent surgical removal of the bezoar and recovered completely.
Bezoar in gastro-jejunostomy presenting with symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction: a case report and review of the literature
Edmund Leung, Ruth Barnes, Ling Wong
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-2-323
Abstract: A 62-year-old Asian woman with a history of gastrojejunostomy for peptic ulcer disease was admitted to hospital with epigastric pain, vomiting and dehydration. All investigations concluded gastric outlet obstruction secondary to a "stricture" at the site of gastrojejunostomy. Subsequent laparotomy revealed that the cause of the obstruction was a bezoar.Many bezoars can be removed endoscopically, but some will require operative intervention. Once removed, emphasis must be placed upon prevention of recurrence. Surgeons must learn to recognise and classify bezoars in order to provide the most effective therapy.Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) in adults is not a single entity; it is the pathophysiological consequence of any disease process that produces a mechanical impediment to gastric emptying. There are benign and malignant causes. In the past, peptic ulcer disease was more prevalent than malignant causes, currently, it only accounts for 5% of all cases of GOO [1]. With the advent of proton pump inhibitors and Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy, this benign cause has become less common. Andersson and Bergdahl reported [2] that 67% of patients have GOO secondary to malignancy. Other benign intraluminal causes in adults include gastric polyps, caustic ingestion, gallstone obstruction (Bouveret syndrome), and bezoars.Bezoars, concretions of indigestible material in the gastrointestinal tract, have been known to occur in animals for centuries. The incidence of bezoars in adult patients has increased as a result of operative manipulation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although bezoars are often recognised radiologically, endoscopy provides the most accurate means of identification. Many bezoars can be removed endoscopically, but some will require operative intervention. Once removed, emphasis must be placed upon prevention of recurrence. Surgeons must learn to recognise and classify bezoars in order to provide the most effective therapy.We report a case of a 62-year
Esophageal and small bowel obstruction by occupational bezoar: report of a case
Michail Pitiakoudis, Alexandra Tsaroucha, Konstantinos Mimidis, Theodoros Constantinidis, Stavros Anagnostoulis, George Stathopoulos, Constantinos Simopoulos
BMC Gastroenterology , 2003, DOI: 10.1186/1471-230x-3-13
Abstract: A 70-year old male is presented suffering from esophageal and small bowel obstruction, caused by an occupational bezoar. The patient has worked as a carpenter for 35 years. He had undergone a vagotomy and pyloroplasty 10 years earlier. The part of the bezoar, which caused the esophageal obstruction was removed during endoscopy, while the part of the small bowel was treated surgically. The patient recovered well and was discharged on the 8th postoperative day.Since occupational bezoars may be a cause of intestinal obstruction (esophageal and/or small bowel), patients who have undergone a previous gastric surgery should avoid occupational exposures similar to the presented case.Phytobezoar causing bowel obstruction in patients with previous gastric surgery is a well known late complication, although very rare. It is a concretion of food fibers (fruit and vegetable fibers) or foreign bodies in the stomach [1]. The stomach is the most common place of bezoar formation. In a normal stomach vegetable fibers can not pass through the pylorus; they undergo hydrolysis within the stomach, which softens them enough to go through the small bowel. After gastric surgery, because the gastric motility is disturbed, the gastric acidity is decreased, and the stomach may rapidly empty, there is an increased possibility for bezoar formation, causing acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction.Reports of bezoars causing obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract exist since the late 18th century [2]. Mir and Mir [3] reported on 22 cases of bezoar found in the literature from 1966 to 1973. Most case reports refer to bezoars of food with fibers or foreign bodies. Moseley [4] reported the first case of a phytobezoar (citrus, onions, mushrooms) following vagotomy and pyloroplasty.There have not been incidents of occupational reason. The reverse migration of the bezoar to the esophagus is also very rare, and may occur after persistent vomiting and bezoar fragmentation [5,6]. In this paper, the
Bezoar gástrico como complicación de banda gástrica en manejo de obesidad mórbida: Caso clínico
Cortés,Claudio; Silva,Claudio;
Revista médica de Chile , 2008, DOI: 10.4067/S0034-98872008001100013
Abstract: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (lagb) is used for the management of morbid obesity. phytobezoars are rarely reported as a complication of this operation and are usually extracted by endoscopic means. we report a 48 year-old male subjected to a gastric banding, that consulted for progressive dysphagia, six months after the operation. a barium meal x-ray examination demonstrated the presence of a bezoar that was dissolved in one week using papain. a control barium meal confirmed the disappearance of the bezoar .
Bezoar gástrico e intestinal: caso clínico e revis?o da literatura
Andrade,Carla Sousa; Lopes,Sandra; Pinheiro,Carlos; Figueiredo,Pedro; Tomé,Luís; Pinho,António; Martinho,Fernando; Sofia,Carlos; Leit?o,Maximino Correia;
Jornal Português de Gastrenterologia , 2009,
Abstract: gastrointestinal bezoars are relatively uncommon findings and its distribution has a regional variation that correlates with differences in fibre enriched alimentary products ingestion. its true incidence is unknown but its occurrence shows a growing tendency, which is probably related with the higher number of gastroduodenal surgeries performed in the past century, considered to be risk factors for bezoar formation. the authors present the case of a patient with a past history of gastric and duodenal surgery, admitted with vomiting, abdominal pain and distension, anorexia and weight loss. the diagnostic workup brought about the possibility of the existence of two bezoars, one gastric and one intestinal, which were confirmed by surgery.
An unusual cause of gastric outlet obstruction in a young girl: Trichobezoar  [PDF]
Mahdi Bouassida, Hédi Charrada, Mohamed Fadhel Chtourou, Lamine Hamzaoui, Mohamed Monji Mighri, Mohamed Msaddak Azzouz, Hassen Touinsi, Sadok Sassi
Open Journal of Gastroenterology (OJGas) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojgas.2012.24041
Abstract: Trichobezoars are an infrequent form of bezoars formed from ingested hair. They are more common in adolescent females with history of trichotillomania. Exceptionally, it can occur in young children making the diagnosis difficult. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with a history of abdominal pain, distension, weight loss, and attacks of vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a trichobezoar occupying almost the whole gastric cavity. The gastric bezoar was removed by surgery. Gastric trichobezoar is exceptional in young children and can lead to stunting and gastric outlet obstruction. After definitive surgical or endoscopic treatment, pediatric psychiatric consultation should be opted for any mental disorder and for prevention of further recurrence.
An Unusual Cause of Gastrointestinal Obstruction: Bezoar
Tariq O. Abbas
Oman Medical Journal , 2011,
Abstract: Bezoars are concretions of swallowed hair, fruit vegetable fibers, and similar substances found in the alimentary canal. The first description of a postmortem human bezoar was by Swain in 1854. Although the prevalence of bezoars in humans is low, an absence of treatment has been associated with mortality rates as high as 30 20primarily because of gastrointestinal bleeding, destruction, or perforation.
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