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Successful Treatment of a Child with Advanced Stage Renal Cell Carcinoma  [cached]
Serhan Kupeli,Bilgehan Yalcin,Munevver Buyukpamukcu
Cukurova Medical Journal , 2013,
Abstract: Treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in children is based on an extensive surgery. Radical nephrectomy with lymph node dissection is sufficient for most of the stage I-II tumors. However, in advanced disease some different management strategies have been defined including immunotherapy. We present a 9-year-old girl with advanced stage RCC, inoperable at the time of diagnosis and successfully treated with interferon-alpha after operation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000): 536-539]
Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma  [cached]
Akhtar Kafil,Shamshad Ahmad,Sufian Zaheer,Tariq Mansoor
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2011,
Abstract: Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (SRCC) is an aggressive tumor variant thought to arise predominantly from differentiation of clear cell carcinoma. A few reports of SRCC asso-ciated with non-clear cell tumors led to the presumption that SRCC may arise from any renal cell carcinoma, although direct evidence of this is lacking. We report a case of a 70-year-old male patient, who presented with acute left upper quadrant abdominal pain and was diagnosed to have SRCC after pathological examination. The patient is on high dose interleukin (IL-2)-based immunotherapy and is apparently free of disease six months after surgery.
Renal Cell Carcinoma in Transplanted Kidney
M. Naroienejad,R. Salouti
Iranian Journal of Radiology , 2005,
Abstract: Immunosuppressive drugs are prescribed routinely to kidney transplant recipients to prevent rejection. These medications are associated wi th an increased risk of secondary malignancies,including renal cell carcinoma in the transplanted kidney itself. We present a case of renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney.
Renal cell carcinoma in childhood
Barros, Luciano R.;Glina, Sidney;Mello, Luiz F.;
International braz j urol , 2004, DOI: 10.1590/S1677-55382004000300011
Abstract: the renal cell carcinoma (rcc) rarely occurs in childhood. we report here 3 cases of rcc in children. two girls and 1 boy aged 14, 8 and 13 years old, respectively, presented with gross hematuria as their main complaint. they underwent ultrasonography and computerized tomography, which revealed unilateral renal tumor with lymph nodal involvement in all 3 cases. they were treated with radical nephrectomy associated with regional lymphadenectomy, with histopathology of rcc. incomplete adjuvant radiotherapy was performed in 2 cases and no complementary treatment in the other one. all are disease-free in a period ranging from 9 to 77 months after diagnosis. radical nephrectomy associated with regional lymphadenectomy is the best treatment for rcc in childhood. the disease appears to have a less aggressive behavior in children.
Immunotherapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma  [PDF]
Momoe Itsumi,Katsunori Tatsugami
Clinical and Developmental Immunology , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/284581
Abstract: Immunotherapy plays a significant role in the management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with metastatic disease because RCC is highly resistant to both chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Many reports illustrate various approaches to the treatment of RCC, such as cytokine-, antigen- or dendritic cell- (DC-) based immunotherapy, and the safety and effectiveness of immunotherapy have been highlighted by multiple clinical trials. Although antitumor immune responses and clinically significant outcomes have been achieved in these trials, the response rate is still low, and very few patients show long-term clinical improvement. Recently, the importance of immune regulation by antigen-presenting cells (APC) and regulatory T cells (Treg cells) has also been discussed. The authors outline the principles of cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy and discuss clinical trials of immunotherapy for RCC.
Simultaneous Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and squamous renal cell carcinoma
Rafael Fúnez, Teresa Pereda, Isabel Rodrigo, Luis Robles, Carlos González
Diagnostic Pathology , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1746-1596-2-30
Abstract: Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (CHRC) is a neoplasm of the kidney described by Thoenes et al. in 1986 with clinicopathologic peculiarities, composed of typical cells with iron colloidal positive stain and seems to be of better prognostic than conventional renal cell carcinoma [1]. Classical and eosinophilic types are the two histological variants recorded. Also, it has been described in association with carcinoma of collecting ducts, conventional renal cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. We describe a case of concomitant chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the kidney.The patient, a 68-year-old hypertensive female presented with total hematuria and right flank pain. The ultrasonogragraphy demonstrated a solid mass with probably calcificated areas and cystic changes, and the CT scan a tumour in the upper pole of the kidney with heterogeneous contrast caption, calcifications and no enlargement of lymph nodes.Grossly the kidney showed a tumor centred in the upper pole with 4.6 cms in greatest dimension, without perinephric tissues or renal vein invasion. The neoplasm was in part brown and homogenous with other area grey coloured with necrotic/haemorrhagic appearance and calcifications. There was not presence of renal calculi in the renal pelvis. There was relationship of the neoplasm to the renal pelvis focally (figure 1). Also a normal macroscopically adrenal gland and two lymph nodes were received.Microscopically the tumour was composed by a typical chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with positive Hale's colloidal iron stain and negative inmmunocytochemistry test for vimentin (Dakocytomation S.A.) in the areas with brown, homogeneous appearance (figure 2). Near by these areas there was another zone with necrosis, extensive calcification and solid epithelial nests with some keratin pearls and obvious squamous differentiation (figures 3, 4). These cells were negative for Hale's colloidal iron stain and positive for cytokerati
Immunotherapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma  [PDF]
Momoe Itsumi,Katsunori Tatsugami
Journal of Immunology Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/284581
Abstract: Immunotherapy plays a significant role in the management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with metastatic disease because RCC is highly resistant to both chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Many reports illustrate various approaches to the treatment of RCC, such as cytokine-, antigen- or dendritic cell- (DC-) based immunotherapy, and the safety and effectiveness of immunotherapy have been highlighted by multiple clinical trials. Although antitumor immune responses and clinically significant outcomes have been achieved in these trials, the response rate is still low, and very few patients show long-term clinical improvement. Recently, the importance of immune regulation by antigen-presenting cells (APC) and regulatory T cells (Treg cells) has also been discussed. The authors outline the principles of cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy and discuss clinical trials of immunotherapy for RCC. 1. Introduction Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), a glandular carcinoma, accounts for approximately 85%–95% of adult malignant kidney cancer cases [1]. Patients with advanced or metastatic disease have a poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 15%. Surgical treatment is effective, even in patients with advanced or metastatic RCC, because of its high resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Immunotherapy using interferon (IFN)-α and/or interleukin (IL)-2 has shown promising anti-tumor activity in RCC [2–4]. However, these cytokines have a positive effect in only 10%–20% of cases [5]. Like melanoma, RCC is classed as an immunogenic tumor based on its response rate to immunotherapy, the incidence of spontaneous regression, and the high level of tumor T cell infiltration. Despite its immunogenicity, only a few CD8+ cytotoxic-T-lymphocytes (CTLs), which can efficiently eliminate RCC cells, have been isolated [6]. This is in line with the small number of RCC-associated antigens that have so far been identified, thereby limiting the trials of candidate vaccines in these patients [7, 8]. Recently, tumor immunotherapy using DC has been shown to have therapeutic potential for malignant tumors. Moreover, nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation (NST), which was developed for the treatment of leukemia, is effective against RCC [9, 10] and other solid tumors [11]. In this review, we discuss the current status of cell-mediated tumor-specific and nonspecific immunotherapy for RCC. 2. Tumor-Specific and Non-Specific Immunotherapy In vivo studies show that cellular immunity mediated by T cells, natural killer (NK) cells or NK T cells plays a central role in the
Gingival Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma
Eivazi Ziaei J,Fakhrgoo A,Estakhri R
Iranian Journal of Cancer Prevention , 2011,
Abstract: Metastases of internal tumors to the oral cavity are unusual and in most cases involve maxilla and mandible. Metastases to the gingival soft tissue are extremely rare. Reporting a new clinical case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastasis with an unusual site. Metastatic involvement of gingival tissue with renal cell carcinoma is an extremely rare clinical event. It is usually associated with involvement of an internal organ. We present a case of 47-year-old male patient diagnosed with RCC-associated gingival metastasis- who underwent radical nephrectomy. The wide range of localizations and forms of metastatic presentation of renal carcinoma should obligate physicians to be alert during the follow-ups.
Renal abscess in a child with sickle cell anemia  [cached]
Taksande Amar,Vilhekar K
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2009,
Abstract: Renal abscess is rare in children and the usual presenting features include fever, lumbar pain, abdominal pain and occasional flank mass. Renal ultrasonography facilitates an early diagnosis and helps in percutaneous drainage. We herewith report on a child with sickle cell anemia who developed a renal abscess.
Case of hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma  [cached]
Sadaf Mustafa,Nima Jadidi,Sheila F. Faraj,Ronald Rodriguez
Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives , 2012, DOI: 10.3402/jchimp.v1i4.9468
Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of renal malignancy and it originates from the renal tubular epithelium. Due to the diversity in the histopathological and molecular characteristics, it is typically subclassified into five different categories. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is one subclassification and it includes two variants: sporadic and hereditary. Although the hereditary form comprises a smaller number of cases of papillary renal cell carcinoma, an understanding of the molecular pathways and genetic changes continues to play a significant role in the development of new targeted therapies. Along with recommending appropriate lifestyle modification, further investigation into the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma will continue to be invaluable for the clinical management of renal cell carcinoma. In this article, we discuss a case of the hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma along with an overview of the disease.
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