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Evaluation of the Efficacy of Persica Mouth Wash on the Healing of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS)
P - Ghalayani,M. Gholrangi
Journal of Isfahan Dental School , 2006,
Abstract: Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is one of the most common Diseases of oral mucosa. In spite of its popularity and severity of pain, it dosen't have a routine treatment method. Because of side effects of different chemical drugs, recently, herbal drugs had been used in treatment of these lesions causing a decrease in pain and burning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of persica mouth wash in controlling the pain and decreasing the healing period of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS).Methods and materials: In this double blinded clinical trial study, 24 patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis without any systemic Diseases were chosen. Each patient was considered as study sample for one time period and then as control for another time period. The patients used persica mouth wash and placebo (as mouth wash) alternatively. A visual Analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the pain and burning of the lesions. For data analysis, chi square, t-test, and spss program was used.Results: There was a significant difference in pain reduction (62.5 and 20.8 percent) and burning reduction (70.8 and 25 percent) between experimental and control groups. There was no significant difference in healing period reduction between the two groups.Conclusion: In this study persica mouth wash as a herbal drug had a positive effect on pain and Burning of the Aphthous lesions. This mouth wash was not effective in reducing the healing period of these lesions. This study suggests the use of persica mouthwash alone or in combination with other drugs to decrease pain and burning of Aphthous lesions.Key words: Persica mouth wash, Healing, Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS).
Foundations for Wash Sales  [PDF]
Phillip G. Bradford
Journal of Mathematical Finance (JMF) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jmf.2016.64044
Abstract: Consider an ephemeral sale-and-repurchase of a security resulting in the same position before the sale and after the repurchase. A sale-and-repurchase is a wash sale if these transactions result in a loss within ±30 calendar days. Since a portfolio is essentially the same after a wash sale, any tax advantage from such a loss is not allowed. That is, after a wash sale a portfolio is unchanged so any loss captured by the wash sale is deemed to be solely for tax advantage and not investment purposes. This paper starts by exploring variations of the birthday problem to model wash sales. The birthday problem is: Determine the number of independent and identically distributed random variables required so there is a probability of at least 1/2 that two or more of these random variables share the same outcome. This paper gives necessary conditions for wash sales based on variations on the birthday problem. Suitable variations of the birthday problem are new to this paper. This allows us to answer questions such as: What is the likelihood of a wash sale in an unmanaged portfolio where purchases and sales are independent, uniform, and random? Portfolios containing options may lead to wash sales resembling these characteristics. This paper ends by exploring the Littlewood-Offord problem as it relates capital gains and losses with wash sales.
Foundations for Wash Sales  [PDF]
Phillip G. Bradford,Cheng-Few Lee
Quantitative Finance , 2015,
Abstract: Consider an ephemeral sale-and-repurchase of a security resulting in the same position before the sale and after the repurchase. A sale-and-repurchase is a wash sale if these transactions result in a loss within $\pm 30$ calendar days. Since a portfolio is essentially the same after a wash sale, any tax advantage from such a loss is not allowed. That is, after a wash sale a portfolio is unchanged so any loss captured by the wash sale is deemed to be solely for tax advantage and not investment purposes. This paper starts by exploring variations of the birthday problem to model wash sales. The birthday problem is: Determine the number of independent and identically distributed random variables required so there is a probability of at least 1/2 that two or more of these random variables share the same outcome. This paper gives necessary conditions for wash sales based on variations on the birthday problem. This allows us to answer questions such as: What is the likelihood of a wash sale in an unmanaged portfolio where purchases and sales are independent, uniform, and random? This paper ends by exploring the Littlewood-Offord problem as it relates capital gains and losses with wash sales.
Effect of Matrica Mouth Wash on Prevention of Head and Neck Radiotherapy Induced–Stomatitis
Shiva Sadat Bassampour,Fatemeh Bahramnezhad,Eisa Mohammadi,Mohammad Hassan Larizadeh
Hayat Journal of Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery , 2012,
Abstract: Background & Aim: Oral care and using mouthwash help to prevent stomatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of two mouth wash protocols on prevention of head and neck radiotherapy induced-stomatitis.Methods & Materials: In this single blind clinical trial, 120 individual were recruited. The experiment group (N=40) gurgled with 3cc of Matrices mouthwash and the control group used water mouth wash. The participants were assessed using the WHO grading scale. Data were analyzed using the Fisher exact test and Mann-Whitney U test as appropriate.Results: There was not significant differences between the experimental and control groups regarding stomatitis intensity in the first day (P=0.371). Tere were significant differences between the two groups regarding stomatitis intensity in days 7 and 14 (P<0.001). Conclusion: Oral stomatitis is a common condition in patients with head and neck radiotherapy. It makes painful ulcers, dehydration, malnutrition, and potentially life-threatening infection. Matrica mouth wash could prevent and treat induced-radiotherapy ulcer stomatitis.
What Happens at a Car Wash?
Barbara Gallick,Lisa Lee
Early Childhood Research & Practice , 2011,
Abstract: A class of 3- to 5-year-old children in a child care center in the midwestern United States chose to study a car wash as a group project. This article discusses how the project evolved, describes the three phases of the project, and provides the teachers’ reflections on the project. Photos taken during the project and children’s sketches are included.
Zeta potential of bacterial cells: Effect of wash buffers  [PDF]
Wenfa Ng
PeerJ , 2015, DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.110v1
Abstract: Zeta potential - defined as the electrical charge at the shear plane - is widely used as a proxy for cell surface charge. Consequent of its definition, nonspecific adsorption of ions on the cell surface may alter the value - and polarity - of the measured zeta potential, thereby, leading to erroneous results. Multiple wash and centrifugation steps are commonly used in preparing cells for zeta potential analysis – where various wash buffers (such as 9 g/L sodium chloride and 0.1M sodium nitrate) help remove ions and charged molecules nonspecifically bound to the cell surface. Nevertheless, little information on the wash buffers’ relative efficacies in removing nonspecifically bound ions hamper the comparison of zeta potential results across laboratories even for the same bacterial strain cultured under identical conditions. Thus, the present study sought to evaluate the effect of various wash buffers on zeta potential of bacterial cells grown in two culture media differing in salt content – thereby, allowing potential differential efficacy of buffers in removing nonspecifically adsorbed ions and metabolites to be discerned. Preliminary data revealed that for Escherichia coli DH5α (ATCC 53868) grown in LB Lennox (supplemented with 2 g/L glucose), the zeta potential-pH profile was not significantly different over the pH range from 2 to 12 for deionized water, 9 g/L sodium chloride, and phosphate buffer saline (PBS) wash buffers. As the glucose supplemented LB medium was a low salt medium without a phosphate buffer, it was unlikely that nonspecific adsorption of ions on the cell surface was extensive – thus, supporting the observation that the various wash buffers used did not have differential effect on zeta potential measurement. On the other hand, the zeta potential-pH profile of E. coli grown in a semi-defined medium with a high capacity phosphate buffer system, was significantly different over the pH range from 1 to 12 for deionized water, 9 g/L sodium chloride, 0.1M sodium nitrate, 0.1M sodium acetate, and 0.1M sodium citrate with the extent of difference positively correlated with wash buffers’ ionic strength. A similar relationship was also observed between the measured point of zero charge (pHzpc) and ionic strength of wash buffer, which, taken together, suggested that charge screening might be an important mechanism for removing the adsorbed ions. Collectively, although the experimental data suggests possible use of high ionic strength wash buffer in removing nonspecifically adsorbed ions from bacterial cell surface prior to zeta potential
A comparative study to assess the effect of amikacin sulfate bladder wash on catheter-associated urinary tract infection in neurosurgical patients  [cached]
Zacharias Sumi,Dwarakanath Srinivas,Agarwal Meena,Sharma Bhavani
Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Background: The indwelling urinary catheter is an essential part of modern medical care. Unfortunately, when poorly managed, the indwelling catheter may present a hazard to the very patients it is designed to protect. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection in hospitals and nursing homes. Aims and Objectives: The primary objective was to study the effect of amikacin sulfate bladder wash on CAUTI in neurosurgical patients. The other objectives were to study the various organisms causing CAUTI and their antibiotic sensitivity and resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective randomized controlled study performed on 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria at the neurosurgical intensive care of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences between June and December 2006. The patients were randomized into two groups - one was the trial group which received amikacin bladder wash, while the other was the control group that did not receive any bladder wash. Results: Forty percent of the subjects in the control group developed CAUTI, while none of the subjects in study group developed CAUTI. (Fisher′s exact test, P value < 0.001) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (51%) was the commonest pathogen. Conclusions: Amikacin sulfate bladder wash was effective in preventing CAUTI. It can thus decrease the antibiotic usage thereby preventing the emergence of antibiotic resistance.
Actin Polymerization Controls the Organization of WASH Domains at the Surface of Endosomes  [PDF]
Emmanuel Derivery, Emmanuèle Helfer, Véronique Henriot, Alexis Gautreau
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039774
Abstract: Sorting of cargoes in endosomes occurs through their selective enrichment into sorting platforms, where transport intermediates are generated. The WASH complex, which directly binds to lipids, activates the Arp2/3 complex and hence actin polymerization onto such sorting platforms. Here, we analyzed the role of actin polymerization in the physiology of endosomal domains containing WASH using quantitative image analysis. Actin depolymerization is known to enlarge endosomes. Using a novel colocalization method that is insensitive to the heterogeneity of size and shape of endosomes, we further show that preventing the generation of branched actin networks induces endosomal accumulation of the WASH complex. Moreover, we found that actin depolymerization induces a dramatic decrease in the recovery of endosomal WASH after photobleaching. This result suggests a built-in turnover, where the actin network, i.e. the product of the WASH complex, contributes to the dynamic exchange of the WASH complex by promoting its detachment from endosomes. Our experiments also provide evidence for a role of actin polymerization in the lateral compartmentalization of endosomes: several WASH domains exist at the surface of enlarged endosomes, however, the WASH domains coalesce upon actin depolymerization or Arp2/3 depletion. Branched actin networks are thus involved in the regulation of the size of WASH domains. The potential role of this regulation in membrane scission are discussed.
Human Subtelomeric WASH Genes Encode a New Subclass of the WASP Family  [PDF]
Elena V Linardopoulou,Sean S Parghi,Cynthia Friedman,Gregory E Osborn,Susan M Parkhurst,Barbara J Trask
PLOS Genetics , 2007, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.0030237
Abstract: Subtelomeres are duplication-rich, structurally variable regions of the human genome situated just proximal of telomeres. We report here that the most terminally located human subtelomeric genes encode a previously unrecognized third subclass of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein family, whose known members reorganize the actin cytoskeleton in response to extracellular stimuli. This new subclass, which we call WASH, is evolutionarily conserved in species as diverged as Entamoeba. We demonstrate that WASH is essential in Drosophila. WASH is widely expressed in human tissues, and human WASH protein colocalizes with actin in filopodia and lamellipodia. The VCA domain of human WASH promotes actin polymerization by the Arp2/3 complex in vitro. WASH duplicated to multiple chromosomal ends during primate evolution, with highest copy number reached in humans, whose WASH repertoires vary. Thus, human subtelomeres are not genetic junkyards, and WASH's location in these dynamic regions could have advantageous as well as pathologic consequences.
Freeze Concentration of Proteins in Antarctic Krill Wash Water Freeze Concentration of Proteins in Antarctic Krill Wash Water  [PDF]
QI Xiangming,XU Jing,ZHAO Kuo,GUO Hui,MA Lei
- , 2017,
Abstract: Water-washing removes fluoride from Antarctic krill but produces large volumes of wash water containing water-soluble proteins and fluoride. The freeze concentration method was tested to determine if it could be used to recover water-soluble proteins while leaving the fluoride in solution. After freezing and thawing the wash water, protein and fluoride contents of the thawed fractions were determined to explore the melting regularity of components in the wash water. The highest concentration factors of protein and fluoride were obtained after 80 min of thawing, such as 1.48 ± 0.06 and 1.35 ± 0.04 times, respectively. The free amino-nitrogen(FAN) content and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis pattern results revealed that the highest concentrations of all ingredients were obtained after 80 min of the process. The degree of hydrolysis of all fractions from the thawing process fluctuated in a narrow range around 12% during the entire process, indicating that the thawing order did not change with various proteins or time during the entire thawing course. These results demonstrate that the freeze concentration method can be used to concentrate protein solutions, even those with fluoride. It was concluded that condensation was achieved and no ingredient could be separated, regardless of fluoride, amino acids, or different proteins in the water
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