oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Education and science museums. Reflections in Italy and on Italy
Paola Rodari
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2008,
Abstract: The educational function of science museums was born with the first naturalistic collections ever, flourished in 16th-century Italy. The pedagogic thought and the educational experimentations carried out in approximately five century of history have allowed the educational mission of museums to acquire many different facets, drawing a task having an increasingly higher and complex social value. Recent publications explore these new meanings of an old role.
Science museums in a knowledge-based society (Italian original version)
Pietro Greco
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2007,
Abstract: What is the role of science museums nowadays? If we want to answer this question, we need to understand the historical period we are living and what role(s) museums can play. We are undoubtedly at the beginning of a new age based on a new relation between science and society, a concept which has been explained and repeated by sociologists and economists over and over again and is confirmed by statistics.
Birth of a science centre. Italian phenomenology (Italian original version)
Paola Rodari
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2006,
Abstract: In May 2004 the Balì Museum, Planetarium and interactive science museum, was opened to the public in Italy: 35 hands-on exhibits designed according to the interactive tradition of the Exploratorium in San Francisco, an astronomic observatory for educational activities, a Planetarium with 70 places. With a total investment of about three million euros, about two thirds of which were spent on restructuring the splendid eighteenth-century villa in which it is housed, the undertaking may be considered a small one in comparison with other European science centres. Three million euros: perhaps enough to cover the cost of only the splendid circular access ramp to the brand-new Cosmocaixa in Barcelona, an investment of one hundred million euros. But the interesting aspect of the story of the Balì Museum (but also of other Italian stories, as we shall see) lies in the fact that this lively and advanced science centre stands in the bucolic region of the Marches, next to a small town of only 800 inhabitants (Saltara, in the Province of Pesaro and Urbino), in a municipal territory that has a total of 5000. Whereas in Italy the projects for science centres comparable with the Catalan one, for example projects for Rome and Turin, never get off the ground, smaller ones are opening in small and medium-sized towns: why is this? And what does the unusual location of the centres entail for science communication in Italy? This Focus does not claim to tell the whole truth about Italian interactive museums, but it does offer some phenomenological cues to open a debate on the cultural, economic and political premises that favour their lives.
Are museums places where science and society can really engage in a dialogue? A positive example related to the rubbish emergency in the Campania region (Italian original version)  [PDF]
Luigi Amodio
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2008,
Abstract: Science musums and science centres are wonderful places to host, support and mediate the dialogue between science and society. In fact, they are a natural crossroad where scientists, general public, media and insitutions for formal and informal learning meet. During the recent political and health crisis concerning the rubbish treatment in the Italian region of Campania, the science centre "Città della Scienza" has promoted an unusual dialogue between citizens and scientists.
Birth of a science centre. Italian phenomenology  [PDF]
Paola Rodari
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2006,
Abstract: In May 2004 the Balì Museum, Planetarium and interactive science museum, was opened to the public in Italy: 35 hands-on exhibits designed according to the interactive tradition of the Exploratorium in San Francisco, an astronomic observatory for educational activities, a Planetarium with 70 places. With a total investment of about three million euros, about two thirds of which were spent on restructuring the splendid eighteenth-century villa in which it is housed, the undertaking may be considered a small one in comparison with other European science centres. Three million euros: perhaps enough to cover the cost of only the splendid circular access ramp to the brand-new Cosmocaixa in Barcelona, an investment of one hundred million euros. But the interesting aspect of the story of the Balì Museum (but also of other Italian stories, as we shall see) lies in the fact that this lively and advanced science centre stands in the bucolic region of the Marches, next to a small town of only 800 inhabitants (Saltara, in the Province of Pesaro and Urbino), in a municipal territory that has a total of 5000. Whereas in Italy the projects for science centres comparable with the Catalan one, for example projects for Rome and Turin, never get off the ground, smaller ones are opening in small and medium-sized towns: why is this? And what does the unusual location of the centres entail for science communication in Italy? This Focus does not claim to tell the whole truth about Italian interactive museums, but it does offer some phenomenological cues to open a debate on the cultural, economic and political premises that favour their lives.
POMUI. The web portal of Italian university museums  [PDF]
Elena Corradini
University Museums and Collections Journal , 2011,
Abstract: In recent years Italian university museums have faced difficult times as funding has become difficult and usage has declined. The situation was degenerating into a crisis. A solution was needed. How could the isolated, individual museums be re-vitalized into a sustainable, useful, accessible, cooperative group? The answer was to build a digital gateway: a computer web portal through which teachers, students, academics and the general public can visit the individual collections digitally, while the curators are free to concentrate on preservation, cataloguing, research and display. The web portal was developed at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia during a course in computer cataloguing for the valorization of cultural heritage. It is called POMUI (POrtal MUseums Italian). The use of POMUI will help preserve Italian heritage, promote university museum and contribute to social networking.
Medicalisation (Italian original version)
Mario Colucci
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2006,
Abstract: Medicalisation means first of all a science – medicine – going beyond its boundaries: from the art of healing individuals, or systematically classifying useful information to treat diseases affecting individuals, it gradually turns into a pervasive development of knowledge and practices that, from the 18th century onward, are applied to collective issues, which traditionally are not regarded as medical issues, thus moving toward large-scale protection of the social body health. The physical wellbeing of people, as well as the protection and improvement of their health condition, become one of the main objectives of the political power, which aims not only at dealing with social marginalisation and poverty to make them productive, but also at “planning society as sphere of physical wellbeing, optimal health and longevity”.
Evoking humanity: Reflections on the importance of university museums and collections  [PDF]
Alan D. Gilbert
University Museums and Collections Journal , 2009,
Abstract: In this paper, Professor Alan Gilbert, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Manchester, welcomes UMAC delegates and explains why he feels that museums in general - and university museums in particular - are singularly important.
AUSF Italy: the national organization of Italian students in Forestry
Cardellini G,Cirolli M,Rosa P,Franza A
Forest@ , 2010,
Abstract: AUSF Italia, the Italian Organization of Forestry Students, was born. The constituent assembly was held on 28 September 2009 at Capracotta (Molise, Italy).
The disease and the treatment: some remarks on the Darwin issue Italian school curricula (Italian original version)
Carla Castellacci
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2006,
Abstract: Organized creationism is not widespread in Italy. It is a rather limited resource politicians and columnists draw upon when wishing to stir up a “debate”. Judging by its results, Italian creationism is old-fashioned, still comparing Darwin’s theories with the Bible, hoping to find the wreckage of Noah’s Ark, holding conferences on the origin of apes, questioning fossil dating and distorting science debates with out-of-context quotations from disparate sources. It is not a lobby that could obtain considerable electoral support, win favour or drag scientists to court.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.