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Multipurpose soft contact lens care in Japan  [cached]
Toshida H,Kadota Y,Suto C,Ohta T
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012,
Abstract: Hiroshi Toshida1,2, Yoshiaki Kadota3, Chikako Suto2, Toshihiko Ohta1, Akira Murakami21Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Shizuoka, 2Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, 3Bausch & Lomb Japan Co, Ltd, Research and Development, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To assess the use of multipurpose lens care products via an online survey conducted among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in Japan.Methods: The subjects were 1000 men and women aged 15–44 years who reported that they cleaned their SCL by using multipurpose solution at least twice a week. Via the internet, they were asked questions about SCL care, the use of a rubbing step when cleaning SCL, cleaning and replacing lens cases, and recommended SCL care methods.Results: Of the 1000 SCL wearers enrolled, 94.3% performed lens care every day lenses were worn, 64.2% reported rubbing the lenses every time, 57.9% rubbed the lenses for at least 10 seconds per side, and 64.7% reported they rubbed the lenses on both sides. Further, 61.2% reported that they had been given an explanation of SCL cleaning at an eye clinic or contact lens store. Only 49.8% of subjects reported that they cleaned the lens case every time and 61.7% replaced the case within 3 months. Only 19.5% had been given an explanation about lens case care. Half of the subjects reported they had been given no recommendation to use specific SCL care products or could not remember whether or not they had. The most common reason for the recommendation was good compatibility with their type of lens.Conclusion: More education is needed in Japan regarding methods of SCL care to ensure correct lens cleaning with inclusion of a rubbing step, as well as sufficient cleaning and replacement of the lens case. Of particular interest is the finding that many subjects were not given an explanation about proper SCL care and lens case cleaning and replacement at the time of lens purchase or prescription.Keywords: soft contact lens, multipurpose solutions, compliance, questionnaire survey, contact lens care
Multipurpose soft contact lens care in Japan
Toshida H, Kadota Y, Suto C, Ohta T, Murakami A
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S28332
Abstract: ltipurpose soft contact lens care in Japan Original Research (4908) Total Article Views Authors: Toshida H, Kadota Y, Suto C, Ohta T, Murakami A Published Date January 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 139 - 144 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S28332 Received: 17 November 2011 Accepted: 01 December 2011 Published: 18 January 2012 Hiroshi Toshida1,2, Yoshiaki Kadota3, Chikako Suto2, Toshihiko Ohta1, Akira Murakami2 1Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Shizuoka, 2Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, 3Bausch & Lomb Japan Co, Ltd, Research and Development, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: To assess the use of multipurpose lens care products via an online survey conducted among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in Japan. Methods: The subjects were 1000 men and women aged 15–44 years who reported that they cleaned their SCL by using multipurpose solution at least twice a week. Via the internet, they were asked questions about SCL care, the use of a rubbing step when cleaning SCL, cleaning and replacing lens cases, and recommended SCL care methods. Results: Of the 1000 SCL wearers enrolled, 94.3% performed lens care every day lenses were worn, 64.2% reported rubbing the lenses every time, 57.9% rubbed the lenses for at least 10 seconds per side, and 64.7% reported they rubbed the lenses on both sides. Further, 61.2% reported that they had been given an explanation of SCL cleaning at an eye clinic or contact lens store. Only 49.8% of subjects reported that they cleaned the lens case every time and 61.7% replaced the case within 3 months. Only 19.5% had been given an explanation about lens case care. Half of the subjects reported they had been given no recommendation to use specific SCL care products or could not remember whether or not they had. The most common reason for the recommendation was good compatibility with their type of lens. Conclusion: More education is needed in Japan regarding methods of SCL care to ensure correct lens cleaning with inclusion of a rubbing step, as well as sufficient cleaning and replacement of the lens case. Of particular interest is the finding that many subjects were not given an explanation about proper SCL care and lens case cleaning and replacement at the time of lens purchase or prescription.
Dendritic immune cell densities in the central cornea associated with soft contact lens types and lens care solution types: a pilot study  [cached]
Sindt CW,Grout TK,Critser DB,Kern JR
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012,
Abstract: Christine W Sindt1, Trudy K Grout1, D Brice Critser1, Jami R Kern2, David L Meadows21University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA; 2Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to assess whether differences in central corneal dendritic immune cell densities associated with combinations of soft contact lenses and lens care solutions could be detected by in vivo confocal microscopy.Methods: Participants were adults na ve to contact lens wear (n = 10) or who wore soft contact lenses habitually on a daily-wear schedule (n = 38) or on a study-assigned schedule for 30 days with daily disposable silicone hydrogel lenses (n = 15). Central corneas were scanned using an in vivo confocal microscope. Cell densities were compared among groups by demographic parameters, lens materials, and lens care solutions (polyhexamethylene biguanide [PHMB], polyquaternium-1 and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine [PQ/MAPD], peroxide, or blister pack solution [for daily disposable lenses]).Results: Among lens wearers, no associations were observed between immune cell densities and age, gender, or years of lens-wearing experience. Mean cell density was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in nonwearers (29 ± 23 cells/mm2, n = 10) than in lens wearers (64 ± 71 cells/mm2, n = 53). Mean cell density was lower (P = 0.21) with traditional polymer lenses (47 ± 44 cells/mm2, n = 12) than with silicone hydrogel lenses (69 ± 77 cells/mm2, n = 41). Lowest to highest mean density of immune cells among lens wearers was as follows: PQ/MAPD solution (49 ± 28 cells/mm2), blister pack solution (63 ± 81 cells/mm2), PHMB solution (66 ± 44 cells/mm2), and peroxide solution (85 ± 112 cells/mm2).Conclusion: In this pilot study, in vivo confocal microscopy was useful for detecting an elevated immune response associated with soft contact lenses, and for identifying lens-related and solution-related immune responses that merit further research.Keywords: Clear Care, in vivo confocal microscopy, Langerhans, Opti-Free Replenish, ReNu Multi-Plus
Dendritic immune cell densities in the central cornea associated with soft contact lens types and lens care solution types: a pilot study
Sindt CW, Grout TK, Critser DB, Kern JR, Meadows DL
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S28083
Abstract: dritic immune cell densities in the central cornea associated with soft contact lens types and lens care solution types: a pilot study Original Research (2047) Total Article Views Authors: Sindt CW, Grout TK, Critser DB, Kern JR, Meadows DL Published Date March 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 511 - 519 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S28083 Received: 09 November 2011 Accepted: 20 December 2011 Published: 28 March 2012 Christine W Sindt1, Trudy K Grout1, D Brice Critser1, Jami R Kern2, David L Meadows2 1University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA; 2Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to assess whether differences in central corneal dendritic immune cell densities associated with combinations of soft contact lenses and lens care solutions could be detected by in vivo confocal microscopy. Methods: Participants were adults na ve to contact lens wear (n = 10) or who wore soft contact lenses habitually on a daily-wear schedule (n = 38) or on a study-assigned schedule for 30 days with daily disposable silicone hydrogel lenses (n = 15). Central corneas were scanned using an in vivo confocal microscope. Cell densities were compared among groups by demographic parameters, lens materials, and lens care solutions (polyhexamethylene biguanide [PHMB], polyquaternium-1 and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine [PQ/MAPD], peroxide, or blister pack solution [for daily disposable lenses]). Results: Among lens wearers, no associations were observed between immune cell densities and age, gender, or years of lens-wearing experience. Mean cell density was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in nonwearers (29 ± 23 cells/mm2, n = 10) than in lens wearers (64 ± 71 cells/mm2, n = 53). Mean cell density was lower (P = 0.21) with traditional polymer lenses (47 ± 44 cells/mm2, n = 12) than with silicone hydrogel lenses (69 ± 77 cells/mm2, n = 41). Lowest to highest mean density of immune cells among lens wearers was as follows: PQ/MAPD solution (49 ± 28 cells/mm2), blister pack solution (63 ± 81 cells/mm2), PHMB solution (66 ± 44 cells/mm2), and peroxide solution (85 ± 112 cells/mm2). Conclusion: In this pilot study, in vivo confocal microscopy was useful for detecting an elevated immune response associated with soft contact lenses, and for identifying lens-related and solution-related immune responses that merit further research.
The Level Of Contact Lens Practice In Port Harcourt, Rivers State Of Nigeria.
OU Amaechi, E Nwokeocha
Journal of the Nigerian Optometric Association , 2009,
Abstract: The level of contact lens practice in Port Harcourt, Rivers State of Nigeria was investigated. The instruments of research were field work/direct observation, oral interviews of eye care practitioners, andthe assessment of clinical records of the contact lens patients from 2003 to 2006. Thirty five eye care practices were studied. The level of contact lens practice was assessed based on the number of clinics offering contact lens services, the number of eye care practitioners involved in contact lens services, the availability of essential instruments required for contact lens care, the percentage of patients prescribed contact lenses, and the annual contact lens patient flow in those clinics. Results showed that eleven(31.43%) of the eye care practices offer contact lens services, and seventeen (36.96%) eye care practitioners were involved in contact lens services. The level of contact lens practice based on the availability of retinoscope, trial case, and diagnostic contact lenses was very high (100.00%), and it was also high based on the availability of slit lamp biomicroscope 72.73%) and keratometer (63.64%). The percentage of patients corrected with contact lenses was very low (7.60%). The annual contact lens patient flowincreased from244 in 2003 to 345 in 2006 (a 41.40%increase) Enthusiasmon the part of the eye care practitioners incontact lens practice, andcreatingthe proper awarenesswouldboost the level of contact lens practice.
Gram negative bacteria and contact lens induced acute red eye  [cached]
Sankaridurg Padmaja,Vuppala Nagesh,Sreedharan Athmanathan,Vadlamudi Jyothi
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1996,
Abstract: Two patients using hydrogel contact lenses on a daily wear schedule slept overnight with the lenses and woke up with a Contact Lens Induced Acute Red Eye (CLARE). The contact lenses recovered aseptically at the time of the event grew significant colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila in patient A and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia liquefaciens from patient B. Similar organisams from the contact lenses were recovered from the lens case and lens care solutions of patient B. In both the patients the condition resolved on discontinuation of lens wear. Patient compliance as a requirement for successful contact lens wear is highlighted with the illustration of these cases.
Quantitation of microbicidal activity of mononuclear phagocytes: an in vitro technique.  [cached]
Rege N,Dahanukar S
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine , 1993,
Abstract: An in vitro assay technique was set up to determine the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of a monocyte-macrophage cell line using Candida species as test organisms. The norms were determined for the activity of peritoneal macrophages of rats (24.69 +/- 2.6% phagocytosis and 35.4 +/- 5.22% ICK) and human (27.89 +/- 3.63% phagocytosis and 50.91 +/- 6.3% ICK). The assay technique was used to test the degree of activation of macrophages induced by metronidazole, Tinospora cordifolia and Asparaqus racemousus and to compare their effects with a standard immunomodulator muramyl-dipeptide. All the three test agents increased the phagocytic and killing capacity of macrophages in a dose dependent manner upto a certain dose, beyond which either these activities were found to have plateaued or decreased. The optimal doses for MDP, Metronidazole, Asparagus racemosus and Tinospora cordifolia were found to be 100 micrograms, 300 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg respectively. Patients with cirrhosis were screened for defects in monocyte function. The depressed monocyte function (20.58 +/- 5% phago and 41.24 +/- 12.19% ICK; P < 0.05) was observed indicating a compromised host defense. The utility of this candidicidal assay in experimental and clinical studies is discussed.
Tight Contact Structures on Lens Spaces  [PDF]
John Etnyre
Mathematics , 1998,
Abstract: In this paper we develop a method for studying tight contact structures on lens spaces. We then derive uniqueness and non-existence statements for tight contact structures with certain (half) Euler classes on lens spaces. We also prove that any lens space admits only finitely many tight contact structures.
Sterility and the disinfection potential of Indian contact lens solutions  [cached]
Gopinathan Usha,Sharma Savitri,Boghani Shobha,Rao Gullapalli
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1994,
Abstract: Ocular infection associated with microbial contamination of contact lens care products is a major problem in contact lens wearers. The sterility and the antimicrobial activity of contact lens care systems reflect their suitability for disinfection of contact lenses. These factors remain to be evaluated for the various newer contact lens care products manufactured in India. In this study, 35 bottles of contact lens solutions marketed by different manufacturing units in India were tested for sterility. Seven solutions were tested for antimicrobial effectiveness employing the D value method of analysis. The D value is defined as the time required to reduce a population of organisms by 90% (one log unit). A standard inoculum of the ocular isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Aspergillus fumigatus, Fusarium solani, and Acanthamoeba castellanii were used as challenge organisms. Bacterial contamination was detected in 20 (57.1%) solution bottles and none yielded fungus or Acanthamoeba. Pseudomonas species were the most commonly encountered contaminant (11/20; 55%). Only sterile solutions were analyzed for antimicrobial activity. D values ranging between 12 and 20 minutes were demonstrated by six of the seven solutions against bacterial challenge. Good antifungal activity was noticed in five solutions against Fusarium solani though results varied with Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. All solutions were adequately effective against Acanthamoeba.
Sterilization potential of contact lens solutions  [cached]
Dada Vijay,Mehta Manoj
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1988,
Abstract: In a dynamic field of Contact Lens Solutions maintenance of high standards of anti-microbial activity is a must Resterilization Activity Time′ is a universally accepted yardstick for such an evaluation. In this study eight brands of indigenous popular solutions alongwith two FDA approved solutions were tested for their sterilization efficacy: Standardized suspensions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus were used for the purpose. It was observed that the contact lens solutions available ir, the domestic market were not upto the mark Suggestions for improvement have also been made.
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