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Complications of the Ultrasound-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Kidney in Dogs
Ali Rezaie,Ghafour Mousavi,Daryoush Mohajeri,Gholamreza Asadnasab
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012,
Abstract: Percutaneous needle biopsy of the kidney may be helpful in formulating prognoses and treatment plans for some disease of kidney. Ultrasound guidance for renal biopsy improves the efficacy of the procedure. Complications of renal biopsy include hematuria, hemorrhage, infection, local peritonitis and severe circulatory dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the technique and the possible complications of biochemical, hematological, radiological, ultrasonographical and pathological changes after ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the kidney. Ten adult dogs were used, an 18 gauge Vim Tru Cut biopsy needle was introduced into the cranial pole of the right kidney using sonographic guidance. Clinical, ultrasonography and radiology, hemathological, biochemical and pathological changes were evaluated after biopsy procedure. All the biopsy samples contained renal tissue. Clinical evaluations showed that changes were all within normal reference ranges. Ultrasonographically and radiologicallly evaluations showed that no changes in kidney sizes. The results of hematological and biochemical evaluations showed that no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) between blood samples performed pre-biopsy and post-biopsy was found during the study. The results of this study indicate that the ultrasound-guided renal biopsy can be safely obtained from healthy dogs using 18-gauge Vim Tru Cut biopsy needle. Our study suggests that ultrasound-guided renal needle biopsy procedure has a minimal complication in dogs.
CT Guided Needle Biopsy as a Less Invasive Procedure in Diagnosis of Thoracic Lesions.
Pooyeh Graili,Soheyla Zahirifard,Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram
Iranian Journal of Radiology , 2009,
Abstract: "nIntroduction: This study was designed to diagnose and assess different variables of benign and malignant masses on CT-guided biopsy and to identify the complication rate of the procedure. "nMaterials and Methods: 757 patients with thoracic lesions whom underwent CT-guided biopsy were evaluated retrospectively from March 2004 to December 2008. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist. The CTs were assessed by a trained general practitioner for the size and location of the lesions and pneumothorax diagnosis and then all CTs were double checked by the same radiologist. Lesions were considered benign or malignant based on pathology reports. "nResults: Biopsy yielded sufficient tissue for pathologic examination in 622 cases (82.2%); 244 lesions (29.6) were benign and 388 lesions (51.3%) were malignant (in which 27 were small cell and 233 were non-small cell tumors). The most prevalent location of the lesions was the right upper lobe (182). 78 masses were located in the mediastinum and 41 were in the chest wall. 44.2% of the benign lesions were of an infectious cause (69.7% bacterial, 20.2% fungal, 6.1% hydatid cyst and 4% TB) and the rest were inflammatory (43.8%), granulomatous (5.8%) and neoplastic (6.2%) masses. The mean sizes of benign and malignant lesions were 6.011 and 7.481 cm, respectively (P.V. <0.05). The mean of small cell tumor size was 8.944 cm in comparison with 7.225 cm in non-small cell tumors. Complication arose in 40 cases; pneumothorax occurred in 37 (4.9%) and bleeding in 3 (0.4%) patients. The large masses and closer lesions to the chest wall showed fewer complications compared to small and distant masses (P.V. <0.05). "nConclusion: CT guided needle biopsy seems to be a reliable diagnostic modality with low risk probablity of complications for thoracic lesions.
Reducing infectious complications after transrectal prostate needle biopsy using a disposable needle guide: is it possible?
Gurbuz, Cenk;Canat, Lutfi;Atis, Gokhan;Caskurlu, Turhan;
International braz j urol , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S1677-55382011000100010
Abstract: purpose: to investigate whether the use of a disposable needle guide results in a decreased incidence of infectious complication after transrectal prostate needle biopsy (tpnb). materials and methods: fifty five patients who underwent 10-core tpnb were randomized into two groups. a pre-biopsy blood and urine examination was performed in both groups. group 1 (25 patients) underwent biopsy with disposable biopsy needle guide and group 2 (30 patients) underwent biopsy with reusable biopsy needle guide. all patients had a blood and negative urine culture before the procedure. the patients received ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice a day beginning the day before the biopsy and continued for 3 days after. serum c-reactive protein levels and urine and blood specimens were obtained 48h after the biopsy. primary endpoint of the study was to determine the effect of needle guide on the bacteriologic urinary tract infection (uti) rate and secondary end point was to determine symptomatic uti. results: the mean age of the patients was 63.46 (range 55 to 68) years. there were no significant differences regarding the prostate-specific antigen level, prostate size, existence of comorbidity in two groups before the procedure. bacteriologic and symptomatic uti was detected in 4% vs. 6.6% and 4% vs. 3.9% in group 1 and 2 relatively (p > 0.05). conclusion: the use of a disposable needle guide does not appear to minimize infection risk after tpnb. large scale and randomized studies are necessary to determine the effect of disposable needle guide on infection rate after tpnb.
Fungus Ball Diagnosed on Computed Tomography (CT) Guided Needle Aspiration and Biopsy of Thoracic Lesions
Sepideh Rouhi,Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram
Iranian Journal of Radiology , 2010,
Abstract: Background/Objective: CT-guided biopsy provides results in a short period and can be applied on outpatient and even high-risk patients; however, some studies do not recommend it in lesions with benign histology probability. The purpose was to report our experience regarding fungus ball diagnosis on CT-guided biopsy and to identify the complication rate of the procedure. "nPatients and Methods: We evaluated 99 CT-guided biopsies of infected thoracic lesions performed from March 2004 to December 2008 retrospectively. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist with Westcott needle number 20 and 18. The CTs were assessed by a trained general practitioner for the size and location of lesions and diagnosis of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum, then all CTs were double checked by the same radiologist. Diagnosis of fungus lesions and their differentiations were based on pathology reports. "nResults: During this four-year study, 20 fungus lesions (15 men and five women) were found. The mean age of the patients were 54.75 years (ranging: 19-77). In these series, there were 16 (80%) aspergillosis, two (10%) mucor mycosis and two undifferentiated fungus balls. The mean diameter of the lesions was 5.650 cm (range: 1-11.5 cm) and the distance of the lesions to the chest wall was 0.75 cm (range: 0-3 cm). Nine (45%) fungus lesions were located in the left upper, four (20%) in the right lower, four (20%) in the right upper and the rest (15%) in the left lower and right middle lobes. Pneumothorax occurred in two cases (one aspergillosis and one mucor mycosis), while the chest tube was placed only for the patient with mucor mycosis in order to manage the compli-cation. "nConclusion: CT-guided needle biopsy seems to be a safe and feasible diagnostic modality with a low-risk probability of complications for fungus balls.
Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed on Computed Tomography (CT) Guided Needle Aspiration and Biopsy of Thoracic Lesions
Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram,Sepideh Rouhi
Iranian Journal of Radiology , 2010,
Abstract: Background/Objective: CT-guided biopsy provides results in a short period and can be applied on outpatient and even high-risk patients; however, some studies do not recommend it in lesions with probable benign histology. The objective was to report our experience regarding hydatid cyst diagnosis on CT-guided biopsy and to identify the complication rate of procedure. "nPatients and Methods: We evaluated 99 CT-guided biopsies of infected thoracic lesions performed to investigate hydatid cyst masses from March 2004 to December 2008 retrospectively. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist with Westcott needle number 20 and 18. The CT scans were assessed by a trained general practitioner for the size and location of the lesions and diagnosis of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum and then all CT scans were double checked by the same radiologist. Lesions considered infection and their differentiations based on pathology reports. "nResults: During this four year study six hydatid cysts (three men and three women) were found the men age of the patients was 49.83 years (ranging: 25-81). The mean diameter of the lesions was 4.083 cm (range: 1-6 cm) and the distance of the lesion to the chest wall was 0.417 cm (range: 0-1.5 cm). In these cases, three (50%) hydatid cysts were located in the left lower lobe, two (33.3%) in the left upper lobe and one (16.7%) in the mediastinum. Pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum as complications did not present in any case. "nConclusion: CT-guided needle biopsy seems to be a safe and feasible diagnostic modality with a low-risk probability of complications for hydatid cysts.
Tuberculosis and Other Infectious Diseases Diagnosed on Computed Tomography (CT) Guided Needle Aspiration and Biopsy of Thoracic Lesions
Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram,Sepideh Rouhi
Iranian Journal of Radiology , 2010,
Abstract: Background/Objective: CT-guided biopsy provides results in a short period and can be applied on outpatient and even high-risk patients. The aim was to report our experience regarding infectious lesion diagnosis on CT-guided biopsy and to identify the complication rate of procedure. "nPatients and Methods: We evaluated 224 CT-guided biopsies of benign thoracic lesions performed from March 2004 to December 2008 retrospectively. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist with Westcott needle number 20 and 18. The CT scans were assessed by a trained general practitioner for the size and location of lesions and diagnosis of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum and then all CT scans were double checked by the same radiologist. Lesions considered benign and the differentiations based on pathology reports. "nResults: In this series, 99 (44.2%) infectious, 98 inflammatory, 14 neoplastic and 13 granulomatous lesions were found. In the infectious lesion group, 73 (73.7%) of the lesions were bacterial, 20 (20.2%) were fungal and six (6.1%) were hydatid cysts. The location of the cases are as follows; 29 (29.3%) in the right lower, 24 (24.2%) in the left upper, 20 (20.2%) in the right upper lobes and 26 were in other locations. 26% in the right middle, left lower lobes, mediastinum and the chest wall. The mean diameter of infectious masses and the distance of the lesions to the chest wall were 6.187 cm and 0.348 cm, respectively. Moreover, four cases with Tuberculosis were detected in the right lower (2), right upper (1) and left upper (1) lobes. Pneumothorax occurred in four infectious lesions, while chest tube was placed for only one case. "nConclusion: CT-guided needle biopsy seems to be a safe and feasible diagnostic modality with a low-risk probability of complications for infectious diseases.
Predictors of Malignant Pathology and the Role of Trans-Thoracic Needle Biopsy in Management of Solitary Fibrous Tumors of the Pleura: A 30-Year Review of a Tertiary Care Center Patient Cohort  [PDF]
Anna McGuire, Patrick J. Villeneuve, Harman Sekhon, Sebastien Gilbert, Sudhir Sundaresan, Donna E. Maziak, Andrew E. J. Seely, Farid M. Shamji
Open Journal of Thoracic Surgery (OJTS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/ojts.2016.64008
Abstract: Background: Solitary fibrous tumors of the pleura (SFTP) are rare neoplasms with unpredictable behavior. Lack of unifying criteria for benign or malignant SFTP has resulted in reports of SFTP exhibiting malignant behavior years after complete surgical resection (despite benign initial diagnosis). Additionally, the role of trans-thoracic needle biopsy in initial management of SFTP is unclear. Understanding predictors of malignancy identifies patients at unacceptably high risk for non-surgical primary therapy, and for recurrence despite complete surgical resection. Objectives: The primary objectives were to identify clinicopathological predictors of malignancy & recurrence in SFTP. The secondary aim was to determine the role of trans-thoracic needle biopsy in the management decision algorithm of SFTP. Methods: Retrospective chart review was conducted (Jan. 1983-Dec. 2013) at the Ottawa Hospital for pathologically confirmed SFTP. Data were collected on biopsy-related, clinical, histopathological & immunohistochemistry (IHC) variables. Appropriate tests of statistical inference were conducted for all variables. Results: Pathologically confirmed SFTP was identified in 26 cases. Transthoracic needle biopsy was conducted in 22 (84.6%); with 16 (72.7%) biopsies diagnostic of SFTP with IHC; 3 (13.6%) being malignant. Primary management was surveillance in 3 and complete surgical resection in 23. Surgical pathology reported 15 (65.2%) benign and 8 (34.8%) malignant cases. Local recurrence occurred in 3 and distant recurrence in 1. Initial pathology was benign in 3 (75%) with recurrence. Clinicopathologic variables analyzed did not predict recurrent disease. IHC features did not differ between malignant & benign pathology significantly. Predictors of malignant pathology included: infiltrative cellular pattern (p = 0.042), nuclear crowding (p = 0.006), tumour necrosis (p < 0.001) and >4 mitoses/ 10 high power field (p < 0.003). Conclusion: Because numerous variables analyzed did not predict recurrent disease, long-term follow-up is warranted regardless of benign or malignant initial histology. Histologic not IHC features predicted malignant pathology. Trans-thoracic needle biopsy did identify malignant SFTP; however its main use should be to differentiate SFTP from other pleural neoplasms using IHC.
Complications, disease profile and histological yield from percutaneous renal biopsy under real-time US guidance: A retrospective analysis
M Kruger, E Loggenberg
South African Journal of Radiology , 2011,
Abstract: Objective. The objective of the study was to evaluate (i) the technique used at Universitas Hospital in comparison with other international centres also performing renal biopsies, (ii) the disease profile in patients undergoing renal biopsies, (iii) the complications experienced during and/or after the procedure, and (iv) the histological yield of the biopsies (amount of nephrons per biopsy taken) using this technique. Design. A retrospective descriptive analysis of all patients who underwent percutaneous renal biopsy under ultrasound (US) guidance at the Interventional Radiology Unit, Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein, was undertaken for the period 1 January 2003 - 31 December 2008. Data obtained from the patients’ files and histology reports were statistically analysed. Results. A total of 112 patients qualified for inclusion in the study, all of whom had proof of renal failure and then had percutaneous renal biopsy performed under US guidance. The histology was diagnostic in 111 (99.1%) of the cases, with more than 5 nephrons present in 105 (93.5%) of the cases. Minor complications were found in 29 (25.8%) of the patients, but no major complications were noted. Primary renal disease was found in 67 (59.8%) of patients, and the renal pathology and failure in 45 (40.2%) of the patients were shown histologically to be owing to systemic disease. Conclusion. The technique utilised for performing percutaneous renal biopsy under US guidance at the Interventional Radiology Unit was shown to be safe, with a diagnostic histological yield comparable with international standards. A small majority or patients suffered primary renal disease in comparison with renal failure owing to systemic illness.
Fine needle aspiration biopsy of liver – an update
David C Chhieng
World Journal of Surgical Oncology , 2004, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7819-2-5
Abstract: Currently, there are several diagnostic procedures to obtain preoperative tissue diagnosis to guide subsequent therapy. They include image guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, blind percutaneous needle core biopsy, and transjugular needle core biopsy. Percutaneous needle core biopsy without imaging guidance is excellent for diagnosing diffuse liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metabolic diseases. Accuracy is superb and the complication rate is low. However, it is not indicated for focal, discrete hepatic lesions. To minimize the risk of hemorrhage, transjugular approach is often reserved for patients with a bleeding diathesis. Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) under image guidance has gained increasing acceptance as the diagnostic procedure of choice for patients with focal hepatic lesions. It can be performed percutaneously or endoscopically. The latter approach is technically difficult for lesions located far away from the tip of the echoenodoscope and lesion near the 2nd or 3rd portion of the duodenum because of poor visualization [1]. FNA may also be performed at laparoscopy or laparotomy under direct vision when imaged guided FNA fails to provide diagnostic tissue [2].This review is not intended to be exhaustive. Therefore, the discussion is limited to the lesions that are more commonly encountered in day-to-day practice and those that may pose diagnostic challenges.In experienced hands, FNA is safe, minimally invasive, accurate, and cost effective. The specificity of FNA biopsy of the liver approaches 100% and the sensitivity ranges from 67–100%, averaging about 85% [3-9]. FNA alone is superior to core biopsy alone because the needle is longer, can be guided, and the procedure can be easily repeated [10,11]. However, both methods are complimentary to each other [10,12,13].The occurrence of complications after hepatic FNA is rare with about 0.5% minor complications, 0.05% major complications requiring surgery, and less than 0.01% mortality [14-
Transthoracic biopsy with core cutting needle for the diagnosis of mediastinal tumors
Zamboni, Mauro;Lannes, Deborah C.;Roriz, Walter;Cavalcanti, Aureliano;Torquato, Emanuel B.;Biasi, Samuel Z. de;Toscano, Edson;
Jornal de Pneumologia , 2003, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-35862003000300006
Abstract: objective: to determine the contribution of percutaneous biopsy with core cutting needle in the diagnosis of mediastinal tumors. method: retrospective review of 22 patients with mediastinal lesions who were submitted to percutaneous core cutting needle biopsy, oriented, but not guided by computer assisted tomography of the thorax, between 1999 and 2002. results: percutaneous biopsy with core cutting needle provided adequate material in 18/22 cases, with a total positive sample rate of 82%. in 4/22 cases, the material was insufficient to define the diagnosis (18%). percutaneous core cutting needle biopsy established a specific histologic diagnosis in 82% of the patients: 8/22 (36%) lymphoma; 5/22 (28%) thymoma; 2/22 (11%) thymic carcinoma; 1/22 (6%) metastatic adenocarcinoma; 1/22 (6%) neuroectodermic primitive tumor; and 1/22 (6%) plasmocytoma. all the patients were submitted to a thoracic x-ray after the biopsy. no complications were found in these patients. conclusion: percutaneous core cutting needle biopsy oriented, but not guided by computer assisted tomography of the thorax, is an easy and safe procedure which can provide a precise diagnosis in most mediastinal tumors, and can prevent the exploratory thoracic surgery in inoperable or chemotherapy-treated cases.
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