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Prevalence of Female Sexual Dysfunction among Women with Pelvic Organ Prolapse Diagnosed by Pisq-12 and Related Factors in Hung Vuong Hospital, Vietnam  [PDF]
Huynh Nguyen Khanh Trang, Pham Hung Cuong, Hoang Thi Diem Tuyet
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OJOG) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2019.97098
Abstract: Pelvic organ prolapsed is a common problem today, and it has been gradually increasing because of the longevity of women. Pelvic organ prolapse can result in negative psychological feelings that affect on women’s sexual activity. Methods: There is a cross-sectional study on sexual dysfunction in 296 women with pelvic organ prolapse grade II and III followed up at gynecological-pelvic floor unit of Hung Vuong hospital from 09/2017 to 06/2018. Results: The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction in PISQ-12 was 76.4% and 95% CI [71.6 - 81.2]. The rate of female sexual dysfunction in turn is: 1) Behavioral-Emotional: 93.6% 95% CI [90.8 - 96.4]. 2) Physiology: 62.2% CI 95% [56.7 - 67.7]. 3) Relationship to partner: 89.5% 95% CI [86.0 - 93.0]. Factor related to sexual dysfunction in women with pelvic organs (p < 0.05) is general sexual dysfunction: 1) Age group: women over age 55 increased generally the risk of sexual dysfunction, OR = 5.89, 95% CI [1.38 - 25.20]. 2) Diabetes mellitus increased the risk of sexual dysfunction with OR = 5.03, 95% CI [1.42 - 17.82]. 3) Patients with previous abortions reduced the risk of sexual dysfunction with OR = 0.49 95% CI [0.27 - 0.90]. Conclusion: Research on quality of life in pelvic organ prolapse should be considered more in the future.
Cardiac dysfunction in the diabetic rat: quantitative evaluation using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging
Rajprasad Loganathan, Mehmet Bilgen, Baraa Al-Hafez, Mohammed D Alenezy, Irina V Smirnova
Cardiovascular Diabetology , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2840-5-7
Abstract: In this study, we used high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the left ventricular functional characteristics of streptozotocin treated diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks disease duration) in comparison with age/sex matched controls.Our analyses of EKG gated cardiac MRI scans of the left ventricle showed a 28% decrease in the end-diastolic volume and 10% increase in the end-systolic volume of diabetic hearts compared to controls. Mean stroke volume and ejection fraction in diabetic rats were decreased (48% and 28%, respectively) compared to controls. Further, dV/dt changes were suggestive of phase sensitive differences in left ventricular kinetics across the cardiac cycle between diabetic and control rats.Thus, the MRI analyses of diabetic left ventricle suggest impairment of diastolic and systolic hemodynamics in this rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Our studies also show that in vivo MRI could be used in the evaluation of cardiac dysfunction in this rat model of type 1 diabetes.Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by a cascade of myocardial changes that occurs in diabetes mellitus with fibrosis, hypertrophy and microcirculatory abnormalities. These cardiovascular complications compromise cardiac performance ultimately resulting in cardiac failure. A high prevalence of cardiac failure is seen in individuals with diabetic cardiovascular complications, with DCM as one of the key determinants [1]. DCM is marked by diastolic dysfunction early in the disease progression [2-4], with its reported occurrence even in patients with well-controlled diabetes in the absence of clinically detectable cardiac disease [5]. In addition reports also suggest subtle systolic dysfunction later during the course of diabetes that evades detection with echocardiography [2]. Meanwhile it has been suggested that detection of systolic dysfunction might require highly sensitive techniques [3].Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven to be a powerful and ro
Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction: Sexual Dysfunction - Part III  [cached]
Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj,Nagesh Brahmavar Pai,Satheesh Rao
Online Journal of Health & Allied Sciences , 2009,
Abstract: Satisfying sexual experience is an essential part of a healthy and enjoyable life for most people. Antipsychotic drugs are among the various factors that affect optimal sexual functioning. Both conventional and novel antipsychotics are associated with significant sexual side effects. This review has presented various studies comparing different antipsychotic drugs. Dopamine antagonism, increased serum prolactin, serotonergic, adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are all proposed to be the mechanisms for sexual dysfunction. Drug treatment for this has not given satisfactory long-term results. Knowledge of the receptor pharmacology of an individual antipsychotic will help to determine whether it is more or less likely to cause sexual side effects and its management.
Biology of Sexual Dysfunction  [cached]
Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj,Nagesh Brahmavar Pai,Telkar Srinivasrao Sathyanarayana Rao,Nishant Goyal
Online Journal of Health & Allied Sciences , 2009,
Abstract: Sexual activity is a multifaceted activity, involving complex interactions between the nervous system, the endocrine system, the vascular system and a variety of structures that are instrumental in sexual excitement, intercourse and satisfaction. Sexual function has three components i.e., desire, arousal and orgasm. Many sexual dysfunctions can be categorized according to the phase of sexual response that is affected. In actual clinical practice however, sexual desire, arousal and orgasmic difficulties more often than not coexist, suggesting an integration of phases. Sexual dysfunction can result from a wide variety of psychological and physiological causes including derangements in the levels of sex hormones and neurotrensmitters. This review deals with the biology of different phases of sexual function as well as implications of hormones and neurotransmitters in sexual dysfunction
Etiology and Management of Sexual Dysfunction  [cached]
Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj,Nagesh Brahmavar Pai,Raveesh Bevinahalli Nanjegowda,Rajendra Rajagopal
Online Journal of Health & Allied Sciences , 2009,
Abstract: Sexual dysfunction is the impairment or disruption of any of the three phases of normal sexual functioning, including loss of libido, impairment of physiological arousal and loss, delay or alteration of orgasm. Each one of these can be affected by an orchestra of factors like senility, medical and surgical illnesses, medications and drugs of abuse. Non-pharmacological therapy is the main stay in the treatment of sexual dysfunction and drugs are used as adjuncts for a quicker and better result. Management in many of the cases depends on the primary cause. Here is a review of the major etiological factors of sexual dysfunction and its management
Sexual Dysfunction in Epileptic Men  [cached]
Mohammadreza Nikoobakht,Mahmood Motamedi,Amirhossein Orandi,Alipasha Meysamie
Urology Journal , 2007,
Abstract: Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of sexual dysfunction among epileptic patients. Materials and Methods: Eighty married men between 22 and 50 years with a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy were enrolled in this study. Patients with other neurological diseases, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, underlying urogenital diseases, and impaired general health status were excluded. Furthermore, those with mental health problems were identified by the standardized General Health Questionnaire-28 and were excluded. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the disease were evaluated, and sexual function was assessed by the self-administered questionnaire of the International Index of Erectile Function-15 (IIEF-15). Results: Of 80 patients, 34 (42.5%) had erectile dysfunction. There were no differences between the patients in the 3 age groups in the IIEF scores. Type of seizure had a significant correlation with erectile function score (P = .008). None of the IIEF domains scores were different between the patients with controlled epilepsy and those with uncontrolled epilepsy during the previous 6 months. However, frequency of epileptic seizures (before treatment) correlated with the scores for erectile function (r = 0.31; P = .005), orgasmic function (r = 0.23; P = .04), and sexual desire (r = 0.24; P = .03). Conclusion: It seems that the main aspects of sexual activity such as erectile function, orgasmic function, and sexual desire are frequently impaired in epileptic patients. Our findings were also indicative of a higher risk of sexual dysfunction in patients with partial seizures.
Correlation of Infertility and Sexual Dysfunction
F. Abbasalizadeh,Z. Fardy-Azar,F. Ranjbar-Koucheksaray
Research Journal of Biological Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: Infertility may interact with a couple`s or individual`s sexuality and sexual expression. We performed this study to evaluate the correlation of infertility and sexual dysfunction. A prospective study was conducted on 384 infertile (Case) and 384 fertile women (Control) presenting to Tabriz Al-Zahra Hospital since Jun-Des 2005. Mean age of women in infertile group was 27.84±4.67 year and in fertile group was 27.38±5.45 years (PV = 0.213). Mean age of men in infertile group was 31.85±4.97 year and in fertile group was 30.08±6.36 years-old (PV< 0.001). The duration of infertility among infertile women was 6.34±2.67 years. Mean frequency of sexual contact rate in infertile patients was 4.01±1.25 per week and in fertile patients was 3.29±1.12 per week (PV< 0.001). Having the sexual drive (PV< 0.001), Arrive to sexual arousal (PV< 0.001), Ability of reach to orgasm (PV< 0.001) and Obtaining the satisfaction from sexual contact and orgasm (PV = 0.018) were significantly better in control group, but Achieving vaginal lubrication during intercourse was better in case group (PV< 0.001). Significant reverse correlation was found between rate of sexual contact per week and infertility duration (PV< 0.001) and also between partners age (separately) and rate of sexual contact per week (PV< 0.001) in infertile couples.
Correlation of Infertility and Sexual Dysfunction
F. Abbasalizadeh,Z. Fardy-Azar,F. Ranjbar-Koucheksaray
Research Journal of Biological Sciences , 2008,
Abstract: Infertility may interact with a couple`s or individual`s sexuality and sexual expression. We performed this study to evaluate the correlation of infertility and sexual dysfunction. A prospective study was conducted on 384 infertile (Case) and 384 fertile women (Control) presenting to Tabriz Al-Zahra Hospital since Jun-Des 2005. Mean age of women in infertile group was 27.84 ±4.67 year and in fertile group was 27.38 ±5.45 years (PV = 0.213). Mean age of men in infertile group was 31.85 ±4.97 year and in fertile group was 30.08 ±6.36 years-old (PV< 0.001). The duration of infertility among infertile women was 6.34 ±2.67 years. Mean frequency of sexual contact rate in infertile patients was 4.01 ±1.25 per week and in fertile patients was 3.29 ±1.12 per week (PV< 0.001). Having the sexual drive (PV< 0.001), Arrive to sexual arousal (PV< 0.001), Ability of reach to orgasm (PV< 0.001) and Obtaining the satisfaction from sexual contact and orgasm (PV = 0.018) were significantly better in control group, but Achieving vaginal lubrication during intercourse was better in case group (PV< 0.001). Significant reverse correlation was found between rate of sexual contact per week and infertility duration (PV< 0.001) and also between partners age (separately) and rate of sexual contact per week (PV< 0.001) in infertile couples.
Pharmacogenetics of SSRIs and Sexual Dysfunction  [PDF]
Liana Osis,Jeffrey R. Bishop
Pharmaceuticals , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/ph3123614
Abstract: Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common and disconcerting side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that often influences a patient’s desire to continue long-term antidepressant treatment. Studies specifically assessing changes in sexual well-being over time illustrate that the incidence of sexual side effects from SSRIs ranges from 20% to 70%, depending on the characteristics of the study sample assessed. Developing strategies to predict who may be at the highest risk for adverse changes in their sexual well-being is an important step in improving the quality of life and treatment of patients who require antidepressant therapy. Pharmacogenetic studies of SSRI-associated SD have identified associations between serotonin and glutamate system genes with aspects of SD. The results of studies investigating genetic variations in drug metabolism enzymes and their relationships to antidepressant-associated adverse effects have been mixed. Continued efforts to characterize the relationships between genetic markers and antidepressant outcomes, and to translate this knowledge to patient care, have the potential to significantly improve the empiric selection of antidepressant agents and to minimize the risk for intolerable side effects.
Prevalence of sexual dysfunction during pregnancy
Leite, Alessandra Plácido Lima;Campos, Ana Aurélia Salles;Dias, Antonio Roberto Cardoso;Amed, Abes Mahmed;De Souza, Eduardo;Camano, Luis;
Revista da Associa??o Médica Brasileira , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S0104-42302009000500020
Abstract: objective: this study aims to evaluate the sexual function and to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction among teenagers and adult women during pregnancy using the female sexual function index (fsfi). methods: a cohort study was conducted with 271 healthy pregnant women presenting a stable relationship with their partners. these women contributed to the survey since the laboratory diagnosis of their present pregnancy. anonymous questionnaires evaluated aspects of sexual activity and female sexual function. this last item was assessed through the fsfi questionnaire. results: the women sexual function showed a similar pattern during the first and second trimesters; however, it presented a significantly clear decrease in the third trimester. there was a significant difference in the scores of all fsfi domains when comparing the second and third trimesters. the sexual dysfunction among pregnant teenagers was rated 40.8% in the first trimester, 31.2% in the second and 63.2% in the third. for pregnant adults, the dysfunction was rated, respectively, 46.6%, 34.2% and 73.3%. conclusion: the sexual function is affected during pregnancy with a significant decrease in all fsfi domains in the third trimester considering both pregnant teenagers and adults. prevalence of sexual dysfunction is high during pregnancy and reaches higher levels in the third trimester in both age groups; however, teenagers presented better sexual function ratings.
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