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Towards a Reference Model for Open Access and Knowledge Sharing, Lessons from Systems Research
Paola Di Maio
International Journal of Computer Science Issues , 2011,
Abstract: The Open Access Movement has been striving to grant universal unrestricted access to the knowledge and data outputs of publicly funded research. leveraging the real time, virtually cost free publishing opportunities offered by the internet and the web. However, evidence suggests that in the systems engineering domain open access policies are largely ignored. This paper presents the rationale, methodology and results of an evidence based inquiry that investigates the dichotomy between policy and practice in Open Access (OA) of systems engineering research in the UK, explores entangled dimensions of the problem space from a socio-technical perspective, and issues a set of recommendations, including a reference model outline for knowledge sharing in systems research.
Towards a Reference Model for Open Access and Knowledge Sharing, Lessons from Systems Research  [PDF]
Paola Di Maio
Computer Science , 2011,
Abstract: The Open Access Movement has been striving to grant universal unrestricted access to the knowledge and data outputs of publicly funded research. leveraging the real time, virtually cost free publishing opportunities offered by the internet and the web. However, evidence suggests that in the systems engineering domain open access policies are not widely adopted. This paper presents the rationale, methodology and results of an evidence based inquiry that investigates the dichotomy between policy and practice in Open Access (OA) of systems engineering research in the UK, explores entangled dimensions of the problem space from a socio-technical perspective, and issues a set of recommendations, including a reference model outline for knowledge sharing in systems research
Open Access Economics  [cached]
Joseph Gelfer
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality , 2009,
Abstract: Open Access Economics
The Economics of Open Access Publishing  [cached]
Christian Zimmermann
Economic Analysis and Policy , 2009,
Abstract: This special issue of Economic Analysis and Policy is devoted to try and understand the academic publishing industry and in particular the recent move towards open access, as EAP has done in 2008. The various articles examine the motivations, the challenges and the roadblocks for authors, editors, publishers, libraries and readers. It also highlights some of the benefits of open access beyond the obvious increase in readership. Several examples from journal editors, content management providers and bibliographic data distributors are also provided.
The Stratified Economics of Open Access
John Willinsky
Economic Analysis and Policy , 2009,
Abstract: There is a growing recognition within the academic community that ‘open access’ to research and scholarship can increase its value and reach. A variety of open access models have developed over the last twenty years, including author self-archiving, immediate (sponsored) open access, delayed open access, and article-processing-fee open access. Yet the economics of open access is being largely determined, at this point, by the interests of a stratified scholarly publishing market that can be roughly divided among independent journals, scholarly society publishers, and commercial publishers. Each of these market segments is experimenting with forms of open access that hold promise for sustaining, if not extending, the segment’s current position. This paper reviews the economics of these open access models, while drawing attention to the consequences of this market stratification for access to knowledge and the sustainability of scholarly publishing as a whole.
The Open Access Divide  [PDF]
Jingfeng Xia
Publications , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/publications1030113
Abstract: This paper is an attempt to review various aspects of the open access divide regarding the difference between those academics who support free sharing of data and scholarly output and those academics who do not. It provides a structured description by adopting the Ws doctrines emphasizing such questions as who, what, when, where and why for information-gathering. Using measurable variables to define a common expression of the open access divide, this study collects aggregated data from existing open access as well as non-open access publications including journal articles and extensive reports. The definition of the open access divide is integrated into the discussion of scholarship on a larger scale.
Open Access Makes an Impact  [PDF]
Alexander B?ker
Polymers , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/polym5030954
Abstract: Polymers published its first issue in December 2009. At that time, the editorial board and publisher were determined to lead the journal to become another MDPI success story, proving that open access publishing and high quality publications, ensured by a rigorous peer-review procedure, followed by fast publication of accepted manuscripts can be achieved. Three and a half years later, after more than 153,000 article downloads in 2012, the journal received its first impact factor (2012 JCR IF: 1.687). Today, Polymers is proud to be the number one open access journal in the category of “Polymer Science”. In order to achieve this, we relied on an editorial board with well-known members from the polymer community, a professional staff and a vision that there is room alongside the established “high impact” journals for publishing science. Recently, the editor in chief of Science, Bruce Alberts, wrote an editorial [1] in favor of the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), which states that the impact factor must not be used as “a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles [2]”. Even though the impact factor certainly is so far the best available measure of the quality of a journal and its impact on the scientific community, when it comes to the single manuscripts published, “there is still no other way to evaluate the quality of scientific papers, but to read them [3]”. Therefore, Polymers celebrates its first impact factor with an appropriate critical distance towards bibliometric data and feels encouraged to continue on the chosen path. With this in mind, I encourage you, our readers, to continuously evaluate the scientific quality of the articles published in Polymers by reading, discussing and citing them.
Awareness and Use of Open Access Scholarly Publications by LIS Lecturers in Southern Nigeria
International Journal of Library Science , 2012, DOI: 10.5923/j.library.20120104.02
Abstract: The study examined the awareness and use of open access scholarly publications by Library and Information Science (LIS) lecturers in southern Nigeria. Based on this, three (3) objectives were set out for the study. The descriptive survey design was employed and the questionnaire entitled “Awareness and Use of Open Access to Scholarly Publications Questionnaire” (AUOASPQ) was administered on the entire population of 141 LIS lecturers from which 114 responses were successfully collected. The data collected were analyzed using frequency counts, percentages, mean and regression analysis. The study revealed a high level of usage of open access publications by both senior and junior LIS lecturers and that the awareness of open access concepts accounts for the tendency of LIS lecturers in southern Nigeria to use open access publications. The study recommends that efforts should be geared towards inculcating the awareness and use of open access especially through enabling infrastructure and enacting policies such as mandatory deposit of scholarly works in open access archives.
Editorial ~ Open Access in Action!  [cached]
Terry Anderson, Canada Research Chair in Distance Education
International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning , 2006,
Abstract: Mid 2006 finds the academic research community engaged in an ideological and fiscal war related to Open Access publishing. Open Access requires that the full text of publications be made available at no cost to anyone on the open Internet. Recent position and discussion papers in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and other countries, have called for dialogue amongst academics and strongly hinted that research supported by public funds should be made available freely to the general public. The resulting discussion has clearly split the academic community with both support and rejection of the notion from all sides of the politic and discipline spectra.IRRODL’s position is, as expected, to be solidly behind all moves to insure Open Access publication. We are proudly listed with the 2,256 other journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals and our publisher, Athabasca University, is a signature to the Budapest Open Access Initiative.
Open access and open source in chemistry
Matthew H Todd
Chemistry Central Journal , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1752-153x-1-3
Abstract: The internet continues to transform the way we do science. We can search very large digital repositories of literature effectively with great speed. We can disseminate our data effectively instantaneously by posting it on the web. We can argue and collaborate with communication tools that overcome the most serious physical obstacles. In this article we look at two broad themes of this change, open access and open source. This commentary marks a very significant development in open access chemistry publishing, the launch of the Chemistry Central Journal.One of the most significant impacts of the web is that it is essentially a structure that has emerged 'free of charge.' We pay for access, but seldom, as users, pay directly for the infrastructure. One of the world's most powerful computer systems is that operated by Google for managing its web searches [1]. Many of us use this tool daily to find information that ranges from the trivial (structure of a chemical, website URL of a colleague) to the more advanced (undergraduate teaching resources, commercial relevance of compounds). Yet the search engine, and the enormous infrastructure required to run it, is financed by advertising: we pay no access or subscription charges. Further, tools that are being developed as offshoots of the engine are also funded by this mechanism. One can download a desktop search tool free of charge that rapidly indexes all locally-saved PDF files, allowing us to search hundreds of relevant papers for the occurrence of particular chemical terms.The web is growing, as is the speed with which we can move around it. (The driving forces behind this are probably not academic scientific research). This has resulted in two significant new developments in the way we carry out formal scientific research. One is a mechanism of distributed collaboration called open source research. The other is a new way of publishing peer-reviewed research, known as open access.The term open access has come to mean dat
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