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Childhood physical abuse in outpatients with psychosomatic symptoms
Masanori Handa, Hideyuki Nukina, Masako Hosoi, Chiharu Kubo
BioPsychoSocial Medicine , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1751-0759-2-8
Abstract: We divided 564 consecutive new outpatients at the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine of Kyushu University Hospital into two groups: a physically abused group and a non-abused group. Psychological test scores and the prevalence of self-injurious behavior were compared between the two groups.A history of childhood physical abuse was reported by patients with depressive disorders(12.7%), anxiety disorders(16.7%), eating disorders (16.3%), pain disorders (10.8%), irritable bowel syndrome (12.5%), and functional dyspepsia(7.5%). In both the patients with depressive disorders and those with anxiety disorders, STAI-I (state anxiety) and STAI-II (trait anxiety) were higher in the abused group than in the non-abused group (p < 0.05).In the patients with depressive disorders, the abused group was younger than the non-abused group (p < 0.05). The prevalence of self-injurious behavior of the patients with depressive disorders, anxiety disorders and pain disorders was higher in the abused groups than in the non-abused groups (p < 0.005).A history of childhood physical abuse is associated with psychological distress such as anxiety, depression and self-injurious behavior in outpatients with psychosomatic symptoms. It is important for physicians to consider the history of abuse in the primary care of these patients.Reports of abuse and domestic violence have been increasing in Japan. However, few studies have been done of the prevalence of physical or sexual abuse history in Japan and Asia. In a large, national telephone survey of 1,145 men and 1,481 women in the United States, Finkelhor et al. reported the prevalence of child sexual abuse history to be 27% for women and 16% for men [1]. The American rate of physical abuse history has been estimated at 5.7 cases per 1000 children [2]. Drossman and Leserman reported a high prevalence of sexual and physical abuse history among female outpatients referred to a gastroenterology clinic [3]. They found that 44% of the studied women re
The Prevalence of Psychosomatic Symptoms and Spirituality Levels among University Students in South Jordan  [PDF]
Hani A. Nawafleh, Lourance A. Al Hadid, Muwafaq M. Al Momani, Ahmad M. Al Sayeh
Health (Health) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/health.2018.101009
Abstract: Psychosomatic symptoms are present in various stages of life. University students have also manifested such symptoms, which were also found to be linked to the level of spirituality affecting physical and psychological well-being. This study aims to examine whether spirituality can predict the presence of psychosomatic symptoms by investigating the relationship between the prevalence of psychosomatic symptoms and the level of spirituality among university students in South Jordan. An exploratory cross-sectional design involving convenience samples and self-administered questionnaires using the twelveitem general health questionnaire including spirituality-based items were used to collect data for this study. A total of 1269 completed the study questionnaire. Students’ responses indicated various psychosomatic symptoms causing issues to better academic achievement, including students’ feeling of uselessness, followed by their lack of happiness, inability to make decisions and solve problems, and lack of concentration on what they are doing. They considered spirituality as an important part of their life. Lower scores on general health questionnaire were observed to have higher scores on spirituality items indicating that students with better spirituality practices have less psychological symptoms. Based on the findings of this study, the level of spirituality influences the prevalence of psychosomatic symptoms. Conducting educational programs to improve the spiritual well-being of students could be beneficial. Further, it is important that students’ affairs board at the university perform proper assessment and interventions to improve the spirituality level to decrease the impact of psychosomatic symptoms among students.
Family Functioning and Illness Perception of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis, Living Without Skin Symptoms, but with Psychosomatic Symptoms
Alain. R. Rodríguez-Orozco,E. G. Kanán-Cedeno,E. Guillén Martinez,M. J. Campos Garibay
Iranian Journal Of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology , 2011,
Abstract: Emotional factors and a recurrent psychosomatic environment, have been implicated in the evolution of atopic dermatitis. These, in turn, affect the disease. This study was under taken to evaluate the functioning of families with a child that has atopic dermatitis without skin symptoms and the parents' perceptions of their child's disease.Semi-quantitative and cross-sectional study in which questionnaires were applied: one to study family functioning (Espejel et al. scale) and the second to determine aspects of parental perception of their child's atopic dermatitis. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze the correlation between the categories of the Family Function Scale.The most affected categories of family functioning were authority, handling of disruptive conduct, communication, and negative affect. The most significant positive correlations between the categories of family functioning were: authority and support, r=0.867, p<.001; disruptive conduct and communication, r=0.798, p<.001; and support and communication, r=0.731, p<.001. Of the parents, 66.4% thought that the pharmacotherapy used for their child's atopic dermatitis was not effective, and 33.3% of parents stated that the disease had affected their child's daily activities.In families of children with atopic dermatitis, various family environment factors facilitate the recurrence of symptoms even when no cutaneous lesions have been found on the child. The identification and use of family resources to face this disease are aspects that should be taken into consideration during the psychotherapeutic management of these families, putting emphasis on the most affected functional categories of these families in a strategy that should be implanted in a multi-disciplinary context.
Problematic Internet use in Chinese adolescents and its relation to psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction
Hui Cao, Ying Sun, Yuhui Wan, Jiahu Hao, Fangbiao Tao
BMC Public Health , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-802
Abstract: A cross-sectional survey was conducted comprising a large representative sample of 17 599 students in eight cities of China. PIU was assessed by the 20-item Young Internet Addiction Test (YIAT). The Multidimensional Sub-health Questionnaire of Adolescents and the Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale were administered to obtain information on psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction. Demographics and Internet usage patterns were also collected. Logistic regression was used to assess the effects of PIU on psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction.Approximately 8.1% of subjects showed PIU. Adolescents with PIU were associated with males, high school students, urban, eastern and western areas, upper self-report family economy, service type mostly used for entertainment and relieving loneliness and more frequency of Internet use. Compared with normal Internet users, adolescents with PIU were more likely to suffer from psychosomatic symptoms (P < 0.001), including lack of physical energy (P < 0.001), physiological dysfunction (P < 0.001), weakened immunity (P < 0.001), emotional symptoms (P < 0.001), behavioural symptoms (P < 0.001) and social adaptation problems (P < 0.001). Adolescents with PIU had lower scores on total and all dimensions of life satisfaction (all P < 0.001). Adjusted for the demographic and Internet-related factors, there was positive significant relationship between PIU and psychosomatic symptoms, but negatively related to life satisfaction.PIU is common among Chinese students, and PIU was significantly associated with psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction. Effective measures are needed to prevent the spread of this problem and interventions to prevent the effects of PIU on psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction should be conducted as early as possible.The Internet has become an important tool for social interaction, information, and entertainment [1]. However, as the Internet has moved into homes, schools, Internet c
A possible connection between psychosomatic symptoms and daily rhythmicity in growth hormone secretion in healthy Japanese students
Mitsuo Nagane, Kazunori Yoshimura, Shu-Ichi Watanabe, Masahiko Nomura
Journal of Circadian Rhythms , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1740-3391-7-10
Abstract: We examined 15 healthy students (4 men and 11 women) between 21 and 22 years old. To assess the presence of psychosomatic symptoms among the subjects, we developed a self-assessment psychosomatic complaints questionnaire consisting of five items pertaining to physical symptoms and five items concerning mental symptoms. The subjects rated their psychosomatic symptoms twice a day (08:00 and 20:00 h). We also assessed growth hormone secretion patterns by fluorescence enzyme immunoassay (FEIA). Salivary samples were collected from the subjects at home five times a day (20:00, 24:00, 04:00, 08:00, and 12:00 h) in Salivette tubes.The results indicated a relationship between the self-assessment scores and the salivary levels of growth hormone. Subjects with high self-assessment scores showed significant variability in growth hormone secretion over the day, whereas subjects with low self-assessment scores did not.Psychosomatic symptoms may be associated with circadian dysfunction, as inferred from blunted rhythmicity in growth hormone secretion.Japanese students suffering from psychosomatic disorders, such as those involving mood and sleep, may exhibit basic problems in their lifestyle, including deleterious changes in their living environment and dietary or lifestyle disturbances [1]. In particular, staying up late is associated with decreased appetite and missed breakfast the following morning, irregular bowel movements and sleepiness. Perhaps the biggest problem facing today's Japanese students is their lack of daily physical exercise, brought on by stressful academic courses over long periods of time, too much television and computer games and increased automobile use [2]. Many Japanese youngsters stay up late at night [3].A circadian pacemaker in the central nervous system regulates human sleep cycles, hormone secretion, subject alertness, objective performance levels and other physiologic functions over a 24-h period. Core body temperature, plasma cortisol, and plasma
Self-esteem in Children with Psychosomatic Symptoms: Examination of Low Self-esteem and Prognosis
Hosogi,Mizuho,Okada,Ayumi,Yamanaka,Eriko,Ootyou,Keiko
Acta Medica Okayama , 2007,
Abstract: Self-esteem is the evaluative feelings one holds for oneself and the sense that one has essential worth. It is evaluated as the difference between the actual self and the ideal self. Healthy self-esteem supports psychological stability and positive social activity and is an essential element in the psychological development of children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate self-esteem in children with psychosomatic symptoms and elucidate a strategy for using such evaluations in therapy. We evaluated self-esteem in 56 patients at the Department of Pediatrics of Okayama University Hospital who were undergoing outpatient therapy for psychosomatic symptoms, using Pope's 5-scale test of self-esteem for children. We examined patient attributes, course of therapy, and social adjustment. Patients with low self-esteem on multiple scales at the first visit were all female, and these patients had a significantly higher frequency of family function problems, such as a family member with a psychiatric disorder, economic hardship, or experience of child abuse. Moreover, the prognosis for these patients was poor regardless of their social adjustment at the first visit.
Explanations for female excess psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence: evidence from a school-based cohort in the West of Scotland
Helen N Sweeting, Patrick B West, Geoff J Der
BMC Public Health , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-7-298
Abstract: A cohort of 2,196 school pupils (analyses restricted to 2,005 with complete data) surveyed at age 15. All measures were obtained via self-completion questionnaires, apart from body mass index, derived from measured height and weight. Analyses examined (a) sex differences in each potential explanatory factor; (b) their associations with the health measures; (c) the effect of adjustment for these factors on sex differences in the health measures; and (d) the existence of interactive effects between sex and the explanatory factors on the health measuresEach potential explanatory factor was significantly differentiated by sex. Self-esteem, body image (represented by weight-related worries), smoking and physical activity were related to the health measures. These factors accounted for one third of the female excess in headaches and stomach problems, half the excess in dizziness and almost all that in respect of depressive mood. Self-esteem and body image were the factors most consistently related to health, and adjustment for these resulted in the largest reductions in the odds of a female excess in both the psychosomatic symptoms and depressive mood.Adjustment for a range of potential psychosocial and behavioural factors largely explains (statistically) excess female depressive mood. These factors also partially explain the female excess in certain psychosomatic symptoms.The emergence of higher rates of psychological distress among females in early-mid adolescence is well documented [1-3], one study showing a consistent pattern in the onset of excess depression among females at age 14 across three Western countries, irrespective of how measured [4]. Other studies have found a similar pattern for chronic illness, self-reported health, physical and/or psychosomatic symptoms [5-8]. Thus, in previous analyses, based on the dataset employed in this paper, we showed that generally high levels of self-reported morbidity tended to increase between ages 11 and 15, these increase
Mental and somatic symptoms related to suicidal ideation in patients visiting a psychosomatic clinic in Japan
Kouichi Yoshimasu, Tetsuya Kondo, Shoji Tokunaga, et al
International Journal of General Medicine , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S6631
Abstract: tal and somatic symptoms related to suicidal ideation in patients visiting a psychosomatic clinic in Japan Original Research (3733) Total Article Views Authors: Kouichi Yoshimasu, Tetsuya Kondo, Shoji Tokunaga, et al Published Date August 2009 Volume 2009:2 Pages 163 - 170 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S6631 Kouichi Yoshimasu1, Tetsuya Kondo2,4, Shoji Tokunaga3, Yoshio Kanemitsu2, Hideyo Sugahara2, Mariko Akamine2, Kanichiro Fujisawa2, Kazuhisa Miyashita1, Chiharu Kubo2 1Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan; 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate school of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Medical Informatics, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan; 4Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Patients with suicidal ideation (SI) have various mental or somatic symptoms. A questionnaire-based interview elicited details concerning mental and somatic symptoms in patients visiting a psychosomatic clinic in Japan. Univariate logistic regression analyses followed by multiple regression models using a stepwise method were selected for identifying the candidate symptoms. Overall, symptoms related to depression were associated with SI in both sexes. Although women showed more various somatic symptoms associated with SI than men, many of those associations were diminished once severity of the depression was controlled. The current results suggest that a variety of self-reported symptoms, mainly related to depression, might reveal suicidal risk in outpatients with an urban hospital clinical setting.
Mental and somatic symptoms related to suicidal ideation in patients visiting a psychosomatic clinic in Japan  [cached]
Kouichi Yoshimasu,Tetsuya Kondo,Shoji Tokunaga,et al
International Journal of General Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Kouichi Yoshimasu1, Tetsuya Kondo2,4, Shoji Tokunaga3, Yoshio Kanemitsu2, Hideyo Sugahara2, Mariko Akamine2, Kanichiro Fujisawa2, Kazuhisa Miyashita1, Chiharu Kubo21Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan; 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate school of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Medical Informatics, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan; 4Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Patients with suicidal ideation (SI) have various mental or somatic symptoms. A questionnaire-based interview elicited details concerning mental and somatic symptoms in patients visiting a psychosomatic clinic in Japan. Univariate logistic regression analyses followed by multiple regression models using a stepwise method were selected for identifying the candidate symptoms. Overall, symptoms related to depression were associated with SI in both sexes. Although women showed more various somatic symptoms associated with SI than men, many of those associations were diminished once severity of the depression was controlled. The current results suggest that a variety of self-reported symptoms, mainly related to depression, might reveal suicidal risk in outpatients with an urban hospital clinical setting.Keywords: suicidal ideation, psychosomatic clinic, subjective symptoms
Perceived mental stress in women associated with psychosomatic symptoms, but not mortality: observations from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden  [cached]
Hange D,Mehlig K,Lissner L,Guo X
International Journal of General Medicine , 2013,
Abstract: Dominique Hange,1 Kirsten Mehlig,2 Lauren Lissner,2 Xinxin Guo,3 Calle Bengtsson,1, Ingmar Skoog,3 Cecilia Bj rkelund1 1Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, 2Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Public Health Epidemiology, 3Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Section of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Calle Bengtsson passed away on 23rd March 2013 Purpose: To investigate possible association between mental stress and psychosomatic symptoms, socioeconomic status, lifestyle, as well as incident mortality in a middle-aged female population followed over 37 years. Methods: A prospective observational study initiated in 1968–1969, including 1462 women aged 60, 54, 50, 46, and 38 years, with follow-ups in 1974–1975, 1980–1981, and 2000–2001, was performed. Measures included self-reported mental stress as well as psychosomatic symptoms and smoking, physical activity, total cholesterol, S-triglycerides, body mass index, waist–hip ratio, blood pressure, socioeconomic status and mortality. Results: Smoking, not being single, and not working outside home were strongly associated with reported mental stress at baseline. Women who reported high mental stress in 1968–1969 were more likely to report presence of abdominal symptoms (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39–2.46), headache/migraine (OR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.53–2.72), frequent infections (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.14–2.70), and musculoskeletal symptoms (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.30–2.23) than women who did not report mental stress. Women without these symptoms at baseline 1968–1969, but with perceived mental stress were more likely to subsequently report incident abdominal symptoms (OR = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.39–3.34), headache/migraine (OR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.48–3.48) and frequent infections (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.12–4.36) in 1974–1975 than women without mental stress in 1968–1969. There was no association between perceived mental stress at baseline and mortality over 37 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Women reporting mental stress had a higher frequency of psychosomatic symptoms than women who did not report these symptoms. Not working outside home and smoking rather than low socioeconomic status per se was associated with higher stress levels. Perception of high mental stress was not associated with increased mortality. Keywords: cardiovascular disease, mental stress, mortality, psychosomatic symptoms, population study, women
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