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Sulla sismicità della zona di Scalea (Cosenza)
M. DE PANFILIS
Annals of Geophysics , 1968, DOI: 10.4401/ag-5060
Abstract: Conducted on request of the " General Direction for Special Services " of the Ital. Ministry of Public Works, the study expounds the geoseismic elements that permit to estimate the degree of seismicity of the Scalea region, in province of Cosenza. After examining the morphologic aspects and geologic constitution of the region, the A. reviews the Calabrian and Lucanian seismic events, in which it has been more or less involved in the past. Finally, suggestions are made concerning the provisions appearing necessary, in case the above mentioned Ministry should intend to approve the request presented by the commune of Scalea in order to obtain, for its territory, the cancellation off the list of second-class seismic localities, as annexed to law n. 1684 of 25'" November 1962.
Role of Electroencephalography in Presurgical Evaluation of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy  [PDF]
Seetharam Raghavendra,Javeria Nooraine,Seyed M. Mirsattari
Epilepsy Research and Treatment , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/204693
Abstract: Surgery remains a therapeutic option for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Comprehensive presurgical evaluation includes electroencephalography (EEG) and video EEG in identifying patients who are likely to benefit from surgery. Here, we discuss in detail the utility of EEG in presurgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy along with illustrative cases. 1. Introduction Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of epilepsy worldwide. Anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for medically refractory TLE secondary to mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in many of the comprehensive epilepsy management centres. Surgery is ideally directed towards complete seizure freedom without or with very minimal cognitive or functional deficits. Wiebe et al. in 2001 published the only randomised control study demonstrating the effectiveness of surgery in adults with medically refractory TLE [1]. Here, we would like to emphasise that the art of presurgical workup is to effectively use all the clinical, imaging, and electrophysiological information to localize the seizure onset zone (SOZ) and the epileptic network. In this paper, the electroencephalography (EEG) aspects of TLE with relevance to surgery are discussed with illustrative cases (see Table 1). Table 1: Clinical details of the illustrative cases. 2. Surface EEG Electrophysiological assessment remains the cornerstone for patients with TLE [10]. Standard EEG with 10–20 system provides limited coverage of the temporal regions detecting only about 58% of temporal spikes or interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Additional electrodes help in increasing this yield [11, 12]. Silverman’s electrodes (T1 and T2, placed at posterior one-third and anterior two-thirds of a line connecting the outer canthus of the eye and the tragus) are often used to record from the anterior-basal areas of the temporal lobes [13–16]. Mandibular notch, nasopharyngeal (NP), sphenoidal (SP), and foramen ovale (FO) electrodes also help similarly. NP recordings are cumbersome and provide little information over the well-tolerated routine anterior temporal and ear recordings especially with regard to anterior temporal IEDs [17, 18]. However, NP recordings have increased sensitivity for IEDs arising from mesiobasal temporal regions (increasing IEDs identification by 25%) [19]. FO electrodes offer a unique opportunity for simultaneous intracranial and surface EEG recording without breach of the skull. They may lateralize seizures in adults and children with mesial TLE
Electroencephalography in eating disorders
Jáuregui-Lobera I
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2011,
Abstract: Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera1,21Behavioral Sciences Institute, 2Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, SpainAbstract: Clinical applications of electroencephalography (EEG) are used with different objectives, EEG being a noninvasive and painless procedure. In respect of eating disorders, in the 1950s a new line of study about the neurological bases of anorexia nervosa was started and has since been developed. The purpose of this review is to update the existing literature data on the main findings in respect of EEG in eating disorders by means of a search conducted in PubMed. Despite the fact that weight gain tends to normalize some brain dysfunctions assessed by means of EEG, the specific effect of gaining weight remains controversial. Different studies have reported that cortical dysfunctions can be found in patients with anorexia nervosa even after weight gain, whereas others have reported a normalization of EEG in respect of the initial reduced alpha/increased beta power in those patients with refeeding. Findings of studies that have analyzed the possible relationship between eating disorders and depression, based on sleep EEG disturbances, do not support the idea of eating disorders as a variant of depression or affective disorders. Some EEG findings are very consistent with previous neuroimaging results on patients with anorexia nervosa, reporting neural disturbances in response to stimuli that are relevant to the pathology (eg, stimuli like food exposure, different emotional situations, or body images).Keywords: electroencephalography, event-related potentials, sleep, depression, refeeding, weight gain
On the methodological unification in electroencephalography
Piotr J Durka
BioMedical Engineering OnLine , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1475-925x-4-15
Abstract: Adaptive time-frequency approximations of EEG are discussed in the light of the available experimental and theoretical evidence, and applicability in various experimental and clinical setups.Four lemmas and three conjectures support the following conclusion.Adaptive time-frequency approximations of signals unify most of the univariate computational approaches to EEG analysis, and offer compatibility with its traditional (visual) analysis, used in clinical applications."Animal electricity" has been subject to scientific research since the end of the 18th century, when Galvani and Volta performed their famous experiments [1]. Electrical activity of the brain was first mentioned in 1875, in a grant report by R. Caton [2]. In 1929 the first electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from the surface of human scalp by Hans Berger [3].Year 1935 witnessed birth of the major fields of today's clinical electroencephalography. F. Gibbs and H. Davis [4] showed association of 3/sec spike-wave complexes in EEG with epileptic petit mal absences, and A. L. Loomis et al [5] methodically studied human sleep EEG patterns and the stages of sleep. Also in 1935, the first electroencephalograph (Grass Model I) started the era of contemporary EEG recording: galvanometers, used in earlier decades to record EEG traces on photographic paper, were replaced by 3-channels preamplifier, and the recording was drawn by ink writer on rolls of paper. These rolls were later replaced by folded paper, and, currently, by digital storage and display of EEG traces. Also, contemporary amplifiers provide higher sensitivity and number of channels, but all these changes are quantitative rather than qualitative.Finally, by the end of forties, Dawson [6] recorded first evoked potentials. He constructed an advanced mechano-electrical (analog) device for averaging brains potentials triggered by a stimulus [7]. Averaging was indispensable to show the event-related activity, which is normally invisible in the on-going
Electroencephalography in eating disorders
Jáuregui-Lobera I
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S27302
Abstract: troencephalography in eating disorders Review (3937) Total Article Views Authors: Jáuregui-Lobera I Published Date December 2011 Volume 2012:8 Pages 1 - 11 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S27302 Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera1,2 1Behavioral Sciences Institute, 2Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Clinical applications of electroencephalography (EEG) are used with different objectives, EEG being a noninvasive and painless procedure. In respect of eating disorders, in the 1950s a new line of study about the neurological bases of anorexia nervosa was started and has since been developed. The purpose of this review is to update the existing literature data on the main findings in respect of EEG in eating disorders by means of a search conducted in PubMed. Despite the fact that weight gain tends to normalize some brain dysfunctions assessed by means of EEG, the specific effect of gaining weight remains controversial. Different studies have reported that cortical dysfunctions can be found in patients with anorexia nervosa even after weight gain, whereas others have reported a normalization of EEG in respect of the initial reduced alpha/increased beta power in those patients with refeeding. Findings of studies that have analyzed the possible relationship between eating disorders and depression, based on sleep EEG disturbances, do not support the idea of eating disorders as a variant of depression or affective disorders. Some EEG findings are very consistent with previous neuroimaging results on patients with anorexia nervosa, reporting neural disturbances in response to stimuli that are relevant to the pathology (eg, stimuli like food exposure, different emotional situations, or body images).
Challenges of Upgrading a Virtual Appliance  [PDF]
Kamran Karimi
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: A virtual appliance contains a target application, and the running environment necessary for running that application. Users run an appliance using a virtualization engine, freeing them from the need to make sure that the target application has access to all its dependencies. However, creating and managing a virtual appliance, versus a stand-alone application, requires special considerations. Upgrading a software system is a common requirement, and is more complicated when dealing with an appliance. This is because both the target application and the running environment must be upgraded, and there are often dependencies between these two components. In this paper we briefly discuss some important points to consider when upgrading an appliance. We then present a list of items that can help developers prevent problems during an upgrade effort.
Appliance Controlling Using IPAC  [cached]
Sandeep Kumar,Saiful Islam,Archana Gupta,Himanshu Bhardwaj
Journal of Emerging Technologies in Web Intelligence , 2010, DOI: 10.4304/jetwi.2.3.232-238
Abstract: Today, because of the advancements in the computer and electronic sciences everything is going to be automated. In fact, some devices or infrastructures are capable to change the behavior according to situations; these devices are called Smart Devices or Smart Infrastructures. This system is designed to meet the requirement of appliance control in automated or smart infrastructures which includes home, offices, industries or may be sophisticated vehicles like aero planes. Appliance control basically refers the process or technique of controlling a device (including complete machines, mechanical devices, electronic devices, electrical devices etc.) using some comfortable, luxurious and reliable means based on some automation methods. Even a number of standards have been defined for wired and wireless controlling and automation of home appliances including Bluetooth, UPnP, X10 etc, this field is still in developing state. In this document we have proposed an appliance controlling system, named as Internet and PC Based Appliance Control (IPAC), using concepts of parallel port programming. IPAC is designed to control a device from PC and from Internet, and can be applied in any smart infrastructure to automate the device and can work with almost every type of automation method either it is wired (e.g. LAN) or wireless (e.g. Bluetooth). This system can be applied in designing smart homes, secure homes, centralized device controlling system, Bluetooth control system, WAP control system.
Molecular Characterization of Cosenza Mutation among Patients with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran
Seyed Reza Kazemi Nezhad,Fatemeh Fahmi,Saeid Reza Khatami,Mohsen Musaviun
Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences , 2011,
Abstract: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common hereditary enzymatic disorders in human, increases the vulnerability of erythrocytes to oxidative stress. It is also characterized by remarkable molecular and biochemical heterogeneity. According to previous investigations, G6PD Cosenza (G1376C) is a common G6PD mutation in some parts of Iran. Therefore in the present study we have characterized Cosenza mutation among G6PD deficient individuals in Khuzestan province. In order to identify G6PD Cosenza, we analyzed the G6PD gene in 64 samples out of 231 deficient individuals who had not G6PD Mediterranean mutation, using PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. G6PD Cosenza mutation was found in 6 males of 231 samples, resulting in the relative rate of 2.6% and allele frequency of 0.023 among Khuzestanian G6PD deficient subjects. A comparison of these results with previous findings in some parts of Iran suggests that G6PD Cosenza is a common mutation in Khuzestanian G6PD deficient individuals
Agitation in the medically ill elderly
AO Aloa, M Soderberg, M Koss
West African Journal of Medicine , 2005,
Abstract: Agitation is a common and significant problem in the medically ill elderly. It is responsible for diminished quality of life for not only the patient, but the caregivers as well as the patient\'s relatives. This paper will illustrate the concept of agitation and different modes of classification. The major emphasis will be placed on discussing prompt, correct diagnosis of the underlying cause of agitation and effective treatment of both the cause of agitation and the symptoms of agitation itself.
Habit Breaking Appliance for Multiple Corrections  [PDF]
Reji Abraham,Geetha Kamath,Jasmeet Singh Sodhi,Sonia Sodhi,Chandki Rita,S. Sai Kalyan
Case Reports in Dentistry , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/647649
Abstract: Tongue thrusting and thumb sucking are the most commonly seen oral habits which act as the major etiological factors in the development of dental malocclusion. This case report describes a fixed habit correcting appliance, Hybrid Habit Correcting Appliance (HHCA), designed to eliminate these habits. This hybrid appliance is effective in less compliant patients and if desired can be used along with the fixed orthodontic appliance. Its components can act as mechanical restrainers and muscle retraining devices. It is also effective in cases with mild posterior crossbites. 1. Introduction Parafunctional habits are recognized as a major etiological factor for the development of dental malocclusion. Thumb sucking and tongue thrusting are the most commonly seen oral habits [1–3]. The line of treatment for these habits includes removal of the etiology, retraining exercises and use of mechanical restraining appliances [4, 5]. Tongue bead appliances are commonly used as retraining exercise devices [6–9]. In severe tongue thrusting cases and in cases with anterior open bite, a bead appliance alone may not be effective in restricting the habit. Tongue crib appliances are extremely effective in breaking the tongue thrust habit [4, 5, 10, 11]. They create a mechanical barrier and prevent the tongue from thrusting between the incisors. In most of the cases with severe thumb/digit sucking habit, an anterior open bite develops [12, 13]. This will result in the development of a secondary tongue thrust habit. Hence, in cases with severe prolonged thumb or digit sucking, an appliance which can eliminate both of these habits is appropriate [14]. Patient compliance is another problem associated with removable habit breaking appliances [15, 16]. Hence, habit breaking appliances which can be used along with fixed orthodontic appliances will be of great advantage. This paper describes a habit breaking appliance Hybrid Habit Correcting Appliance (HHCA) which can be used to effectively restrain and correct tongue thrusting as well as thumb sucking habit. 2. Appliance Design Hybrid Habit Correcting Appliance (HHCA) (Figure 1) incorporates a tongue bead, a palatal crib and a U-loop which is attached to the molar bands on either sides. Figure 1: Hybrid Habit Correcting Appliance (HHCA). The tongue bead (Figure 1(a)) consists of a spinnable acrylic bead of 3?mm diameter. The appliance is designed to position the acrylic bead over the posterior one-third of the incisive papilla. The bead acts as a tongue retrainer. The patient is asked to constantly pull the bead towards the posterior
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