oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
INSTITUTIONAL COMPETITION: A NEW THEORETICAL CONCEPT FOR ECONOMIC HISTORY  [cached]
Oliver Volckart
Essays in Economic & Business History , 1999,
Abstract: The paper presents institutional competition between political authorities as a moving force behind institutional and economic change. It introduces the theoretical concept, stressing the interplay between political and economic actors and the transaction costs that the exit and voice options involve. Subsequentiy the concept is applied to German premodern economic history. The paper shows how it may help to explain the transformation from an economic order based on a corporate society to a modern market economy. In a final chapter, some possible further areas of research that might prove to be fruitful are outlined.
Foreign Aid and Economic Growth in Developing Countries: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa  [PDF]
Kin-Boon Tang, Diya Bundhoo
Theoretical Economics Letters (TEL) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/tel.2017.75099
Abstract: This study aims at understanding the impact of foreign aid on the economic growth of the Sub Saharan African region. Despite being the largest foreign aid recipient in the world, the region is the poorest with the lowest Human Development Index (HDI) and Gross National Income (GNI) per capita. This raises serious questions about the effectiveness of foreign aid to the economic growth and development of the region. As such, we examine the relationship between foreign aid, determined by the official development assistance (ODA), and the economic growth rate of the Sub Saharan Africa’s ten largest recipients of foreign aid, for a 23-year period from 1990 to 2012. These ten countries include Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Kenya, Cote d’Ivoire, Mozambique, Nigeria, Ghana, Uganda and Malawi. We find that aid by itself does not have significant impact on economic growth. However, the variable aid interacted with the policy index was found to be statistically significant and positive, which means that aid tends to increase growth rate in a good policy environment. Subsequently, when we include the institutional quality index and its interaction term in the model, we find that institutional quality has a positive and significant impact on growth; however, none of the aid variables was significant. We also test the two-gap growth model which states that foreign aid enhances economic growth through investment and imports. The results show that foreign aid is a good ingredient for supplementing investment and imports requirements in these ten countries. We believe that given foreign aid is conditional on the economic, political and institutional environment of the recipient country, this can explain why aid effectiveness is insignificant in the Sub Saharan Africa region where bad governance is a core issue on the region. Therefore, respective governments, donor agencies, and policy makers should take into consideration these multiple aspects when undertaking aid-financing activities.
A Model for Making Foreign Direct Investment Decisions Using Real Variables for Political and Economic Risk Analysis  [PDF]
Carl B.McGowan, Jr.,Susan E. Moeller
Managing Global Transitions , 2009,
Abstract: The Foreign Investment Risk Matrix (FIRM) developed by Bhalla (1983) uses political and economic risk measures for foreign direct investment decision making. FIRM may be used to develop a matrix that categorizes countries based on political risk and economic risk as acceptable, unacceptable, or uncertain for investment.We demonstrate using political and economic risk variables that are available on the internet in an expanded model using three measures of political risk and three measures of economic risk. After determining the group of countries that would be acceptable for FDI, the multinational companies can focus on further analysis of acceptable countries.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AS A MATTER OF POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY
Streb,Jorge M; Druck,Pablo F;
Estudios de economía , 2007, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-52862007000100001
Abstract: can limited government be a driving force of economic development? this idea goes back to montesquieu, and is closely related to recent research in institutional economics. measuring limited government with the heniszpolitical constraints index, and economic development with income per capita, the paper first does a causality test to see whether political constraints lead income per capita. since both are persistent variables, their differences are analyzed. the evidence from the 1960-1990 period indeed suggests that increases in political constraints precede economic growth. the effect of political constraints might take a long time period to set in, so a second test looks at the link between income per capita and polity persistence, conditioned on the degree of political constraints. polity persistence is positively linked to income per capita with high political constraints, but there is no link with low political constraints. this broader evidence suggests that limited government has been conducive to economic development over the long run
KURUMSAL YAPININ EKONOM K BüYüMEYE ETK S : üST ORTA GEL R DüZEY NDEK üLKELER üZER NE B R UYGULAMA = THE EFFECT OF INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE ON ECONOMIC GROWTH: AN APPLICATION FOR UPPER-MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES
Sevda YAPRAKLI
Ege Academic Review , 2008,
Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of institutional structure on economic growth. In this study, for this purpose, the effect of institutional structure on economic growth is analyzed econometrically by employing a “Panel Data Analysis” in the sample including Turkey in thirty-six upper middle income countries for the period between the years 2002 and 2005. Analysis results indicate variables which of the indicators institutional structure voice and accountability, political stability, regulatory quality and rule of law have a negative effect on economic growth, and goverment effectiveness and control of corruption have positive effect on economic growth.
Political Regimes and Economic Growth
Carlos Pinho,Mara Madaleno
Revista Enfoques : Ciencia Política y Administración Pública , 2009,
Abstract: Are political regimes drivers of economic growth? While political institutions are influenced by economic development, they are in turn a key determinant of the development process. This study builds in the Neoclassical Growth theory to identify the influence of political regimes on economic development through a panel data sample of 170 countries from 1960 to 2000. Results suggest that once fixed effects are considered, the positive relationship between income per capita and political regimes measured by different democracy variables disappears.
Institutions, Investment and Economic Growth
Hadhek Zouhaier,KEFI Mohamed Karim
International Journal of Economics and Finance , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/ijef.v4n2p152
Abstract: The objective of this paper is to study the effect of institutional factors on investment and economic growth of a set of 11 countries in the MENA region during the period 2000-2009, using a model of dynamic panel data. The effect of institutions on the contribution of investment to economic growth has been a second empirical study in this paper. The key findings generated by these two empirical tests stipulate a significant relationship between institutional variables and investment on the one hand and economic growth on the other hand, a positive interaction between political institutions and investment and a negative interaction between political instability and investment.
Socio-economic factors explain differences in public health-related variables among women in Bangladesh: A cross-sectional study
Md Mobarak H Khan, Alexander Kraemer
BMC Public Health , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-254
Abstract: Secondary data was used in this study. 120 women living in slums (as cases) and 480 age-matched women living in other areas (as controls) were extracted from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2004. Many socio-economic and demographic variables were analysed. SPSS was used to perform simple as well as multiple analyses. P-values based on t-test and Wald test were also reported to show the significance level.Unadjusted results indicated that a significantly higher percent of women living in slums came from country side, had a poorer status by household characteristics, had less access to mass media, and had less education than women not living in slums. Mean BMI, knowledge of AIDS indicated by ever heard about AIDS, knowledge of avoiding AIDS by condom use, receiving adequate antenatal visits (4 or more) during the last pregnancy, and safe delivery practices assisted by skilled sources were significantly lower among women living in slums than those women living in other areas. However, all the unadjusted significant associations with the variable slum were greatly attenuated and became insignificant (expect safe delivery practices) when some socio-economic variables namely childhood place of residence, a composite variable of household characteristics, a composite variable of mass media access, and education were inserted into the multiple regression models. Taken together, childhood place of residence, the composite variable of mass media access, and education were the strongest predictors for the health related outcomes.Reporting unadjusted findings of public health variables in women from slums versus non-slums can be misleading due to confounding factors. Our findings suggest that an association of childhood place of residence, mass media access and public health education should be considered before making any inference based on slum versus non-slum comparisons.People living in slums and informal settlements are growing rapidly all over the world espec
Europeanization and the Mechanics of Economic Policy Adjustment  [PDF]
Vivien A. Schmidt
European Integration Online Papers , 2001,
Abstract: To explain divergence in member-state policy adjustment in response to the economic pressures of globalization and Europeanization (distinguished from European integration as the impact of EU level decisions on national level policies and institutions), this paper identifies five mediating factors: economic vulnerability, political institutional capacity, policy legacies, policy preferences, and discourse. In addition to these factors, it outlines four institutional adjustment pressures, including when an EU model is required, recommended, suggested, or not, to help explain the differential outcomes to Europeanization, whether policy inertia, absorption, or transformation. To illustrate, it focuses on the policy responses of three countries, France, Britain, and Germany, in such sectors as monetary policy, financial services, telecommunications, electricity, transport, the environment, and employment.
Europeanization and the Mechanics of Economic Policy Adjustment  [cached]
Vivien A. Schmidt
European Integration Online Papers , 2001,
Abstract: To explain divergence in member-state policy adjustment in response to the economic pressures of globalization and Europeanization (distinguished from European integration as the impact of EU level decisions on national level policies and institutions), this paper identifies five mediating factors: economic vulnerability, political institutional capacity, policy legacies, policy preferences, and discourse. In addition to these factors, it outlines four institutional adjustment pressures, including when an EU model is required, recommended, suggested, or not, to help explain the differential outcomes to Europeanization, whether policy inertia, absorption, or transformation. To illustrate, it focuses on the policy responses of three countries, France, Britain, and Germany, in such sectors as monetary policy, financial services, telecommunications, electricity, transport, the environment, and employment.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.