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The links between collaboration, agency, professional community and learning for teachers in a contemporary secondary school in England  [cached]
Mike Hudson
Educate~ , 2006,
Abstract: Contextualisation In this paper I have used questionnaire data to look at some of my colleagues’ conceptions of collaboration, teaching and learning. I have also investigated the connections between the various conceptions of this particular group of teachers. I felt that an investigation into the conceptions of colleagues would be fruitful, based on an assumption that the conceptions of learning held by teachers influence their approach to teaching and learning. In my research I found that colleagues were readily able to tell me about their experiences of working with other teachers but that they found difficulty in describing ‘learning’ itself. I therefore needed to devise a methodology that enabled me to illuminate the thinking behind the actions of my colleagues. The data show powerful links between the ways teachers think about their collaboration, teaching and learning. My argument is that conceptions underpin actions, strongly influencing the ways in which teachers work and learn with each other. Collaboration would seem to have the potential to promote agency, professional community (though both appear to be fragile), and learning. Abstract: This paper reports the results of part of a larger case study by an insider researcher. It draws on qualitative and quantitative data to highlight the links between collaboration, agency, professional community and learning among English secondary school teacher colleagues. The focus is on the learning potential of teacher collaboration in a mutually affirming professional community. It is argued that collaboration promotes agency and the ability to influence the way in which a school operates. The ranges of forces that either promote, or constrain, the agency of teachers are identified. In addition, it is argued that collaboration promotes professional community, qualities of trust, mutual respect, and teacher learning, through dialogue. The processes of teacher collaboration are seen to be important in school improvement and the effective learning of students. Some implications for leadership in schools are also identified.
The Investigation and Analysis of Teachers’ Involvement in Students’ Autonomous Learning  [PDF]
Chen Guan, Feipeng Li
Open Journal of Modern Linguistics (OJML) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojml.2014.44044
Abstract: The cultivation of students’ autonomous learning ability is one of the important sections of English teaching reform at college in China. However, it doesn’t mean that teachers’ involvement is becoming less and less necessary; instead, teachers’ involvement is significant and indispensable to guarantee and promote learner autonomy. This paper firstly introduces the basic concept of students’ autonomous learning and teachers’ involvement briefly. Then, it analyzes the statistics of the questionnaire about teachers’ involvement in Baoding University. Finally, this paper illustrates the different roles that teachers should play in and after class with the reference of questionnaire data discussed above. Hopefully, this paper may have some enlightment for teachers’ involvement in students’ autonomous learning.
Teachers’ and Teacher Students’ Conceptions of Learning and Creativity  [PDF]
Iida Vedenp??, Kirsti Lonka
Creative Education (CE) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.520203
Abstract: The aim of this study was to explore what kinds of conceptions of creativity and learning Finnish teachers and teacher students expressed, and how these conceptions were related to the respondents’ epistemologies (conceptions of knowledge and learning). The participants (n = 89) answered an e-form, consisting of 3 open-ended questions (conceptions of learning, creativity and the connection between the two). In addition, there were 23 two-part Likert-type statements on epistemologies (Lonka et al., 2008) as well as 10 background questions. Mixed method approach was used to analyze the conceptions that the respondents’ expressed. Two qualitative categories of conceptions of learning came from previous research, Constructivity and active epistemology (Lonka, Joram, & Bryson, 1996). A new category also emerged: Collaborativity of learning. The answers about creativity were classified based on whether creativity was viewed as an inborn ability or something changeable, whether focus was on product or process, and whether creativity was seen as collaborative. The participants’ open-ended conceptions of learning reflected a view of learning as teacher-regulated assimilation, whereas their (structured) epistemologies higlighted reflection and deep-level learning. Creativity was viewed as something that can be improved, focusing on the collaborative process. A link between learning and creativity was identified. It shall be of interest to see, how such epistemic stands would be related to group work.
Algebra I Teachers’ Perceptions of Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities
Angela Lusk,Tony Thompson,C. J. Daane
Journal of Curriculum and Instruction , 2008,
Abstract: Although numerous studies have focused on teachers’ perceptions of inclusion, there is a scarcity of subject-specific research on their perceptions of a specific disability. In this study, 63 Algebra I teachers in 27 school districts in Alabama were surveyed to uncover their perceptions of teaching students with learning disabilities (LD) and factors that might affect these perceptions. The results indicated that Algebra I teachers do not have an overall favorable perception of teaching students with LD in inclusive classrooms. Collaboration with a special education teacher and the number of students with LD in the general education classroom were found to significantly contribute to Algebra I teachers’ perceptions of teaching students with LD.
Scaffolding and interventions between students and teachers in a Learning Design Sequence
St?lbrandt, Eva Edman;H?ssjer, Annika;
Psicologia Escolar e Educacional , 2007, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-85572007000300004
Abstract: the aims of this paper are to develop knowledge about scaffolding when students in swedish schools use digital educational material and to investigate what the main focus is in teachers' interventions during a learning design sequence (lds), based on a socio-cultural perspective. the results indicate that scaffolding were most common in the primary transformation unit and the most frequent type was procedural scaffolding, although all types of scaffolds; conceptual, metacognitive, procedural, strategic, affective and technical scaffolding occurred in all parts of a learning design sequence. in this study most of the teachers and students, think that using digital educational material requires more and other forms of scaffolding and concerning teacher interventions teachers interact both supportively and restrictively according to students' learning process. reasons for that are connected to the content of the intervention and whether teachers intervene together with the students or not.
Students’, Teachers’ and Faculty Members’ Opinions About Problem Based Learning  [PDF]
Berna CANTüRK GüNHAN,Ne?e BA?ER
Necatibey Faculty of Education, Electronic Journal of Science and Mathematics Education , 2009,
Abstract: In this research, it was figured out students’, teachers’, and faculty members’ views about the problem based learning method. After the problem based learning method was applied in the mathematics course of the seven grades of the private school during the 2005-2006 academic year, it was interviewed twenty students, seven mathematics teachers, and six faculty members in two faculty of a university applied this method. The data of the study were collected through a semi-structured interview technique, one of the qualitative research methods. It was used the type-recorder in the interviews done with the students, mathematics teachers, and faculty members about the problem based learning method. After the obtained data evaluated, it was shown that the students’, teachers’, and faculty members’ views were positive.
An Investigation of Perceptions of Vietnamese Teachers and Students toward Cooperative Learning (CL)  [cached]
Pham Thi Hong Thanh
International Education Studies , 2011, DOI: 10.5539/ies.v4n1p3
Abstract: The present study examined how cooperative learning (CL) is implemented in Vietnamese classrooms, how local teachers' and students' perceived this approach to learning, and what were the local barriers that hindered its implementation. Forty teachers and forty students from twenty Vietnamese colleges completed a questionnaire about CL and follow-up interviews were conducted with ten students and ten teachers on their perceptions of this practice. The results showed that CL has become a common and preferred method of instruction in Vietnam. However, the functions of CL were often not understood correctly because the teachers and students maintained that CL mainly helped the students remember information rather than develop a deep understanding of the text they were studying. Responses also revealed that CL was hindered by a number of local cultural and institutional barriers such as class size, curriculum coverage and workload division. Future research may need to identify strategies to correct mismatches between CL principles and local barriers so that this approach to learning becomes more adaptive to the local context.
Minority Students’ Perceptions of Schooling and Teachers Quality to Support Their Learning  [cached]
Awal Mohammed Alhassan,Kuyini Ahmed Bawa
World Journal of Education , 2012, DOI: 10.5430/wje.v2n2p95
Abstract: In this study we surveyed 98 migrant or minority students in the Oslo and Follo areas of Norway about their experiences of school. We also surveyed 50 teachers who were teaching in those schools about their background information and teaching practices and how that might impact on student learning. We then followed 32 of the 98 students 3 years later to find out what these students felt about the role of the school and teachers in supporting their learning and its contribution to their success or non-success in school. There were differences in the perceptions of those young people who finished high school and those who dropped out of school after the initial survey, who felt that schools were not very supportive.
Minority Students’ Perceptions of Schooling and Teachers Quality to Support Their Learning in Norway  [cached]
Awal Mohammed Alhassan,Kuyini Ahmed Bawa
World Journal of Education , 2012, DOI: 10.5430/wje.v2n2p95
Abstract: In this study we surveyed 98 migrant or minority students in the Oslo and Follo areas of Norway about their experiences of school. We also surveyed 50 teachers who were teaching in those schools about their background information and teaching practices and how that might impact on student learning. We then followed 32 of the 98 students 3 years later to find out what these students felt about the role of the school and teachers in supporting their learning and its contribution to their success or non-success in school. There were differences in the perceptions of those young people who finished high school and those who dropped out of school after the initial survey, who felt that schools were not very supportive.
The role of learning technologists in supporting e-research  [cached]
Susi Peacock,Ann Robertson,Sarah Williams,Maria Giatsi Clausen
Research in Learning Technology , 2009, DOI: 10.3402/rlt.v17i2.10869
Abstract: This article explores how the role of learning technologists, a professional group that has emerged during the last 15 to 20 years, may be diversifying to include supporting e-research. It contributes to the current debate about the emerging profession and the roles it should play in contemporary higher education. Previous studies have shown that, typically, the profession's role has focussed almost exclusively on curriculum development; traditionally, learning technologists work with students and tutors to enhance the learning environment with technology. This article presents two case studies of PhD research that used a standard e-learning tool, the virtual learning environment (VLE), to conduct focus groups online. The case studies demonstrate the expert role of the learning technologist in supporting researchers to make informed decisions about whether and how to use e-learning tools to conduct qualitative e-research. The learning technologist advised on the potential advantages and limitations of using the VLE for research and fostered collaborative, working relationships with the researchers, acquiring extensive background knowledge about their projects. This required the learning technologist to draw upon her own experience with research into e-learning and on her professional experience gained from supporting curriculum developments. It is suggested that many learning technologists could extend their roles, transferring their knowledge to include supporting e-research. A more inclusive model of the learning technologist's role in academia could help address the potential polarisation of the profession into researchers and practitioners.
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