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Review Article: Ancient Galilee and the realities of the Roman Empire
Markus Cromhout
HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies , 2012,
Abstract: This review article summarises and delivers comment on Religion, ethnicity and identity in Ancient Galilee: A region in transition, edited by Jürgen Zangenberg, Harold W. Attridge and Dale B. Martin and published by Mohr Siebeck in 2007. The majority of the articles in this volume testify of a ‘Jewish’ or rather Judean Galilee in the 1st century. It was a region that had cultural, economic, social, political and religious contact with surrounding areas and was thoroughly integrated into the realities of the Roman Empire. Whilst interregional contact and trade occurred freely, resistance and conflict occurred due to the proximity of ‘the Other’ that threatened the cultural and religio-political sensitivities of the Galileans. The Galileans also had strong attachments to aspects of their Judean identity, as evidenced by their enhanced musical culture, conservative epigraphic habit, participation in the revolt and the following of cultural practices also found in Judea. Based on this collection of articles, there are a few areas that need further investigation: how and when did the region fall under Hasmonean control and what was the exact nature of the local population at that time? At the time of Antipas, were Galilean peasants generally experiencing harsh economic conditions, or did his rule allow for economic participation to flourish? The exact context of Jesus’ ministry, therefore, is still a matter to be decided and invites further investigation.
Critical thinking abilities among prospective educators: ideals versus realities
BJJ Lombard, MM Grosser
South African Journal of Education , 2004,
Abstract: One of the key educational ideals of the African Renaissance is the elevation of learners to the highest level of human development. The challenge put forward to the education and training sector is to provide for the necessary capacity and conditions to ensure sustainable holistic development and growth amongst all levels of learners. Parallel to this the South African Qualifications Authority's critical cross-field outcomes should be considered. One of these outcomes states that learners should be able to think critically. Although this outcome articulates well with the cognitive domain of holistic development, it also gives rise to some concern. One area of concern deals with the cultivation of critical thinking skills among learners. Research indicates not only that these higher order thinking skills are unlikely to develop simply as a result of maturation, but also that they are notoriously difficult to teach and learn. Furthermore, if it is assumed that educators should play a pivotal role in accompanying learners to develop critical thinking skills, it is perhaps also reasonable to assume that educators themselves should possess the capacity to think critically or to apply critical thinking skills. The purpose in this article is to elucidate the critical thinking abilities of a group of prospective educators in the light of the ideals being put forward by the African Renaissance and the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA). South African Journal of Education Vol.24(3) 2004: 212-216
The Multifaceted Granulosa Cell Tumours—Myths and Realities: A Review  [PDF]
Rani Kanthan,Jenna-Lynn Senger,Selliah Kanthan
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology , 2012, DOI: 10.5402/2012/878635
Abstract: Background. Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs), representing ~2% of ovarian tumours, are poorly understood neoplasms with unpredictable and undetermined biological behaviour. Design. 5 unusual presentations of GCT and a retrospective 14-year (1997–2011) surgical pathology review based on patient sex, age, tumour type and concurrent pathology findings are presented to discuss the “myths and realities” of GCTs in the context of relevant evidence-based literature. Results. The 5 index cases included (1) a 5 month-old boy with a left testicular mass, (2) a 7-day-old neonate with a large complex cystic mass in the abdomen, (3) a 76-year-old woman with an umbilical mass, (4) a 64-year-old woman with a complex solid-cystic pelvic mass, and (5) a 45 year-old woman with an acute abdomen. Pathological analysis confirmed the final diagnosis as (1) juvenile GCT, (2) macrofollicular GCT, (3) recurrent GCT 32 years later, (4) collision tumour: colonic adenocarcinoma and GCT, and (5) ruptured GCT. Conclusion. GCT is best considered as an unusual indolent neoplasm of low malignant potential with late recurrences that can arise in the ovaries and testicles in both the young and the old. Multifaceted clinical presentations coupled with the unpredictable biological behaviour with late relapses are diagnostic pitfalls necessitating a high degree of suspicion for accurate clinical and pathological diagnosis. 1. Introduction Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) though accounting for approximately 70% of malignant sex-cord stromal tumors are rare, comprising only 2–5% of all ovarian neoplasms [1–3]. These tumours arise from granulosa cells that are hormonally active stromal elements in close association with ovarian oocytes, which are responsible for the production of estradiol [1]. The exact etiology of this malignancy remains unknown, with no identification of specific defined risk factors [3]. The typical clinical scenario of a GCT is an older postmenopausal woman with menstrual abnormalities who is found to have a singular pelvic mass that is curable by en-bloc resection. While such typical cases do exist, characteristics of GCTs in clinical practice do not always fit within the confines of these parameters. As such, seeing past this “myth” to recognize and identify uncommon “realities” is necessary for the accurate diagnosis and management of GCTs. The aim of this study is to discuss the “myths and realities” of GCTs through a series of indexed cases in the context of relevant evidence-based literature. 2. Materials and Methods Five patients presented to our hospital with “unusual”
Rural General Surgery: A Review of the Current Situation and Realities from a Rural Community Practice in Central Nebraska  [cached]
Robert LeRoy Anderson,Mark Allen Anderson
Online Journal of Rural Research & Policy , 2012, DOI: 10.4148/ojrrp.v7i2.1669
Abstract: Purpose: To examine the reasons fewer students and residents are entering general surgery, to educate residents about the realities of rural general surgery based on the experience of three general surgeons in central Nebraska, and to suggest a strategy for individual general surgeons and for residency programs to maintain the rural surgical workforce.Methods: A systematic literature review of surveys, review articles, and editorials through PUBMED was performed. Relevant studies were included in a review of the current literature on the rural general surgery workforce, general surgery residency, fellowship training, and rural surgery education.Findings: There is an insufficient supply of general surgeons in many parts of the country, particularly in rural settings. More general surgery residents are entering into subspecialty fellowship training and fewer are practicing general surgery than in the past. Residents may have inaccurate perceptions about rural general surgery practice. Those residency programs with dedicated rural and community surgery rotations have had more success in producing rural general surgeons.Conclusions: Although specialization in surgery has many positive effects, maintenance of a general surgical workforce in rural America is crucial to the health care of many citizens. Increasing the numbers of mentoring and training programs could provide medical students and general surgery residents with more educational opportunities that may lead to increased interest in rural surgery.
Cosmopolitanism: in search of cosmos  [cached]
Fred Dallmayr
Ethics & Global Politics , 2012, DOI: 10.3402/egp.v5i3.18618
Abstract: The essay seeks to disentangle the meaning or meanings of the catch word “cosmopolitanism”. To contribute to its clarification, the essay distinguishes between three main interpretations: empirical, normative, and practical or interactive. In the first reading, the term coincides basically with “globalization” where the latter refers to such economic and technical processes as the global extension of financial and communications networks. A different meaning is given to the term by normative thinkers like Kant, Rawls, and Habermas. In this reading, cosmopolitanism refers to a set of moral and/or legal norms or principles governing international politics, regardless of whether these principles are derived from “noumenal” consciousness, an “original position” or rational discourse. Noting the is/ought dilemma troubling normativism, the essay introduces the further meaning of practical interaction. Indebted to the teachings of pragmatism, hermeneutics, and virtue ethics, this reading mitigates the split between norm and conduct through practical engagement and education.
Immigration, Cosmopolitanism, and the Opening of Borders .  [cached]
Ciprian Ni?u
Sfera Politicii , 2011,
Abstract: The paper critically examines the forms the idea of cosmopolitan hospitality takes both in the contemporary debate on the political rights of immigrants, and on the problem of global justice. Showing that the original Kantian meaning of hospitality presents some important limits in terms of the problems which contemporary political theory confronts with, the paper will also discuss some of the practical or normative difficulties faced by the contemporary cosmopolitanism, and how to address these difficulties.
FEMINISM AND COSMOPOLITANISM: SOME INEVITABLE CONNECTIONS
Diana Elena NEAGA
Lex et Scientia , 2011,
Abstract: In this paper I will approach the issue of feminism and cosmopolitanism in order to give arguments in sustaining the fact that, today, feminism and cosmopolitanism are inevitable connected. In constructing my discourse I will begin by laying out the main ideas of cosmopolitanism, followed by a presentation of the construction of the feminist movement over time, inter-relating these two discourses at the end of the analysis. Connected with political ethics, political theory and political philosophy, the theoretical framework selected for this paper is based on the cosmopolitan theory developed by scholars like Martha Nussbaum, Fiona Robinson and Kwame Anthony Appaih who, underlining universality, define cosmopolitism as a universal concern with every human life and its well-being, but who are also giving value to the differences (seen as cultural or/ and of identity) insofar as they are not harmful to people.
FEMINISM AND COSMOPOLITANISM: SOME INEVITABLE CONNECTIONS
DIANA ELENA NEAGA
Challenges of the Knowledge Society , 2011,
Abstract: In this paper I will approach the issue of feminism and cosmopolitanism in order to give arguments in sustaining the fact that, today, feminism and cosmopolitanism are inevitable connected. In constructing my discourse I will begin by laying out the main ideas of cosmopolitanism, followed by a presentation of the construction of the feminist movement over time, inter-relating these two discourses at the end of the analysis. Connected with political ethics, political theory and political philosophy, the theoretical framework selected for this paper is based on the cosmopolitan theory developed by scholars like Martha Nussbaum, Fiona Robinson and Kwame Anthony Appaih who, underlining universality, define cosmopolitism as a universal concern with every human life and its well-being, but who are also giving value to the differences (seen as cultural or/ and of identity) insofar as they are not harmful to people.
Altered Realities  [cached]
Linda Tilling
Opticon1826 , 2007, DOI: 10.5334/opt.020711
Abstract: 'Altered Realities' is an ongoing private photographic project exploring how perception can be altered without changing a fundamentally familiar structure. The pictures present the banal and the comfortably familiar in an unfamiliar way, objects and vistas that are part of the background and blend into the environment.
Crippin’ the Flaneur: Cosmopolitanism, and Landscapes of Tolerance
Fiona Kumari Campbell
Journal of Social Inclusion , 2010,
Abstract: Cosmopolitanism, desire and the contracting of social relationships are enduring themes in both philosophy and social theory. In this paper I seek to explore these themes in order to ascertain what they might mean to disabled people and the ethos of ableism more generally. Modern Westernized life has since the Industrial Revolution been sited in cities fostering the growth of urban culture and an ethos of cosmopolitanism (Agamben, 2009; Beck, 2002; Cheah, 2006). The cosmopolitan outlook has become the signifier of that which is developed, advanced and civilized in society. The liberal project of the melting pot, of social tolerance is cast against the backdrop of city life (Brown, 2006). The paper will first examine the trope of cosmopolitanism and disability including the place of ‘spaces’ for marginal peoples. Second, it will provide a perspective on the disabled flaneur (Campbell, 2009; Simmel, 1908; Young, 2005) who ambivalently claims ‘outsider-insidedness’ and finally the paper moves to consider the significant question of social inclusion and the government of aversion through the deployment of discourses of tolerance.
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