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Intestinal parasitic infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive individuals in Southeastern Venezuela
Caraballo,Alejandro; Orozco,Indhira; Mu?oz,Liliana;
Boletín chileno de parasitología , 2001, DOI: 10.4067/S0365-94022001000200010
Abstract: un estudio fue realizado en relación a establecer la presencia de parásitos intestinales en 35 pacientes infectados con el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (vih), desde julio 1997 a octubre 1998, admitidos en el hospital universitario "ruiz y páez" de ciudad bolívar, venezuela. parásitos fueron detectados en heces usando diversos métodos para la investigación de protozoos y hemintos, concentración éter-formalina, tinción de kinyoung y tricromico. edad, sexo, estado clínico de la infección de vih fueron registrados para cada participante del estudio. todos los pacientes presentaron diarrea crónica. en 20 pacientes infectados con vih (57%), uno o más parásitos intestinales fueron encontrados. los protozoos más frecuentemente encontrados fueron: blastocystis hominis (28,6%), cryptosporidium sp. (22,8%) e isospora belli (2,9%). microsporidia no fueron detectados. estos datos enfatizan la importancia de los portozoos oportunistas en pacientes infectados con vih.
OBSERVATION ON THE INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECTIONS
M.Rezaeian
Iranian Journal of Public Health , 1986,
Abstract: During 1980-82, a total number of 4143 stool samples, from 2332 males and 1811 females, referred to the Central Laboratory of the School of Public Health, were examined for intestinal parasites. All the specimens were examined for intestinal parasites. All the specimens were examined by formol-ether concentration and wet-mount (ringer solution) techniques. The main prevalent pathogenic parasites were Entamoeba histolytica (8.7%), Giardia lamblia (16.1%), and Hymenolepis nana (3.2%). The overall infection rate with protozoa, metazoan and both were 45%, 18.3% and 53.8% respectively.
The Change of Ghrelin Levels in Intestinal Parasitic Infections
Ahmet Erensoy, Suleyman Aydin, Neslihan Kelestimur, Sevda Kirbag, Salih Kuk
Journal of Medical Biochemistry , 2010, DOI: 10.2478/v10011-010-0004-0
Abstract: The aim of this work was to examine the relationship between active (acylated ghrelin) and inactive (desacylated ghrelin) ghrelin in the serum and other serum parameters in intestinal parasitic infections and healthy controls. Conventional microscopic methods (saline and iodine solutions, trichrome stain) were used to identify intestinal parasites in stool samples of 29 subjects attending Firat University Hospital. Serum parameters were assessed in a single measurement of serum from 29 parasite subjects, and in 18 healthy controls. Serum acylated ghrelin and desacylated ghrelin levels were measured using a commercial radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit. Paraoxonase and arylesterase were measured by using a spectrophotometer at 405 nm and 270 nm, respectively. Serum concentrations of acylated ghrelin and desacylated ghrelin were more markedly decreased in helminth bearing patients than the control group. Glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were higher in intestinal parasitic infections than in controls. Furthermore, there were no correlations between ghrelin levels and BMI. These results indicate that low ghrelin and PON1/AE level may be important for appetite monitoring in intestinal parasitic infections.
Intestinal parasitic infections in renal transplant recipients
Azami, Mehdi;Sharifi, Mehran;Hejazi, Sayed Hossein;Tazhibi, Mehdi;
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-86702010000100004
Abstract: the impact of intestinal parasitic infection in renal transplant recipients requires careful consideration in the developing world. however, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in iran. this study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in renal transplant recipients in iran. stool specimens from renal transplant recipients and control groups were obtained between june 2006 and january 2007. the samples screened for intestinal parasitic infections using direct smear, formalin-ether sedimentation, sheather's flotation and modified ziehl-neelsen staining methods. out of 150 renal transplant recipients, 33.3% (50), and out of 225 control group, 20% (45) were infected with one or more type of intestinal parasites. the parasites detected among patients included entamoeba coli (10.6%), endolimax nana (8.7%), giardia lamblia (7.4%), blastocystis spp. (4.7%), iodamoeba butschlii (0.7%), chilomastix mesnili (0.7%) and ascaris lumbricoides (0.7%). multiple infections were more common among renal transplant recipients group (p < 0.05). this study highlights the importance of testing for intestinal parasites among iranian renal transplant recipients. routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the renal transplant recipients by contributing to reduce severe infections.
Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Renal Transplant Recipients
M Nateghi Rostami,H Keshavarz,E Eskandari,EB Kia
Iranian Journal of Parasitology , 2007,
Abstract: Background: Organ transplant recipients can experience serious diseases from infections due to emerging and reemerging parasitic infections. This study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence of intestinal parasites among renal transplant re-cipients of Iran. "nMethods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2003 to August 2004 on renal transplant recipients in Iran. A total of 706 fecal samples obtained from randomly selected population originated from all over Iran. Patient's information was recorded in a questionnaire before sampling. A sample of stool was taken from each person. Direct wet smear exami-nation, formalin-ether concentration, Ziehl-neelsen staining, and agar plate culture were done for each sample. "nResults: Totally 32 patients (4.5%) were positive for parasitic infections. In searching for emerging parasitic infections, the most prevalent parasites were found to be Blastocystis hominis, Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba coli, respectively. The merely ova which were seen were related to Hymenolepis nana. With investigation of healthy control, no significant differ-ence was found between transplanted and normal population. "nConclusion: The population showed controlled rate of intestinal infections probably due to regular awareness concerning risks of opportunistic infections; albeit regular surveillance through routine examination of stool samples for parasites seems considerably advantages the transplant recipient patients.
Intestinal parasitic infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive individuals in Southeastern Venezuela Infecciones parasitarias intestinales en individuos positivos con el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH) en el Sureste de Venezuela  [cached]
Alejandro Caraballo,Indhira Orozco,Liliana Mu?oz
Boletín chileno de parasitología , 2001,
Abstract: Un estudio fue realizado en relación a establecer la presencia de parásitos intestinales en 35 pacientes infectados con el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH), desde julio 1997 a octubre 1998, admitidos en el Hospital Universitario "Ruiz y Páez" de Ciudad Bolívar, Venezuela. Parásitos fueron detectados en heces usando diversos métodos para la investigación de protozoos y hemintos, concentración éter-formalina, tinción de Kinyoung y tricromico. Edad, sexo, estado clínico de la infección de VIH fueron registrados para cada participante del estudio. Todos los pacientes presentaron diarrea crónica. En 20 pacientes infectados con VIH (57%), uno o más parásitos intestinales fueron encontrados. Los protozoos más frecuentemente encontrados fueron: Blastocystis hominis (28,6%), Cryptosporidium sp. (22,8%) e Isospora belli (2,9%). Microsporidia no fueron detectados. Estos datos enfatizan la importancia de los portozoos oportunistas en pacientes infectados con VIH.
Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
Nihar Dash, Mansour Al-Zarouni, Khurshid Anwar and Debadatta Panigrahi
Human Parasitic Diseases , 2012, DOI: 10.4137/HPD.S5081
Abstract: A survey of prevalence of intestinal parasites among the expatriates and native Emirati people attending Ministry of Health hospitals in Sharjah, United Arab Emirate was performed during the year 2008 and 2009. Stool examination from 10,514 patients (64% expatriates and 36% native Emiratis) was performed. Eight hundred fourteen specimens of the 10,514 examined were found to be positive for intestinal parasites. The infection rates were 15.7% and 3.2% among the native and expatriate population respectively (odds ratio = 5.5). The rate of infection in males (58%) was higher than in females (42%). Overall, protozoa infections (92.2%) were higher than the helminth infections (7.8%). Entamoeba histolytica (71.8%) and Giardia lamblia (17.5%) were the commonest intestinal parasites identified. Among the helminths, Ancylostoma dudenale and Ascaris lumbricoides were the common ones. In comparison to helminthic infestations, protozoa infections were more common among the native Emirati population than the expatriate population. The high prevalence rate of intestinal parasitic infections among the local Emirati people clearly indicates that there is continuous ongoing transmission of various parasitic infections in the community.
Anemia and intestinal parasitic infections in primary school students in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil
Tsuyuoka, Reiko;Bailey, J. Wendy;Guimar?es, Alzira M. d'Avila Nery;Gurgel, Ricardo Q.;Cuevas, Luis E.;
Cadernos de Saúde Pública , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-311X1999000200026
Abstract: anemia is estimated to affect half the school-age children and adolescents in developing countries. the main causes are parasitic infections, malaria, and low iron intake. this study aimed to describe the prevalence of anemia, parasitic infections, and nutritional status of children attending public primary schools in aracaju, northeast brazil. of 360 students, 26.7% were anemic, and prevalence was higher in children under 8 and over 15 years of age. overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 42%, with ascaris lumbricoides (28.7%), trichuris trichiura (15.6%), and hookworm (1.7%) most frequently found. there was an association between parasitic infections and poor sanitary conditions, but there was no association between anemia and presence of intestinal parasites. height-for-age z scores were lower than the nchs standard, and prevalence of stunting was 5.4%. although intestinal parasites were not associated with anemia, children with parasites had lower nutritional indices (weight- and height-for-age z scores) than those without parasites.
Anemia and intestinal parasitic infections in primary school students in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil  [cached]
Tsuyuoka Reiko,Bailey J. Wendy,Guimar?es Alzira M. d'Avila Nery,Gurgel Ricardo Q.
Cadernos de Saúde Pública , 1999,
Abstract: Anemia is estimated to affect half the school-age children and adolescents in developing countries. The main causes are parasitic infections, malaria, and low iron intake. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of anemia, parasitic infections, and nutritional status of children attending public primary schools in Aracaju, Northeast Brazil. Of 360 students, 26.7% were anemic, and prevalence was higher in children under 8 and over 15 years of age. Overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 42%, with Ascaris lumbricoides (28.7%), Trichuris trichiura (15.6%), and hookworm (1.7%) most frequently found. There was an association between parasitic infections and poor sanitary conditions, but there was no association between anemia and presence of intestinal parasites. Height-for-age Z scores were lower than the NCHS standard, and prevalence of stunting was 5.4%. Although intestinal parasites were not associated with anemia, children with parasites had lower nutritional indices (weight- and height-for-age Z scores) than those without parasites.
Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV patients in Benin City, Nigeria
FO Akinbo, CE Okaka, R Omoregie
Libyan Journal of Medicine , 2010,
Abstract: This study was carried out to determine the presence of intestinal parasites and their correlation with CD4+ T-cell counts and demographics among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients in Benin City, Nigeria. Stool specimens from 2,000 HIV-positive patients and 500 controls (HIV-negative individuals) were examined for ova, cysts, or parasites, using standard procedures. In addition, patient’s blood samples were analyzed for CD4 counts by flow cytometry. An overall prevalence rate of 15.3% was observed among HIVpositive patients while 6.2% was noted among non-HIV subjects. HIV status was a significant (PB0.0001) risk factor for acquiring intestinal parasitic infections. Male gender, CD4 count B200 cell/ml, and diarrhea were significantly associated with an increased prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIVpositive patients. The level of education, occupation, and source of water among HIV patients significantly (PB0.0001) affected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most predominant parasite in both HIV-positive patients and controls. A CD4 count B200 cells/ml was significantly associated with only Isospora belli and Cryptosporidium infections. The presence of pathogenic intestinal parasites such as A. lumbricoides, hookworm, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichuris trichiura, and Taenia species among HIV-infected persons should not be neglected. Cryptosporidium species and I. belli were the opportunistic parasites observed in this study. Routine screening for intestinal parasites in HIV-positive patients is advocated.
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