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Professional Competences of Music Therapists Working in Post-stroke Rehabilitation  [cached]
Anita Forsblom,Esa Ala-Ruona
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of this qualitative study is to gain more insight into the skills and knowledge that music therapists feel they need in order to work successfully with people who have had an acute stroke. For this purpose, 6 music therapists were interviewed about their own particular specialist education. Another interview topic for them was to recount their subjective experiences of post-stroke rehabilitation work in hospitals and health care units, during the course of two projects: the Music Listening Project (=MUKU), which specifically used music listening during acute stroke rehabilitation; and the Active Music Therapy Project (=MT-STROKE), which used more active music therapy techniques. The interviews pointed to three key categories regarding the factors that are seen to affect clinical thinking: the first hinges on knowledge concerning the neurological basis of strokes; the second on patient interaction itself; and the third on the physiological and emotional aspects of music therapy. The results provide a better understanding of the tacit knowledge possessed by music therapists who work within Stroke Rehabilitation.
Music and Dance Therapy in Nigeria: The Task before the Potential Nigerian Music Therapists in the Twenty First Century
Charles O. Aluede,Pastor M. A. Iyeh
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2008,
Abstract: The use of music and dance as a palliative measure, diversionary means, audio-analgesic and to control pain, is found in the musical practices of Nigerians. These different categories of the use of music can be put into two classifications: the use of music as medicine and the use of music as accompaniment to other healing rites. This paper examines: definitions of music therapy, the concept of illness in the contemporary Nigerian society, and music therapy and its social relevance. While highlighting the emerging issues before the Nigerian music/dance therapists, this paper ends by making some suggestions aimed at enhancing the present level of practice in Nigeria.
Music and Dance Therapy in Nigeria: The Task before the Potential Nigerian Music Therapists in the Twenty First Century  [cached]
Charles O. Aluede,M. A. Iyeh
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2008,
Abstract: The use of music and dance as a palliative measure, diversionary means, audio-analgesic and to control pain, is found in the musical practices of Nigerians. These different categories of the use of music can be put into two classifications: the use of music as medicine and the use of music as accompaniment to other healing rites. This paper examines: definitions of music therapy, the concept of illness in the contemporary Nigerian society, and music therapy and its social relevance. While highlighting the emerging issues before the Nigerian music/dance therapists, this paper ends by making some suggestions aimed at enhancing the present level of practice in Nigeria.
Reflections on Change in Arts-based Research: The experience of two music therapists  [cached]
Deborah Melissa Seabrook,Carolyn Arnason
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2010,
Abstract: The process of engaging in arts-based research is unique; it draws upon the creative essence of the researcher to work with artistic forms which carry intangible information that is perhaps unknowable by other means. In this process, the researcher is engaged wholly; all faculties of the person are drawn into the artistic world. This article explores the experiences of two music therapists conducting arts-based research studies, weaving together distinct narratives with common themes. The reader is taken along the journey of two separate music therapy research projects: one whose participants are a group of music therapists, one whose participant is a child living with mental health challenges. Thinking retrospectively, the researchers discuss links between their personal artistry and the arts-based research process, exploring issues such as trust, creativity, and the credibility of information carried in artistic media. Visual art, musical excerpts and creative writing are included. By exploring the professional and personal journeys as music therapists in the arts-based research process we highlight the strengths and challenges of this approach that shaped our studies and gave light to emergent understandings through the arts.
Can Music Therapists Synergise With Medical Practitioners to Make Music Therapy Evidence-based?  [cached]
Sumathy Sundar
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2005,
Abstract: There is an increasing global need for music therapy practice to be evidence-based with more experimental research findings. This is particularly the case as music therapy is introduced as a complementary therapy in many medical settings, with special reference to integrated care. Can music therapy be really evidence-based as is the case in medicine? How practical is it? Can the multidimensional role that a music therapist plays in a therapeutic setting, her skills, the time she spends with the clients and the effects of music, all be compared to a medical approach? Should music therapists collaborate more with health professionals not only in practice, but also in research to make it evidence based? What are the strengths of music therapy in the medical profession? Oncology is a very challenging area in the medical field and likewise music therapy is challenging in an oncology setting. Many music therapists are interested in working in this challenging speciality in research. Here is an interview with a renowned Indian surgical oncologist, Dr. Ravi Kannan. He is keen on music therapy being a part of the integrated team in cancer care in India and emphasises the need for more research to be carried out that is evidence-based.
Collaborative Work: Negotiations between Music Therapists and Community Musicians in the Development of a South African Community Music Therapy Project  [cached]
Helen Oosthuizen,Sunelle Fouché,Kerryn Torrance
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2007,
Abstract: Music therapy in South Africa is slowly negotiating a practice that takes into account our continent's musical vibrancy, as well as contextual understandings of "health" and "illness." Although music therapy in the (so-called) developed world is situated within the paradigms of medicine, education, psychology and research - in the formal and often scientific sense - in South Africa, this practice needs to be re-defined to make it relevant to the contexts in which we work. The Music Therapy Community Clinic (MTCC) is a non-profit organisation whose aim is to provide music therapy services to previously disadvantaged communities in Cape Town, South Africa. Socio-political problems such as poverty, unemployment, gang violence and HIV and Aids have lead to the fragmentation and disintegration of many of these communities. The MTCC's Music for Life project emerged out of a need to provide after-school music activities and to reach a wider group of children than those seen for clinical music therapy sessions. As the project has developed and expanded, the music therapists have drawn in community musicians to offer an increasing range of musical activities to children. The collaboration between music therapists and community musicians has led to many questions about the roles and identities of each. This article is based on a presentation given by the MTCC at a Symposium for South African Arts Therapists held in Cape Town in June 2007. The article discusses the merits and challenges of the Music for Life Project and offers reflections from both community musicians and music therapists pertaining to our negotiated and changing roles as we continue to develop the project together.
Leptospirosis: A Silent Epidemic Disease  [PDF]
Maria Cristina Schneider,Michel Jancloes,Daniel F. Buss,Sylvain Aldighieri,Eric Bertherat,Patricia Najera,Deise I. Galan,Kara Durski,Marcos A. Espinal
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph10127229
Abstract: This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to leptospirosis, an endemic zoonotic disease that is a cause of many acute undifferentiated fevers, especially in tropical countries [1,2]. While it can be debated whether leptospirosis is an emerging disease, it is evident that it is becoming an emerging public health problem. It is recognized as a disease of epidemic potential that has a significant health impact in many parts of the world.
What Do Music Therapists Need to Know Before the Disaster Strikes?  [cached]
Masako Otera
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2012,
Abstract: The paper discusses required knowledge in preparation for a disaster relief. The author shares her experience of the Great East Japan Earthquake and reviews how she went through the post-disaster phase as a music therapist. The author has made three suggestions for change in music therapy as a disaster relief. First, specific topics on disaster relief should be included in music therapy educational courses. This should cover general information regarding natural and human-made disasters and disaster relief. Second, making connections with related organizations, both the individual and national level is also suggested. Third, the further accumulation of studies on music therapy as a disaster relief service is needed.
Music therapists’ practice-based research in cancer and palliative care: Creative methods and situated findings  [cached]
Clare O'Callaghan,Philippa Barry
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2009,
Abstract: Although randomized controlled trials are described as the gold standard in health care research, their superiority is being questioned in palliative care which is focused on addressing individualized needs to maximize life quality. We use creative practice-based research to examine the usefulness of our music therapy work amongst people with life threatening conditions. Examined voices include “collective” (patients, visitors, staff, and music therapist), "their” (patients or caregivers), "our” (a group of music therapists), and "my voice” (one music therapist). Data sources have included clinical journals, semi-structured questionnaires, interview responses, a focus group, reflexive groupwork supervision transcripts, and patients’ song lyrics. Findings, situated within varied theoretic lenses, substantiate music therapy’s role in oncology and palliative care settings. Readers are invited to devise creative ways to voice their clients’, bystanders’, and own wisdom about music therapy to meaningfully extend the knowledge base.
The silent HIV epidemic among pregnant women within rural Northern Tanzania
Khadija I Yahya-Malima, Bj?rg E Olsen, Mecky I Matee, Knut Fylkesnes
BMC Public Health , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-6-109
Abstract: We consecutively enrolled 1377 counselled and consenting pregnant women attending ANC clinics for the first time during the current pregnancy. The study was conducted in six antenatal clinics, within three divisions of rural Manyara and Singida regions in 2003/2004. Interviews were conducted and blood samples for routine purposes were collected and tested for anti-HIV IgG antibody anonymously, using Bionor HIV-1 & 2 assay ?.Among enrolees, 94% (1296/1377) participated fully. The overall prevalence of HIV was 2.0% (95%CI: 1.34–2.97). The highest HIV prevalence was among women aged between 15–19 years in both rural and remote rural populations. The odds of HIV infection was 4.3 (95%CI: 1.42–12.77) times among women reporting more than one lifetime sexual partners compared with those with one partner. HIV infection was associated with history of genital sores or foul smelling discharge, OR 6.8 (95%CI: 2.78–16.66) and age at first pregnancy (2.5 times higher likelihood of infection if before the age of 18 years versus at a later age).Including rural remote sites, as part of the national ANC routine surveillance, is crucial in order to discover imminent silent epidemics such as the one described in this paper. Scaling up HIV prevention efforts is mandatory to prevent the imminent escalation of the HIV epidemic highly associated with a history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), multiple sexual partners and pregnancies at a younger age. Ignorance of relevant knowledge and low utilisation of condoms underscores the urgency for large-scale preventive efforts. Research to capture a wider representation of the risk factors in the general population should be a priority to enable further customised HIV prevention efforts.Surveillance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics (ANC) has been the mainstay system of monitoring of HIV epidemic in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa [1-5]. Several studies from the 1
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