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The Availability of Original Data and Statistics: An Improvement in Good Publication Practice  [cached]
Morselli-Labate AM
JOP Journal of the Pancreas , 2003,
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the aspects of good publication practices, with particular reference to data analysis, and to propose an innovative initiative for improving the quality of scientific information in this field. Several committees within the scientific community provide information and publish guidelines in order to support scientists in the application of good publication practices and to improve quality in medical research. Those guidelines suggest that the possibility of verifying the original data warrants the reliability of the published results by reducing the occurrence of misconduct related to data analysis. The initiative proposed in this article is aimed at making the original data and the statistical reports available to the scientific community together with the actual paper. Such a practice is undoubtedly an improvement in the quality of publication permitting verification of the results as well as allowing for further elaboration of the same data.
Ethical dilemmas in scientific publication: pitfalls and solutions for editors
Gollogly,Laragh; Momen,Hooman;
Revista de Saúde Pública , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0034-89102006000400004
Abstract: editors of scientific journals need to be conversant with the mechanisms by which scientific misconduct is amplified by publication practices. this paper provides definitions, ways to document the extent of the problem, and examples of editorial attempts to counter fraud. fabrication, falsification, duplication, ghost authorship, gift authorship, lack of ethics approval, non-disclosure, 'salami' publication, conflicts of interest, auto-citation, duplicate submission, duplicate publications, and plagiarism are common problems. editorial misconduct includes failure to observe due process, undue delay in reaching decisions and communicating these to authors, inappropriate review procedures, and confounding a journal's content with its advertising or promotional potential. editors also can be admonished by their peers for failure to investigate suspected misconduct, failure to retract when indicated, and failure to abide voluntarily by the six main sources of relevant international guidelines on research, its reporting and editorial practice. editors are in a good position to promulgate reasonable standards of practice, and can start by using consensus guidelines on publication ethics to state explicitly how their journals function. reviewers, editors, authors and readers all then have a better chance to understand, and abide by, the rules of publishing.
Ethical dilemmas in scientific publication: pitfalls and solutions for editors  [cached]
Gollogly Laragh,Momen Hooman
Revista de Saúde Pública , 2006,
Abstract: Editors of scientific journals need to be conversant with the mechanisms by which scientific misconduct is amplified by publication practices. This paper provides definitions, ways to document the extent of the problem, and examples of editorial attempts to counter fraud. Fabrication, falsification, duplication, ghost authorship, gift authorship, lack of ethics approval, non-disclosure, 'salami' publication, conflicts of interest, auto-citation, duplicate submission, duplicate publications, and plagiarism are common problems. Editorial misconduct includes failure to observe due process, undue delay in reaching decisions and communicating these to authors, inappropriate review procedures, and confounding a journal's content with its advertising or promotional potential. Editors also can be admonished by their peers for failure to investigate suspected misconduct, failure to retract when indicated, and failure to abide voluntarily by the six main sources of relevant international guidelines on research, its reporting and editorial practice. Editors are in a good position to promulgate reasonable standards of practice, and can start by using consensus guidelines on publication ethics to state explicitly how their journals function. Reviewers, editors, authors and readers all then have a better chance to understand, and abide by, the rules of publishing.
Accelerating Scientific Publication in Biology  [PDF]
Ronald D. Vale
Computer Science , 2015,
Abstract: Scientific publications enable results and ideas to be transmitted throughout the scientific community. The number and type of journal publications also have become the primary criteria used in evaluating career advancement. Our analysis suggests that publication practices have changed considerably in the life sciences over the past thirty years. More experimental data is now required for publication, and the average time required for graduate students to publish their first paper has increased and is approaching the desirable duration of Ph.D. training. Since publication is generally a requirement for career progression, schemes to reduce the time of graduate student and postdoctoral training may be difficult to implement without also considering new mechanisms for accelerating communication of their work. The increasing time to publication also delays potential catalytic effects that ensue when many scientists have access to new information. The time has come for life scientists, funding agencies, and publishers to discuss how to communicate new findings in a way that best serves the interests of the public and the scientific community.
Scientific publication  [cached]
Getulio Teixeira Batista
Ambiente e água : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Science , 2006,
Abstract: The integrated management of a scientific journal using a digital system that operates from any place with access to the Internet allows the monitoring of an article from the submission to the publication as in the Electronic Journal Publishing System (SEER, Soares et al., 2004). This represents a great progress in the editorial process not only for saving paper and mail costs, but mainly for fostering the editor's communication with the authors and reviewers. The editor should be extremely careful in fomenting that interaction. The motivation for publications varies among submitters and could affect the different phases of the publication process. Many students submit manuscripts to accomplish course requirements and when they have to face the revision process they give up since they already accomplished the requirement and don't want to invest the necessary time for improving their article. The editor has the role of intermediating interactions in search of quality improvement. The editor should be more than a transmitter of the reviewers' observations; he should also interpret the suggestions and interact with the authors to guarantee that the revisions are appropriately implemented for the sake of the article improvement. When closing the first volume, the editorial board of Ambi-água has the satisfaction of manifesting that the continuous interaction with the authors and reviewers resulted in a minimum processing time from the submission to the journal issue publication.
Good practices for a literature survey are not followed by authors while preparing scientific manuscripts  [PDF]
D. R. Amancio,M. G. V. Nunes,O. N. Oliveira Jr.,L. da F. Costa
Computer Science , 2010, DOI: 10.1007/s11192-012-0630-z
Abstract: The number of citations received by authors in scientific journals has become a major parameter to assess individual researchers and the journals themselves through the impact factor. A fair assessment therefore requires that the criteria for selecting references in a given manuscript should be unbiased with respect to the authors or the journals cited. In this paper, we advocate that authors should follow two mandatory principles to select papers (later reflected in the list of references) while studying the literature for a given research: i) consider similarity of content with the topics investigated, lest very related work should be reproduced or ignored; ii) perform a systematic search over the network of citations including seminal or very related papers. We use formalisms of complex networks for two datasets of papers from the arXiv repository to show that neither of these two criteria is fulfilled in practice.
The scientific publication
Maria Romana Friedlander
Revista de Enfermagem UFPE On Line , 2008,
Abstract: We know that the search is the natural way for the science construction. However, its achievement is only one step towards the achievement of this scientific progress. If the search is not reported and disclosed may not be an effective contributor to growth of human welfare through the development of science.By publishing a scientific paper the researcher exposes knowledge and its results can be found and read by the readers interested, contributes to improving nursing care if its results are operated, allows be reviewed and criticized by others ones and collaborates with the quality journals that can only evolve if they are sought by the authors. So, in fact, contributes to the evolution of ideas, care, the profession and science; fulfils its role with the society to provide a service of scientific nature.
Scientific Publication in Nursing and Midwifery in Iran
Reza Negarandeh
Hayat Journal of Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery , 2012,
Abstract: Production of knowledge in nursing and midwifery is essential to develop body of knowledge and improve quality of health care. In recent years, growth rate of scientific publication in Iran was significant as it could be considered as a scientific jihad. Although everyone is proud of this accomplishment, an important question remaining in nursing and midwifery is that how the pace of scientific publication in these fields is consistent with the pace of scientific publication in other scientific fields. This editorial tries to answer this question.Through searching the Scopus for Iranian papers during 2008-2012 articles, I found 1063 articles in nursing and midwifery indexed in the Scopus. The number of articles was almost doubled per year within the last five years, excluding 2012. It implies coordination of scientific publication in nursing and midwifery with rapid growth of total scientific activities in other scientific fields in the country.On the other hand, findings showed that only 29 articles (2.7%) published by Iranian nursing and midwifery researchers were review articles. While, in the UK, 13.5% of articles in nursing and midwifery was review articles. This finding along with the importance of review articles as credible scientific evidence for clinical decision-making and improving management procedures shows the necessity of writing review articles by senior researchers in Iran.Comparing nationality of authors between Iranian articles with the UK articles showed that only 154 Iranian articles (about 10%) had a non-native author; while, in the UK articles, about half of the articles had non-English collaborating authors. This finding reveals the necessity for further efforts to international studies.Through searching the Pubmed and Web of Science for Iranian articles during 2008-2012, we found 390 and 174 Iranian articles, respectively. The lower rate of articles indexed in these two databases, comparing to the Scopus, indicates the necessity of designing and conducting high quality studies and submitting articles in journals indexed in these two databases. Writing articles which observe principles of scientific writing in proper English language can increase the probability of acceptance of articles in more valid journals. Indexing Iranian nursing and midwifery journals in authoritative indexes can increase the rate of scientific publication. It requires more attention of administrators and editors of Iranian scientific journals to this critical issue.
Toward a Good or Better Understanding of Best Practices  [cached]
David Reinking
Journal of Curriculum and Instruction , 2007,
Abstract: This commentary argues that seeking best practices in literacy instruction is not a good pursuit for the field. Instead, it argues that it would be better for the field to identify good practice, better practice, and malpractice. Further, it discusses the possible meanings of best practice and why each meaning is inadequate, relatively meaningless, or potentially misleading when compared to the concepts of good and better practice. These possible meanings include best practice as relatively good practice, as what most or expert teachers do, as achievement of valued outcomes, and as scientific evidence. Lastly, this commentary discusses why focusing on good and better practice would be better for the field and suggests some implications of that shift in perspective.
Best Practices for Scientific Computing  [PDF]
Greg Wilson,D. A. Aruliah,C. Titus Brown,Neil P. Chue Hong,Matt Davis,Richard T. Guy,Steven H. D. Haddock,Katy Huff,Ian M. Mitchell,Mark Plumbley,Ben Waugh,Ethan P. White,Paul Wilson
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: Scientists spend an increasing amount of time building and using software. However, most scientists are never taught how to do this efficiently. As a result, many are unaware of tools and practices that would allow them to write more reliable and maintainable code with less effort. We describe a set of best practices for scientific software development that have solid foundations in research and experience, and that improve scientists' productivity and the reliability of their software.
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