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Sedimentation rate in dengue: an explanation based on proposed hypothesis on weight and erythrocyte sedimentation
Viroj Wiwanitkit
Iranian Journal of Medical Hypotheses & Ideas , 2010,
Abstract: "nDengue is an important mosquito borne viral infection. Focusing on the hematological finding in dengue, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate is varied. The exact explanation for this observation is unclear. Here, the author uses the previously already proposed hypothesis on weight and erythrocyte sedimentation for giving explanation of the observed sedimentation in dengue. This new explanation can fit with the already published observation in medical literature and indicates that erythrocyte sedimentation rate might be a useful predictor and classifier for kinds of dengue based on its severity.
Malarial Parasite Infection and Increase of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate
Viroj Wiwanitkit
Iranian Journal of Medical Hypotheses & Ideas , 2008,
Abstract: A difference in the sedimentation of red blood cells from healthy and non-healthy ones can be seen. To support a previously published work on the idea that red blood cell inclusion could increase of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The author hereby studied the ESR in the malarial infection model. It could be seen that ESR is increased in malarial infection and varies on the intensity of infection.
Red Blood Cell Inclusion Will Increase of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate
Viroj Wiwanitkit
Iranian Journal of Medical Hypotheses & Ideas , 2008,
Abstract: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate is an important laboratory test in hematology. Inclusion body is an abnormal addition within red blood cell that can occur in cases of many abnormalities. Inclusion body is an object and has mass therefore, it poses its specific weight which can modify the normal sedimentation of red blood cell. Here, the author proposed the mechanism that reduce the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in splenectomized thalassemia and further imply for other conditions with inclusion body in red blood cell. It can demonstrate that the increase of additional mass due to inclusion body can reduce the time for sedimentation.
Erythrocyte sedimentation rate as a marker for coronary heart disease  [cached]
Yayan J
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2012,
Abstract: Josef YayanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, GermanyBackground: Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction frequently present without evidence of cardiac-specific heart enzymes by laboratory analysis or specific pathologic electrocardiogram findings. The current study analyzed the efficacy of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate as an additional potential indicator for coronary heart disease, the aim being to enable quicker identification of patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction so that they can be more rapidly treated.Methods: Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction who had undergone a heart catheter examination were included in the study. The diagnosis of acute coronary heart disease was made by the physician who performed coronary angiography. Patients without coronary heart disease were used as a control group. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured in all patients. Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction and an inflammatory or tumor disease were excluded.Results: The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in 79 (58.09%) of 136 patients; 69 (50.74%) patients (95% confidence interval ±8.4%, 42.34%–59.14%) had coronary heart disease and a prolonged erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in ten (7.35%) patients (95% confidence interval ±4.39%, 2.96%–11.74%) without coronary heart disease by coronary angiography. The specificity of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate for coronary heart disease was 70.59% and the sensitivity was 67.65%.Conclusion: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate may be a useful additional diagnostic criterion for coronary heart disease.Keywords: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, coronary angiography
The Effect of Isoniazid (INH) on Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in the Lizard, Uromastix hardwickii  [PDF]
Mahmood Ahmad,Ruqaiya Hasan,Tazeen Naim,Mansoor Ahmad
Journal of Applied Sciences , 2003,
Abstract: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate of isoniazid treated lizard was worked out. The gradual decrease for day 5 to day 10 and day 15 was found to be statistically significant. This is indicative of increase in erythrocyte membrane permeability with increase in the span of treatment. Newer cells are flooded in the blood stream due to loss of older cells. Newer cell resist sedimentation on day 10 and day 15.
Extreme elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in children  [cached]
Abbag Fuad,Al Qahtani Jobran
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2007,
Abstract: Background: Extreme elevation the of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR?100 mm/hour) is usually associated with significant diseases. This study was performed to assess its significance in pediatric patients seen in Aseer Central Hospital. Methods: All ESRs performed for children between September 2001 and December 2002 were reviewed. The medical records of those with an ESR>100 mm/hr (group 1) were reviewed for age, sex, diagnosis, ESR value, hemoglobin (Hgb) value and leukocyte counts. The diagnoses were divided into seven categories: malignancy, connective tissue diseases (CTDs), tropical infections, mild infections, severe infections, renal diseases and miscellaneous. One hundred forty-five patients with an ESR< 100 mm/hr (group 2) were randomly selected for comparison. Results: Of 2540 ESRs, 99 were> 100 mm/hr (3.9%). There were 54 males and 45 females and the mean age was 72±48.2 months. Infection was the most common cause (49.5%), followed by CTDs (26.3%), malignancy (12.1%) and renal diseases (8.1%). Malignancy was associated with the lowest Hgb value (8.2 g/dL). A compari--son between group 1 and group 2 considering each diagnostic category separately showed that group 1 patients with mild infections had significantly higher mean leukocyte counts and that group 1 patients with CTDs had significantly lower Hgb values than group 2 patients with the same diagnoses, but there were no significant differences between the other diagnostic categories. Conclusion: The most common cause of extreme elevation of ESR is infection. This extreme elevation may be used as a sickness index, but not as a screening tool for any disease.
C-Reactive Protein, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and Orthopedic Implant Infection  [PDF]
Kerryl E. Piper,Marta Fernandez-Sampedro,Kathryn E. Steckelberg,Jayawant N. Mandrekar,Melissa J. Karau,James M. Steckelberg,Elie F. Berbari,Douglas R. Osmon,Arlen D. Hanssen,David G. Lewallen,Robert H. Cofield,John W. Sperling,Joaquin Sanchez-Sotelo,Paul M. Huddleston,Mark B. Dekutoski,Michael Yaszemski,Bradford Currier,Robin Patel
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009358
Abstract: C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) have been shown to be useful for diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection. Little information is available on CRP and ESR in patients undergoing revision or resection of shoulder arthroplasties or spine implants.
The Effect of Mefenamic Acid on the Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in the Lizard, Uromastix hardwickii  [PDF]
Mahmood Ahmad,Mansoor Ahmad,Ruqaiya Hasan,Anila Qureshi
Journal of Biological Sciences , 2005,
Abstract: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate of mefenamic acid (Ponstan) treated lizard was studied. There was gradual decrease following 7.1, 10.5 and 14.0 mg mL-1 day-1 for 12 days in the three respective groups. Thus ESR value increases in relation to the increase in the amount of mefenamic acid.
Erythrocyte sedimentation rate as a marker for coronary heart disease
Yayan J
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S29284
Abstract: ythrocyte sedimentation rate as a marker for coronary heart disease Original Research (2509) Total Article Views Authors: Yayan J Published Date April 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 219 - 223 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S29284 Received: 17 December 2011 Accepted: 08 February 2012 Published: 11 April 2012 Josef Yayan Department of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, Germany Background: Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction frequently present without evidence of cardiac-specific heart enzymes by laboratory analysis or specific pathologic electrocardiogram findings. The current study analyzed the efficacy of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate as an additional potential indicator for coronary heart disease, the aim being to enable quicker identification of patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction so that they can be more rapidly treated. Methods: Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction who had undergone a heart catheter examination were included in the study. The diagnosis of acute coronary heart disease was made by the physician who performed coronary angiography. Patients without coronary heart disease were used as a control group. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured in all patients. Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction and an inflammatory or tumor disease were excluded. Results: The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in 79 (58.09%) of 136 patients; 69 (50.74%) patients (95% confidence interval ±8.4%, 42.34%–59.14%) had coronary heart disease and a prolonged erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in ten (7.35%) patients (95% confidence interval ±4.39%, 2.96%–11.74%) without coronary heart disease by coronary angiography. The specificity of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate for coronary heart disease was 70.59% and the sensitivity was 67.65%. Conclusion: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate may be a useful additional diagnostic criterion for coronary heart disease.
Evaluation of an automated erythrocyte sedimentation rate analyzer as compared to the Westergren manual method in measurement of erythrocyte sedimentation rate  [cached]
Subramanian Arulselvi,Rangarajan Kanchana,Pandey Ravindra,Gandhi Jatin
Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology , 2011,
Abstract: Context: Monitor 100 (Electa Lab, Italy) is a newly developed automated method for measurement of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Aims: The aim of our study was to compare the ESR values by Monitor 100 against the standard Westergren method. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at a Level I trauma care center on 200 patients. The samples taken were as per the recommendations charted out by International Council for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH) for comparing automated and manual Westergrens method. Statistical Analysis Used: Bland and Altman statistical analysis was applied for evaluating Monitor 100 against the conventional Westergren method. Results: The analysis revealed a low degree of agreement between the manual and automated methods especially for higher ESR values, mean difference -11.2 (95% limits of agreement, -46.3 to 23.9) and mean difference -13.4 (95% limits of agreement-58.9 to 32.1) for 1 and 2 hours, respectively. This discrepancy which is of clinical significance was less evident for ESR values in the normal range <25 mm/hour (-7.7 mean of difference; -18.9 to 3.5 limits of agreement). Conclusions: The fully automated system Monitor 100 for ESR measurement tends to underestimate the manual ESR readings. Hence it is recommended that a correction factor be applied for the range of ESR values while using this equipment. Further studies and validation experiments would be required.
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