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DAIRY FARMING IN INDIA
Dr R.D. Deshmukh
Indian Streams Research Journal , 2012,
Abstract: India is a country of farming. Cows and buffaloes are not only infrastructure part of farm but cow & buffaloes are important part of the life of human beings. Milk is total food of human lives. Today the population of India is near about 121 crores and each with farming, In Maharashtra small farmer having four to five acres of land is on large-scale. They are not only depending on farming but also on milk production business i.e. dairy farming. Therefore it is necessary to select dairy farm is as joint business with farming
ASSESSMENT OF PROFITABILITY OF DAIRY SECTOR IN ALBANIA  [PDF]
Maksim Me?o,Remzi Sula,Remzi Keco,Ardian ?erava
Annals : Food Science and Technology , 2010,
Abstract: In the process of approximation to the European Union (EU), Albania seeks potential to increase competiveness andfood standards to improve import / export relation with agriculture and food products. Among the traditionallyproduced agricultural goods livestock rearing and particularly milk production activities have a long tradition inAlbania due to the favourable natural resources for large and small ruminants. Due to the significance of livestock andmilk production, particularly in rural areas, MoAF has selected the milk sector as a policy priority. The Albaniangovernment and MoAF are inclined to support primary production and the dairy industry. Evaluation of performance atfarm level is not possible because are missing the data. Official data (statistical yearbook of MAFCP) don’t includeinformation at farm level for each product. Farm-level dairy production in Albania is characterized by small-scale,peasant farming system based on extensive cattle grazing with little additional input. Given the current structure of thesector, milk production and processing is a domestically profitable activity, so that potential export opportunities couldbe sough.
Factors influencing energy demand in dairy farming
S Kraatz, W Berg, R Brunsch
South African Journal of Animal Science , 2010,
Abstract: The efficiency of energy utilization is one of the key indicators for developing more sustainable agricultural practices. Factors influencing the energy demand in dairy farming are the cumulative energy demand for feed-supply, milk yield as well as the replacement rate of cows. The energy demand of dairy farming is assessed on the basis of direct and indirect energy inputs. The comparison of different replacement rates and milk yields shows clearly that both have a considerable influence on the energy intensity of dairy farming. The feed energy requirement/kg milk produced is decreased with an increase in individual performance of the animals. Nevertheless, this effect diminishes gradually with milk yields higher than 8 000 kg/cow/year. Additionally, energy demand increases with higher replacement rates of cows. Milk yields higher than 8 000 kg/cow/year can clearly not compensate for the increase in the cumulative energy demand. Therefore milk yields considerably higher than 8 000 kg/cow/year are not advisable from the view-point of the cumulative energy demand for feed-supply. A decreasing service life of the dairy cows (increasing replacement rate) causes a higher energy demand per kg milk, but its influence is only marginal.
Factors influencing energy demand in dairy farming
S Kraatz, W Berg, R Brunsch
South African Journal of Animal Science , 2009,
Abstract: The efficiency of energy utilization is one of the key indicators for developing more sustainable agricultural practices. Factors influencing the energy demand in dairy farming are the cumulative energy demand for feed-supply, milk yield as well as the replacement rate of cows. The energy demand of dairy farming is assessed on the basis of direct and indirect energy inputs. The comparison of different replacement rates and milk yields shows clearly that both have a considerable influence on the energy intensity of dairy farming. The feed energy requirement/kg milk produced is decreased with an increase in individual performance of the animals. Nevertheless, this effect diminishes gradually with milk yields higher than 8 000 kg/cow/year. Additionally, energy demand increases with higher replacement rates of cows. Milk yields higher than 8 000 kg/cow/year can clearly not compensate for the increase in the cumulative energy demand. Therefore milk yields considerably higher than 8 000 kg/cow/year are not advisable from the view-point of the cumulative energy demand for feed-supply. A decreasing service life of the dairy cows (increasing replacement rate) causes a higher energy demand per kg milk, but its influence is only marginal.
Dairy Sector in the Crises: The Case of Turkey
Sema Gun,I. Coskun Ceylan,Ilkay Dellal,Gulsen Keskin,Emine Olhan,Gursel Dellal
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.429.435
Abstract: Agriculture especially animal product markets are vulnerable in the crises times. The 2006-2008 period has passed within different crises in entire world. Each crisis has an effect on agricultural sector. Extreme meteorological events due to climate change, food crises and finally Global Financial Crises in 2006-2008 affect the number of actors. In this study, it was studied that the outlook of the agricultural sector and dairy sub sector in Turkey in this period. Therefore, general structure of crises, economic and sectoral developments were given. And dairy sub sector expected to be mostly affected was examined as a case.
Global Competitiveness Of Dairy Farming In Karnataka
A.SACHINDRA BABU, M.RESHMA
International Journal of Innovative Research in Science, Engineering and Technology , 2013,
Abstract: The analysis of Global competitiveness has been carried out to identify the overall impact on production and consumption in the state. Dairy production policy should have two clear focuses, private incentives to motivate farmers and other intermediaries to achieve their objectives. In addition, the social incentive, which influences the entries society, is primarily concerned with economic growth and equity. Whether the dairy industry imposes a drain or gain to the economy? Will a drop in world dairy prices affect the trade position? What are the types of support needed for the industry in terms of infrastructure, extension and research? What are the merit subsidies that can be provided to the dairy industry? These and related issues are addressed in this analysis. The private and social concepts are distinct and important from a policy perspective. The difference can provide valuable insights how policy can improve economic performance. It can provide ways of comparing and ranking commodity system in terms of profitability and comparative advantage. This paper deals private and social perspective in the context of analyzing performance of agricultural commodity system, which employs a simple analytical tool called the Policy Analysis Matrix (PAM).
Some Aspects for Raising of Economic Competitiveness of Dairy Farming
Sandor Kalmar
Agriculturae Conspectus Scientificus (ACS) , 2003,
Abstract: In Hungary the last decade the number of cattle stock practically hasdiminished 50% because of the unfavourable economic conditions. This fact and the nearing joining to EU reflect the important for developing dairy farming in the knew circumstances. Theoretically the over production is favourable for the profitability, because of the decreasing of the specific stable cost. Unfortunately, this way is closedfor the Hungarian dairy farming because of the quota system. Raising of the milk quality is more possible and real way for raising of the economic competitiveness in the milk farming, especially in lower classes. In connection profit, price and cost it can be said, that the production cost of milk is lower at the private farms, but the milk price is higher at company farms every year. This means, that private farms are responsive to cost (more economical production, adaptation to environment, etc.), and the companies are responsive to price (higher milk quality, technical level, etc.). The two opposite tendencies result in higher income at private farms. The production cost, of course, depends on a lot of factors (labour, technology,keeping, etc.) but the feed cost plays decisive role. The feed cost variation is 2-3 times more than the average milk cost variation, so we can say, that environmentally adapted milk production throw the feed cost will play decisive role in milk economics. This fact especially will be true in the next quota system and guaranteed price! Purpose of the investigation was to examine some opportunities for raising of competitiveness of dairy farming.
Analysis and Classification of Nutritional, Husbandry and Health Related Indicators to Define Specialist Dairy Farming: Nutritional and Production Measures at Dairy Farming
Sulhattin Yasar,Hikmet Orhan
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2229.2238
Abstract: In this full-text research study the level of specialist dairy farming in the Burdur region of Turkey, in comparison to its recent alignment with European Union (EU) was investigated. The experimental parameters were based on various nutritional, husbandry, breeding, health and product safety and quality indicators which were simple and decisive in the perspective of dairy policies. An assessment based on other important zootechnical indicators was previously published. The present study was conducted in the form of a face-to-face survey, comprised of questions asked to the farmers. The obtained results were stored in a spreadsheet for further processing. The data was transformed to numerical values before statistical analysis. A multiple-response analysis was performed to define the classification of dairy farms into qualified, averaged and unqualified which were established according to algorithmic rules established within each set of indicators. Knowledge of animal nutrition, expertise level of feeds and feedings, statue of reproduction and breeding and awareness in animal health and product safety and quality were determined and analysed. The results revealed that the level of sustainability in other word, specialist dairy farms was only 41% of total whereas 33% were unqualified (a high figure) and 26% averaged farms. In summary, the specialist dairy farming system in Burdur accounts only 41% of total. This figure is too low as compared to the overall European figure of 83%. This clearly indicated that Turkish dairy farming is not convincing during the EU enlargement process where some serious reforms were made while their effects were not yet seen. This was explained by a comparative discussion, suggesting the need for intervention programmes to be undertaken in the region by the concerned public and private bodies.
Effect of Socio-Demographic Characteristics on Kenyan Smallholder Dairy Farmers’ Adaptive Strategies to Climate Change Effects  [PDF]
Charles Okech Odhiambo, Chlirukovian Bwire Wasike, Harun Okello Ogindo
Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (ACS) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/acs.2019.94037
Abstract: Climate change (CC) impedes smallholder dairy industry in Kenya. Consequently, farmers’ adaptation to CC effects would greatly determine their resilience, profitability, and sustainable contribution to the economy. Socio-demography among other factors, determine smallholder farmers’ adaptive strategies to CC effects. This study sought to understand how smallholder dairy farmers in South Western Kenya adapt to climate changes and determine the relationship between famers’ adaptive strategies and their socio-demographics of sex, age, marital status, highest educational level, household size, and experience in dairying. Concurrent Fixed Mixed Methods were used to collect primary and secondary data. Reports and papers were reviewed for temperature and precipitation data, dairy population, production trends, and farmers’ socio-demographics. A survey questionnaire was administered to 367 smallholder dairy household heads with 10 years’ experience obtained through multi-stage sampling of respondents from 4 sub counties of Migori county. The data collected included the respondents’ socio-demographics, climate changes and adaptability to CC effects. Key informant interviews (KIIs) were conducted with heads of government departments of Livestock Production, Cooperative Development, Meteorology, Environment and Agriculture Sector Development Support Programme (ASDSP) in Migori County. Others included the leadership of Rongo Dairy Farmers’ Cooperative Society, Lichota Livestock Development Farm, and a Research Officer for Livestock Production Systems with Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO). Focus group discussions (FGDs), on the other hand, were conducted with old men and women (aged 60 years and above), and farmer groups from Rongo Dairy Farmers Cooperative Society, Cham Gi Wadu Dairy and Multipurpose Cooperative Society, and East Sakwa Farmers’ Development Group. These were obtained purposively based on dairying experience. Descriptive statistics (percentages) were used to describe climate change effect on smallholder dairying and farmers’ adaptation. Percentages, minimum and maximum values, means, range, and standard deviations were used to describe respondents’ socio-demographics. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to determine the effect of farmers’ socio-demographics on their adaptive strategies to CC effects. Results indicated that individually, male farmers were more likely to adopt mixed crop and livestock farming (Odds = 3.97; p = 0.02) and experience an increasing trend in income earning from milk sales (Odds = 0.63;
Training needs of farm women in dairy farming  [cached]
Durgga Rani V. And Subhadra M.R.
Veterinary World , 2009,
Abstract: A study was conducted in Thrissur taluk of Thrissur district to assess the training needs of farm women engaged in dairy farming. It was found that out of the five major farm operations studied, the farm women needed training the most in housing. The minor operations preferred the most for knowledge need were proper design of cattle shed, selection of breeds, compounding balanced feed using locally available ingredients, vaccination and banking and insurance. As for skill need, construction of scientific low cost cattle shed, selection of breeds, compounding balanced feed using locally available ingredients, symptoms of common diseases and banking and insurance were preferred the most. [Vet World 2009; 2(6.000): 221-223]
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