oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis after primary pterygium surgery with conjunctival autograft
Yamazoe K, Shimazaki-Den S, Otaka I, Hotta K, Shimazaki J
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S24885
Abstract: rgically induced necrotizing scleritis after primary pterygium surgery with conjunctival autograft Case report (2508) Total Article Views Authors: Yamazoe K, Shimazaki-Den S, Otaka I, Hotta K, Shimazaki J Published Date November 2011 Volume 2011:5 Pages 1609 - 1611 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S24885 Katsuya Yamazoe1,2, Seika Shimazaki-Den1, Isao Otaka3, Kazuki Hotta2, Jun Shimazaki1,4 1Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College, Ichikawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, 3Yokohama Sotetsu Building Eye Center, Yokohama, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Background: Although pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft is a widely performed surgical procedure, surgically induced necrotizing scleritis (SINS) following such surgery is extremely rare. Methods: A 68-year-old man underwent nasal pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft uneventfully. On postoperative day 17, the conjunctival graft was avascular, with epithelial defect. Although topical steroid and antibacterial treatments were continued, the graft and sclera melted, with the ischemic sclera showing gradual thinning. The thinning area spread to the adjoining cornea, and active inflammation with epithelial defect was observed adjacent to the site of thinning. Results: Systemic and microbiological examination was noncontributory. The patient was suspected of having SINS, and administration of oral prednisolone was started. Although the necrotic area was reduced temporarily, medication was discontinued due to nausea, and the area of thinning increased. Conjunctival flap surgery was later performed, and the graft was well accepted. Conclusions: SINS must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with scleritis following pterygium surgery, especially if radiation or mitomycin C has not been used.
Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis after primary pterygium surgery with conjunctival autograft  [cached]
Yamazoe K,Shimazaki-Den S,Otaka I,Hotta K
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2011,
Abstract: Katsuya Yamazoe1,2, Seika Shimazaki-Den1, Isao Otaka3, Kazuki Hotta2, Jun Shimazaki1,4 1Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College, Ichikawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, 3Yokohama Sotetsu Building Eye Center, Yokohama, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Background: Although pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft is a widely performed surgical procedure, surgically induced necrotizing scleritis (SINS) following such surgery is extremely rare. Methods: A 68-year-old man underwent nasal pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft uneventfully. On postoperative day 17, the conjunctival graft was avascular, with epithelial defect. Although topical steroid and antibacterial treatments were continued, the graft and sclera melted, with the ischemic sclera showing gradual thinning. The thinning area spread to the adjoining cornea, and active inflammation with epithelial defect was observed adjacent to the site of thinning. Results: Systemic and microbiological examination was noncontributory. The patient was suspected of having SINS, and administration of oral prednisolone was started. Although the necrotic area was reduced temporarily, medication was discontinued due to nausea, and the area of thinning increased. Conjunctival flap surgery was later performed, and the graft was well accepted. Conclusions: SINS must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with scleritis following pterygium surgery, especially if radiation or mitomycin C has not been used. Keywords: scleritis, pterygium, pterygium surgery, conjunctival autograft, SINS
Necrotizing scleritis following diode laser trans-scleral cyclophotocoa- gulation  [cached]
Ganesh Sudha,Rishi Kapil
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 2006,
Abstract: We report a case of necrotizing scleritis following diode cyclo-photocoagulation (CPC). A-64-year-old-Asian Indian male presented with pseudophakic corneal decompensation with secondary angle closure glaucoma that was uncontrolled with maximum medical therapy. Trans-scleral diode CPC was performed in the inferior 180-degree section using a standard diode laser with a G-probe. One month later, the patient developed features suggestive of necrotizing scleritis that resolved with systemic steroid therapy. Necrotizing scleritis following diode CPC has been rarely reported. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the possible occurrence of surgically induced nectotizing scleritis following diode CPC.
Necrotizing scleritis as a complication of cosmetic eye whitening procedure
Theresa G Leung, James P Dunn, Esen K Akpek, Jennifer E Thorne
Journal of Ophthalmic Inflammation and Infection , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1869-5760-3-39
Abstract: Findings: This is a single case report. A 59-year-old Caucasian male with a history of blepharitis status post uncomplicated LASIK refractive surgery reported chronic conjunctival hyperemia for 15 years prior to undergoing a cosmetic eye whitening procedure. He presented to our clinic 12 months after the cosmetic eye whitening procedure with progressive bilateral necrotizing scleritis and scleral calcification.Chronic conjunctival hyperemia may prompt patients to seek surgical correction with cosmetic eye whitening procedures. However, conjunctival hyperemia secondary to tear deficiency and evaporative dry eye may predispose to poor wound healing. Serious complications including necrotizing scleritis may result from cosmetic eye whitening procedures and the use of topical mitomycin C.
Necrotizing Scleritis Associated with 5-Fluorouracil and Sub-Tenon’s Block in Patient with Previous Trabeculectomy: A Case Report  [PDF]
Tuan A. Tran, Jeremy O’Connor, Xavier Fagan, Tu Tran, Dan Nguyen
Open Journal of Ophthalmology (OJOph) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojoph.2013.33018
Abstract:

Necrotizing scleritis is the most severe form of scleritis with a significant threat to vision and globe integrity. It can be infectious, surgically induced necrotizing scleritis (SINS) or systemic autoimmune associated. We report a case of necrotizing scleritis associated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at the site of sub tenon’s block in a patient with previous trabeculectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of necrotizing scleritis associated with 5-FU. This may implicate alternative approaches to local anaesthetic techniques when using adjunctive 5-FU.

Subconjunctival dexamethasone implant for non-necrotizing scleritis
Heloisa Moraes Nascimento, Maíra Fran?a, Luciana Guadalupe García, Cristina Muccioli, Rubens Belfort
Journal of Ophthalmic Inflammation and Infection , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1869-5760-3-7
Abstract: In all patients, symptoms disappeared before day 7, and most of them were symptoms-free on day 2. The implant was visible at least up to day 45. One recurrence was noted in the 6-month follow-up in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and non-necrotizing diffuse scleritis and was treated with oral steroids. No patient developed ocular hypertension or any kind of complications during the follow-up period, except for subconjunctival hemorrhage.Dexamethasone implant was safely and effectively used as a local therapy for non-necrotizing scleritis.
The Choice of Pterygium Surgery Tactics  [PDF]
О.Ya. Buchko,Т.А. Tsyganova,М.М. Shishkin
Sovremennye Tehnologii v Medicine , 2011,
Abstract: The aim of the investigation is to state the main aspects responsible for the choice of pterygium surgery tactics. Materials and Methods. There were studied the patients operated on according to limbal auto- and allotransplantation. Control group consisted of patients operated on according to Mc Reynolds technique.Conclusion. Limbal auto- and allotransplantation should to be used in recurrences of pterygium, in extensive bilateral pterygium, and in severe associated systemic diseases.
Scleral Rupture Secondary to Idiopathic Non-Necrotizing Scleritis in a Dog  [PDF]
Lori J. Best,Shelley J. Newman,Daniel A. Ward,Diane V. H. Hendrix
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/193090
Abstract: Background. Canine granulomatous scleritis is an uncommon disease that can be classified as necrotizing or non-necrotizing. Clinical signs associated with scleritis are typically severe, resulting in pain and loss of vision, and response to treatment is often poor. Necrotizing scleritis has been previously associated with scleral rupture. Case Presentation. A 10-year-old male castrated Chihuahua was presented for periocular pain, tissue swelling adjacent to the limbus superiorly, chemosis, mild corneal edema and neovascularization adjacent to the superotemporal limbus in the right eye. The left eye was within clinically normal limits. Surgical exploration of the right eye revealed a scleral rupture at the inferonasal aspect of the globe. Histopathology revealed a non-necrotizing granulomatous scleritis with no infectious organisms visualized. Infectious disease testing and special histopathologic staining did not reveal an underlying infectious etiology. Conclusion. Granulomatous scleritis is a painful and vision-threatening disease that needs to be treated early and aggressively in order to avoid loss of vision or loss of the eye. Globe rupture secondary to severe non-necrotizing scleritis is an uncommon, but detrimental, clinical manifestation of this disease. This is the first case report of scleral rupture secondary to severe non-necrotizing scleritis and therefore represents a unique and interesting disease manifestation. 1. Background Scleritis is an uncommon and poorly understood disease process in dogs [1]. The sclera comprises approximately 80% of the fibrous outer portion of the eye and is the posterior continuation of the transparent cornea. The sclera is closely associated with several ocular tissues and for this reason secondary keratitis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, orbital cellulitis, and blepharitis may be seen in cases of primary scleritis [2]. The etiology of canine scleritis is often presumed to be immune-mediated due to the characteristic presence of granulomatous inflammatory infiltrates, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and inability to identify microorganisms by histopathology [3]. Other potential underlying causes of scleritis include Ehrlichia canis, Onchocerca spp., Toxoplasma gondii, trauma (including surgical trauma), and extension of panophthalmitis or orbital cellulitis [1, 3, 4]. In humans, granulomatous scleritis is often associated with systemic vascular or autoimmune collagen disorders including rheumatoid arthritis [5], Wegener’s granulomatosis [6], and systemic lupus erythematosus [7]. Some reported cases
Comparing techniques for pterygium surgery
Atilla Alpay, Suat Hayri Ugurbas, Berktug Erdogan
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S2767
Abstract: mparing techniques for pterygium surgery Original Research (7455) Total Article Views Authors: Atilla Alpay, Suat Hayri Ugurbas, Berktug Erdogan Published Date September 2008 Volume 2009:3 Pages 69 - 74 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S2767 Atilla Alpay, Suat Hayri Ugurbas, Berktug Erdogan Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Zonguldak, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak, Turkey Purpose: To compare various techniques of pterygium surgery including bare sclera, intraoperative mitomycin C application, conjunctival flap reconstruction, and conjunctival autografting technique. Methods: This study is designed to compare 4 currently used techniques in order to determine the complication and recurrence rates after pterygium exision. Included in the study were 77 eyes from 60 patients. Bare sclera technique was used to treat 21 primary pterygia; mitomycin C was used to treat 20 (16 primary, 4 recurrent) pterygia; 18 (17 primary, 1 recurrent) pterygia were treated by conjuntival flap reconstruction; and 18 (9 primary, 9 recurrent) pterygia were treated by conjunctival autografting technique. All patients who underwent surgery were followed up for between 6 months and 2 years. Results: Eight recurrences (38.09%) were observed in the bare sclera group whereas there were 5 (25%) recurrences in the mitomycin C group. In the conjunctival flap reconstruction group, 6 (33.33%) recurrences were detected. In the conjunctival autografting group, 3 recurrences were observed. There were no major complications threatening visual ability in the surgical patients. Conclusion: A comparison of the groups demonstrated that the recurrence rate was highest in the bare sclera group, and lowest in conjunctival autografting and mitomycin C treatment groups respectively. Although the conjunctival autografting technique is a more difficult and time consuming technique than the others, cosmetic and surgical results were found to be superior. We advise conjunctival autografting for the treatment of pterygium in view of the high recurrence rates of other techniques, and the possible complications of mitomycin C treatment for benign disease.
Comparing techniques for pterygium surgery  [cached]
Atilla Alpay,Suat Hayri Ugurbas,Berktug Erdogan
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2008,
Abstract: Atilla Alpay, Suat Hayri Ugurbas, Berktug ErdoganDepartment of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Zonguldak, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak, TurkeyPurpose: To compare various techniques of pterygium surgery including bare sclera, intraoperative mitomycin C application, conjunctival flap reconstruction, and conjunctival autografting technique.Methods: This study is designed to compare 4 currently used techniques in order to determine the complication and recurrence rates after pterygium exision. Included in the study were 77 eyes from 60 patients. Bare sclera technique was used to treat 21 primary pterygia; mitomycin C was used to treat 20 (16 primary, 4 recurrent) pterygia; 18 (17 primary, 1 recurrent) pterygia were treated by conjuntival flap reconstruction; and 18 (9 primary, 9 recurrent) pterygia were treated by conjunctival autografting technique. All patients who underwent surgery were followed up for between 6 months and 2 years.Results: Eight recurrences (38.09%) were observed in the bare sclera group whereas there were 5 (25%) recurrences in the mitomycin C group. In the conjunctival flap reconstruction group, 6 (33.33%) recurrences were detected. In the conjunctival autografting group, 3 recurrences were observed. There were no major complications threatening visual ability in the surgical patients.Conclusion: A comparison of the groups demonstrated that the recurrence rate was highest in the bare sclera group, and lowest in conjunctival autografting and mitomycin C treatment groups respectively. Although the conjunctival autografting technique is a more difficult and time consuming technique than the others, cosmetic and surgical results were found to be superior. We advise conjunctival autografting for the treatment of pterygium in view of the high recurrence rates of other techniques, and the possible complications of mitomycin C treatment for benign disease.Keywords: pterygium, comparing, techniques, mitomycin C
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.