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Subacute phase treatment of subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit with epidural hematoma in the frontal cranial fossa: Case report
Taro Mikami, Jiro Maegawa, Mayu Mutou Kuroda, Yasushi Yamamoto, Kazunori Yasumura
BMC Ophthalmology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2415-12-18
Abstract: This case report provides details on the clinical course of a 9-year-old girl with subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit. In this particular patient, a rare case of ipsilateral subfrontal extradural hematoma was also observed. Due to our performing the surgical intervention during the subacute stage, functional complications as well as cosmetic problems were avoided.Our results demonstrate that surgical treatments for subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit should be delayed until it can be confirmed that a patient has no other complications. On the other hand, once it has been confirmed that the patient has no other existing problems, immediate surgical therapy with a small skin incision followed by the setting of a drain is recommended in order to achieve an early resolution and avoid complications.
Hematoma subperiosteal de órbita: relato de caso
Chaves, Jacinto Barbosa Lay;Batista, Marcus Sabry Azar;Piske, Ronie Leo;Cunha, Kaile de Araújo;Almeida, Kelson James Silva;
Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia , 2007, DOI: 10.1590/S0004-27492007000400022
Abstract: we describe a sixteen years old male patient that suffered a craniocerebral trauma and presented at the emergency room, with ocular pain, palpebral hematoma and left eye proptosis. orbital computed tomography showed left subperiosteal orbital hematoma. a surgical drainage was performed. subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit is a rare cause of proptosis; its early diagnosis must be made in order to avoid possible complications.
Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit  [cached]
Dhir S,Munjal V,Staneezae N,Jain I
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1982,
Abstract:
Subperiosteal hematoma and orbital compression syndrome following minor frontal trauma in sickle cell anemia: case report
Procianoy, Fernando;Brand?o Filho, Mauro;Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e;Alencar, Victor Marques;
Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S0004-27492008000200024
Abstract: we report the case of an 11-year-old girl with sickle cell disease who presented to the emergency room after being hit by a mud pie in the left frontal region. examination evidenced left eye proptosis, eyelid swelling, reduced visual acuity and afferent pupillary defect, without any inflammatory signs such as fever, hyperemia or tenderness. computed tomography of the orbits showed a large superomedial subperiosteal hematoma in the left orbit. the patient was treated with canthotomy, cantholysis and surgical draining of the hematoma. two days after drainage she persisted with a subperiosteal hematoma and low visual acuity. a wide exploration of the orbital roof through a lid crease approach disclosed a thickened superior orbital rim with multiple bone defects along the roof and with continuous bleeding. hemostasis was accomplished with bone wax. orbital compression was resolved and the patient recovered her previous normal visual acuity.
Traumatic bilateral intraorbital (subperiosteal) hematoma associated with epidural hematoma: case report
Costa Jr, Leodante Batista da;Andrade, Agustinho de;Henriques, José Gilberto de Bastos;Cordeiro, Anderson Finotti;Maciel, Cícero do Juazeiro Job;
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria , 2003, DOI: 10.1590/S0004-282X2003000600030
Abstract: extradural hematoma (edh) is a frequent lesion, with an incidence varying from 0.2 to 6% in patients admitted to hospital due to traumatic head injury. the higher incidence is found in patients with more severe injuries. the association of edh with subperiosteal intraorbital hematomas is rarely reported, and we were not able to find in the literature any report of traumatic bilateral intraorbital hematomas and edh. we report this case of a 32 year-old man with bilateral intraorbital (subperiosteal) hematoma associated with unilateral edh. the lesions were treated surgically, but unfortunately with an unfavorable outcome.
Traumatic bilateral intraorbital (subperiosteal) hematoma associated with epidural hematoma: case report
Costa Jr Leodante Batista da,Andrade Agustinho de,Henriques José Gilberto de Bastos,Cordeiro Anderson Finotti
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria , 2003,
Abstract: Extradural hematoma (EDH) is a frequent lesion, with an incidence varying from 0.2 to 6% in patients admitted to hospital due to traumatic head injury. The higher incidence is found in patients with more severe injuries. The association of EDH with subperiosteal intraorbital hematomas is rarely reported, and we were not able to find in the literature any report of traumatic bilateral intraorbital hematomas and EDH. We report this case of a 32 year-old man with bilateral intraorbital (subperiosteal) hematoma associated with unilateral EDH. The lesions were treated surgically, but unfortunately with an unfavorable outcome.
Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit associated with subfrontal hematoma presenting as proptosis  [cached]
Agrawal Amit,Dwivedi Sankalp,Joshi Rajnish,Gupta Dilip
Neurology India , 2007,
Abstract:
Concomitant occurrence of subfrontal extradural hematoma and orbital subperiosteal hematoma: A rare entity  [cached]
Nayak Naren,Diyora Batuk,Kamble Hanmant,Modgi Rahul
Neurology India , 2010,
Abstract: Subfrontal extradural hematomas are uncommon, similar are orbital subperiosteal hematomas. Co-occurrence of both following head trauma is very rare. We describe co-occurrence of sub frontal extradural and orbital subperiosteal hematomas in four patients. The presenting symptoms were proptosis and visual complaints. Diagnosis was confirmed on computed tomography in three patients and magnetic resonance imaging in one patient. Frontal craniotomy and superior orbitotomy with evacuation of hematoma resulted in complete resolution of proptosis and visual symptoms. We emphasize on the early diagnosis of this rare condition and also emergency treatment to prevent permanent visual loss.
Clinical features of posttraumatic epilepsy in children  [cached]
Anna Prokhorova
Medical and Health Science Journal , 2011,
Abstract: In order to identify clinical-age relationship in children with posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE), 78 patients aged from 3 to 14 years were examined. The mean duration of latent period was 8.9±0.79 months. Studies have shown that the latent period of PTE in children is largely dependent on child’s age at the time of traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurrence than on its severity. Moreover, each age group was characterized by certain types of epileptic attacks: polymorphic seizures with predominance of primary-generalized ones prevailed in the younger age-group children (3-6 years), secondary-generalized seizures developed for 52.2% of the total number of paroxysms in the middle age-group children (7-10 years), and partial seizures appeared in the older age-group (63.3 %).
Correction of Posttraumatic Enophthalmos  [PDF]
Ron Hazani,Michael J. Yaremchuk
Archives of Plastic Surgery , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5999/aps.2012.39.1.11
Abstract: Management of posttraumatic enophthalmos can present as a challenge to the reconstructivesurgeon, particularly in cases of late presentation. This article reviews the pertinent anatomyof the orbit, diagnostic modalities, indications for surgery, and surgical approaches as theyrelate to the treatment of posttraumatic enophthalmos. Internal orbital reconstructionhas evolved to an elegant procedure incorporating various biologic or alloplastic implants,including anatomical pre-bent implants. Successful repair of late enophthalmos has beendemonstrated in multiple recent studies and is likely related to the precision with whichorbital anatomy can be restored.
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