oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
What's New In Dermatology  [PDF]
Dr Sally Ibbotson
Scottish Universities Medical Journal , 2012,
Abstract: A brief summary of the latest developments in dermatology important for medical students to know for placements and ward teaching.
Dermatological manifestations of measles infection in hospitalised paediatric patients observed in the 2009 - 2011 Western Cape epidemic
Bianca Tod, Henri Carrara, Michael Levin, Gail Todd
South African Medical Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Introduction. Measles is an acute vaccine-preventable infection common in childhood. In this study, the common dermatological signs of measles were designated the ‘classic dermatological measles syndrome’. Methods. We attempted to ascertain the prevalence of ‘non-classic’ dermatological measles presentation in 69 paediatric patients admitted to New Somerset Hospital, Western Cape, during the recent South African measles outbreak. The patients were examined and photographed, after informed consent had been obtained, and findings were assessed by 1 dermatology consultant and 6 dermatology registrars. Measles infection was confirmed in 38 of the patients by means of IgM testing. The data were analysed using Stata version 11.1 statistical software. Outcomes. Of the group, 17.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.2 - 26.6%) displayed a ‘classic’ measles dermatological picture, although all had been clinically diagnosed and admitted as complicated measles cases. Of those serologically confirmed to have measles (N=38), 26.3% (95% CI 11.6 - 40.9%) conformed to the ‘classic’ dermatological picture. Therefore, a significant majority of these patients presented with what was considered in this study to be a ‘non-classic’ dermatological picture.Conclusions. Measles infection in a paediatric population requiring admission may frequently present without a full-house ‘classic’ dermatological picture. Recognised signs in isolation may be of greater value than the classically described syndrome as a whole. ‘Non-classic’ dermatological forms may occur more frequently than anticipated in complicated cases needing admission. Skin necrosis may be associated with measles. S Afr Med J 2012;102(6):356-359
Pharmaceutical research in paediatric populations and the new EU Paediatric Legislation: an industry perspective  [cached]
Auby Philippe
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1753-2000-2-38
Abstract: A large proportion of medicines used in children are prescribed off-label, and children have often been denied access to new or innovative medications. Because such situation is unethical, the need to obtain paediatric information for medicines used in children seems nowadays a matter of consensus on a global basis. Based on this, it was clear in EU, like what has happened in the US, that there was a need for a legal obligation for Pharmaceutical Companies to perform studies. This new European Paediatric Regulation that entered into force in 2007 opens a new era of European drug regulatory history and will offer a major opportunity to improve children's health through advancements in research by providing a new framework for evaluating the efficacy and safety of medicines for children. But, paediatric development remains challenging and the hurdles of conducting research in paediatric population are numerous. The article presents the new European Paediatric Regulation, illustrates its rationale through paediatric psychopharmacology, and discusses some of its consequences on paediatric research from an industry perspective. Recommendations for further international collaboration are also suggested to make global paediatric development plans.
What′s new in urticaria ?  [cached]
Ghosh Sanjay
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2009,
Abstract: Urticaria, a perplexing disease of ever-changing explanations, is being renovated almost everyday by newer facts and findings accumulated from different parts of the globe. Cost of the urticaria treatment gradually grows higher and higher whereas the ailment disturbs the quality of life very adversely. Disorder of coagulation cascade has recently thrown some new light into its mechanism. Non-allergic angioedema induced by bradykinin caused by genetic defects and ACE-inhibitors has also been noted. Role of H. pylori in the pathogenesis of urticaria has also been re-reviewed. Urticaria could sometimes mimic erythema multiforme and is termed urticaria multiforme. Skin biopsy showed features of vasculitis in good number of urticaria irrespective of clinical features. Contact sensitization showed positive results in certain cases thus proving contact urticaria. Topical clobetasol, systemic omalizumab and NB UVB have shown promising results in certain forms of urticaria.
What's new in azithromycin?
Anthony Solomon,Matthew Burton
Community Eye Health Journal , 2004,
Abstract: Antibiotics in trachoma control Trachoma is caused by repeated ocular infection with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. It is, therefore, logical that anti-chlamydial antibiotics have become a key component of the SAFE strategy. Tetracycline is an effective anti-chlamydial agent. However, because of its effect on growing teeth, oral tetracycline is not recommended for children less than 12 years of age, or for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Tetracycline eye ointment is safer than oral tetracycline, but is difficult and unpleasant to apply: if treatment is unsupervised, compliance for a full six-week course is thought to be poor. Fortunately, during the 1990s, it was shown that ocular C. trachomatis infections can successfully be cleared with a single oral dose of the antibiotic azithromycin,1 and that treatment of whole communities is practical, acceptable to the community, effective,2 and results in a low incidence of adverse reactions.3 An operational comparison suggested that directly-observed singledose azithromycin is more effective at achieving clinical cure of active trachoma than six weeks unsupervised tetracycline ointment.4 The main limitation to the use of azithromycin for trachoma control is its cost, which is high if the drug is not donated.
What’s new in paediatrics? (Review)
D Wittenberg
Continuing Medical Education , 2009,
Abstract: Benjamin Osler is reputed to have stated that he knew that 50% of what he was teaching his students was going to be proven wrong; the only problem was he did not know which 50%!
What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?
Ginsberg,Ann M.;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2002, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862002000600014
Abstract: over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (tb) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. the renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although bcg is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the expanded programme on immunization, mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of tb and over 2 million deaths annually. over one hundred tb vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary tb disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of m. tuberculosis. the most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years.
What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?  [cached]
Ginsberg Ann M.
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2002,
Abstract: Over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. The renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although BCG is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of TB and over 2 million deaths annually. Over one hundred TB vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. Candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary TB disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. The most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years.
What's new in trachoma control?
Jacob Kumaresan
Community Eye Health Journal , 2004,
Abstract: Progress towards elimination of blinding trachoma Ten years after the Community Eye Health Journal first devoted an entire issue to trachoma (Vol. 7, Issue 14), and five years since its last trachoma-focused edition (Vol. 12, Issue 32), this debilitating disease continues to remain the world s leading cause of infectious blindness. The good news is that its elimination is now closer in sight due to recent health advances and developments to control the problem.
What’s new in glaucoma treatment?
Richard Wormald
Community Eye Health Journal , 2006,
Abstract: Glaucoma treatment: the state of the evidenceInterventions for the treatment of different forms of glaucoma have been tried and tested for many years. The idea that lowering the pressure might be helpful was first proposed more than a hundred years ago. By the 1950s, it was established that raised intraocular pressure (IOP) was glaucoma, and vice versa. However, in the mid 1960s, Fred Hollows and Peter Graham demolished that simple concept by revealing that there were many people in the population with raised IOP but no glaucoma, and people with glaucoma without raised IOP.1 Nevertheless, IOP remains an important risk factor (and the only one we can modify) for a group of conditions characterised by a progressive atrophy of the optic nerve associated with typical structural and functional abnormalities.Only quite recently has robust evidence emerged regarding the effectiveness of treatment for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). There is still uncertainty about the best way to manage chronic angle closure. This discussion focuses only on the primary glaucomas in adults, open-angle and acute, and chronic angle closure.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.