oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
The Use of Distraction Osteogenesis for treatment of the mandibular deformity in hemi facial microsomia: A case report of the double osteotomy technique  [cached]
Krishna R,Kumar S,Singh A,Bhatnagar S
Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery , 2001,
Abstract: A patient presenting with hemi facial microsomia with Grade IIB mandibular deformity was treated by distraction osteogenesis after double osteotomy of the ramus and the body. A satisfactory facial symmetry was achieved following the surgery without any complications.
Bilateral facial palsy associated with leptospirosis
Silva, Andressa Alves da;Ducroquet, Marcelo;Pedrozo Junior, Jeff Chandler;
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-86702009000400017
Abstract: leptospirosis is a zoonosis of worldwide occurrence caused by the spirochete leptospira interrogans. it is an acute feverish disease with a broad clinical spectrum and follows a characteristic biphasic course. bilateral facial palsy is a rare clinical condition and the differential diagnosis of its causes is extensive. the objective of this exploratory study, presented as a case report, is to describe the occurrence of bilateral facial palsy as an unusual manifestation of leptospirosis. this suggestion should not be overlooked when analyzing the causes for bilateral facial palsy, and should be considered with other possible differential diagnoses, some of which are potentially fatal.
Bilateral Isolated Facial Paralysis Due to Lyme Disease  [PDF]
Ismet Murat Melek,Task n Duman,Turali Eraslan
Journal of Biological Sciences , 2005,
Abstract: Lyme disease, a tick-borne infection caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is a multisystem disease most commonly affecting the skin, joints, nervous system, or heart. Acute neurologic abnormalities occur in 15 to 20% of the patients and neuropathy, particularly facial paralysis, lymphocytic meningitis and motor and sensory radiculoneuritis are the most common manifestations. However, facial paralysis is an objective manifestation of acute neuroborreliosis as it occurs during the early disseminated phase of the infection. The incidence of facial paralysis was reported as 4.5% but isolated facial paralysis with out other clinical manifestations such as headache, neck pain, stiff neck or throat pain due to borreliosis is extremely rare A previously healthy 46-year-old male developed bilateral facial nerve paralysis. The neurological examination was normal except the bilateral facial nerve palsy. Serological investigation of CSF and serum revealed positive Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Ig M and Ig G antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens. An antibiotic regimen consisting of ceftriaxone 2 g/day for six weeks was initiated. The patient was fully recovered at the end of first month with full regression of serological and CSF laboratory findings. In this current case, we report a patient with sole bilateral facial nerve paralysis due to Lyme disease.
Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Diagnostic Dilemma  [PDF]
Sohil Pothiawala,Fatimah Lateef
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/458371
Abstract: Introduction. Bilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a rare condition, representing less than 2% of all cases of FNP. Majority of these patients have underlying medical conditions, ranging from neurologic, infectious, neoplastic, traumatic, or metabolic disorders. Objective. The differential diagnosis of its causes is extensive and hence can present as a diagnostic challenge. Emergency physicians should be aware of these various diagnostic possibilities, some of which are potentially fatal. Case Report. We report a case of a 43-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with sequential bilateral facial nerve paralysis which could not be attributed to any particular etiology and, hence, presented a diagnostic dilemma. Conclusion. We reinforce the importance of considering the range of differential diagnosis in all cases presenting with bilateral FNP. These patients warrant admission and prompt laboratory and radiological investigation for evaluation of the underlying cause and specific further management as relevant. 1. Introduction Unilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP), with an incidence of around 25 per 100,000 population, is a common neurologic disorder mimicking a stroke. It often leads to emergency department visits. Bell’s palsy, also known as idiopathic facial paralysis, is the most common cause of unilateral facial paralysis, accounting for approximately 70% of these cases [1]. Bilateral FNP is exceedingly rare, representing less than 2% of all the facial palsy cases, and has an incidence of 1 per 5,000,000 population [2, 3]. Majority of these patients have serious underlying medical conditions and need to be admitted for evaluation of the underlying cause and further management. Bell’s palsy accounts for only 23% of bilateral facial paralysis [1]. We report a case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our department with sequential bilateral facial paralysis, in which unilateral FNP was followed by contralateral FNP in the next 2 days before complete resolution of symptoms on the side affected first. We also discuss her evaluation and the possible differential diagnoses. As few cases have been reported, the literature review serves as an important point of discussion for bilateral facial palsy. 2. Case Report A 43-year-old lady with no previous medical illness presented to the emergency department with complaints of perioral numbness, altered tongue sensation, speech difficulty, and facial droop as noted by her husband since that morning. She was able to mobilize well with no peripheral limb weakness. She had been complaining of
Porphyria with predominantly involvement of bilateral facial nerves  [cached]
Yesim YETIMALAR,Tulay KURT,Nevin GURGOR,Elif OZDEMIR
Journal of Neurological Sciences , 2006,
Abstract: Porphyria is an uncommon disease caused by the deficient activity of a heme biosynthetic enzyme, which presents clinically with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing porphyria in a case with the predominant bilateral facial paralysis without clearly disclosing other already known neurological manifestations.
Sarcoidosis: A Cause For Bilateral Facial Palsy  [cached]
Kadir KOTIL,Bekir KILINC
Journal of Neurological Sciences , 2005,
Abstract: Sarcoidosis is a systemic, chronic, granulomatous disease and it mainly affects lung. Bilateral facial nerve involvoment due to occult sarcoidosis is an extremely rare phenomenon that can be the presenting complaint in a wide spectrum of the disease.Case report. A 38 year-old man presented to our clinic with facial diplegia. His general, neurologic (except facial diplegia), ocular examination and laboratory tests were normal. There was no respiratory system symptom. Chest X-ray revealed bilateral hilar and paratracheal lymphadenopathy without atelectesia. In sarcoidosis, definitive diagnosis was made by bronco-alveoalar leavage. Corticosteroid therapy was not applied, because, he had have stage I sarcoidosis. First left sided and later right sided facial palsy detoriated and almost recovered in 7 weeks from admission. The abnormalities seen on chest x-ray resolved slowly over this period. He has been followed up in our out-patient clinic without any medication after discharge and no recurrent sign or symptoms have appeared so far.This paper describes a spesific unique case of occult facial diplegia occuring in a patient having stage I occult sarcoidosis. We believe, this phenomenon proved that facial diplegia can be created by the infiltration just only the seventh cranial nerves and the most important point to be stressed in this phenomenon should be the investigation of sarcoidosis among the facial diplegic cases
Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Diagnostic Dilemma
Sohil Pothiawala,Fatimah Lateef
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/458371
Abstract: Introduction. Bilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a rare condition, representing less than 2% of all cases of FNP. Majority of these patients have underlying medical conditions, ranging from neurologic, infectious, neoplastic, traumatic, or metabolic disorders. Objective. The differential diagnosis of its causes is extensive and hence can present as a diagnostic challenge. Emergency physicians should be aware of these various diagnostic possibilities, some of which are potentially fatal. Case Report. We report a case of a 43-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with sequential bilateral facial nerve paralysis which could not be attributed to any particular etiology and, hence, presented a diagnostic dilemma. Conclusion. We reinforce the importance of considering the range of differential diagnosis in all cases presenting with bilateral FNP. These patients warrant admission and prompt laboratory and radiological investigation for evaluation of the underlying cause and specific further management as relevant.
Experience with fascia lata graft for Micro-Vascular Decompression for Trigeminal neuralgia and Hemi-facial spasm
Shajehan S,Fazal Gafoor PA,Krishna Kiran,Usha R
Calicut Medical Journal , 2004,
Abstract: The efficacy of Micro-Vascular Decompression (MVD) as a treatment modality for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Hemi-facial spasm and other cranial nerve compression syndromes of the posterior cranial fossa is well established. Various types of implants have been used during MVD to keep the offending vessel away from the nerve. We have used fascia lata in a series of 10 patients who underwent MVD over a period of 2 years. Graft related complications like aseptic meningitis, slipping of the graft with resultant recurrence of neuralgia etc., were not encountered in these patients. All patients had excellent relief of symptoms. The vascular anomalies encountered, the procedure, the results and the advantages of using fascia lata as graft are discussed.
Bilateral transverse facial cleft as an isolated deformity: Case report
Akinmoladun V,Owotade F,Afolabi A
Annals of African Medicine , 2007,
Abstract: Transverse facial clefts are rare deformities, these mostly occur as part of syndromes such as facial dysostosis and branchial arch syndrome. This is a report of a case of isolated, asyndromic bilateral facial cleft seen at a semi-urban specialist hospital. Congenital facial defects remain sources of mental and social stress to the families. Infanticide, perhaps a thing of the past in the developed world may still be practiced in cases of congenital deformities in the developing countries, hence the need for early involvement of social workers and clinical psychologist in management.
Immunomodulatory Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Swine Hemi-Facial Allotransplantation Model  [PDF]
Yur-Ren Kuo, Chien-Chang Chen, Shigeru Goto, Yu-Ting Huang, Chun-Ting Wang, Chia-Chun Tsai, Chao-Long Chen
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035459
Abstract: Background In this study, we investigated whether the infusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), combined with transient immunosuppressant treatment, could suppress allograft rejection and modulate T-cell regulation in a swine orthotopic hemi-facial composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA) model. Methodology/Principal Findings Outbred miniature swine underwent hemi-facial allotransplantation (day 0). Group-I (n = 5) consisted of untreated control animals. Group-II (n = 3) animals received MSCs alone (given on days ?1, +1, +3, +7, +14, and +21). Group-III (n = 3) animals received CsA (days 0 to +28). Group-IV (n = 5) animals received CsA (days 0 to +28) and MSCs (days ?1, +1, +3, +7, +14, and +21). The transplanted face tissue was observed daily for signs of rejection. Biopsies of donor tissues and recipient blood sample were obtained at specified predetermined times (per 2 weeks post-transplant) or at the time of clinically evident rejection. Our results indicated that the MSC-CsA group had significantly prolonged allograft survival compared to the other groups (P<0.001). Histological examination of the MSC-CsA group displayed the lowest degree of rejection in alloskin and lymphoid gland tissues. TNF-α expression in circulating blood revealed significant suppression in the MSC and MSC-CsA treatment groups, as compared to that in controls. IHC staining showed CD45 and IL-6 expression were significantly decreased in MSC-CsA treatment groups compared to controls. The number of CD4+/CD25+ regulatory T-cells and IL-10 expressions in the circulating blood significantly increased in the MSC-CsA group compared to the other groups. IHC staining of alloskin tissue biopsies revealed a significant increase in the numbers of foxp3+T-cells and TGF-β1 positive cells in the MSC-CsA group compared to the other groups. Conclusions These results demonstrate that MSCs significantly prolong hemifacial CTA survival. Our data indicate the MSCs did not only suppress inflammation and acute rejection of CTA, but also modulate T-cell regulation and related cytokines expression.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.