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Adult Onset Epidermal Verrucous Nevus and Angiokeratoma: An Unusual Coexistence  [cached]
Rajesh Sinha,Pallavi Sharma,Hari Shankar Pandey
Journal of Case Reports , 2012,
Abstract: Verrucous epidermal nevi are characterized by localized or diffuse, brown or gray-brown verrucous papules which may coalesce to form well-demarcated papillomatous plaques. Various lesions like squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, may arise on epidermal nevus but association with vascular lesion is rare except in epidermal nevus syndromes and proteus syndrome. We report a case of adult onset epidermal verrucous nevus associated with clinical and histopathological features of angiokeratoma
Vulvar and Perianal Condyloma Superimposed Inflammatory Linear Verrucous Epidermal Nevus: A Case Report and Review of the Literature  [PDF]
Sümeyra Nerg?z Avcio?lu,Sündüz ?zlem Altinkaya,Mert Kü?ük,Hasan Yüksel,Selda Demircan-Sezer,Gonca U?ar
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/261574
Abstract: Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus (ILVEN) is a benign cutaneous hamartoma characterized by intensely erythematous, pruritic, and inflammatory papules that occur as linear bands along the lines of Blaschko. There is a considerable clinical and histological resemblance between ILVEN and linear psoriasis, lichen striatus, linear lichen planus, and invasion of epidermal nevus by psoriasis. The pathogenesis of ILVEN is unknown. It is regarded as a genetic dyskeratotic disease reflecting genetic mosaicism. Here, a case of vulvar and perianal condyloma superimposed ILVEN is presented. 1. Introduction Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus (ILVEN) is a relatively uncommon benign cutaneous hamartoma described by Altman and Mehregan in 1971 [1]. It is characterized by intensely pruritic, erythematous, inflammatory papules coalescing into well-demarcated verrucous plaques in a linear distribution. Patients seek help for its symptoms and cosmetic appearance [2]. Medical management is extremely variable but unfortunately does not result in complete recovery. On the other hand, surgical excision of lesions is not preferable due to extensive scarring and relapse of disease [3]. Here,a case of vulvar and perianal condyloma superimposed ILVEN is presented. 2. Case Presentation A 21-year-old virgo patient, has presented with a huge amount of vulvar and perianal condylomas. Surgical excision was planned. But in physical examination of patient, erythematous scaly plaques were seen unilaterally on the right side of body. Detailed medical history revealed that, erythematous lesions, of linear or grouped distribution, involving only right side of body; upper trunk, axilla, and lower extremity unilaterally had existed since a few years after birth. Lesions were extremely pruriginous and aggravated with heat. There were no pathological antecedents or previous family history of the disease. Dermatological examination revealed papular lesions and erythematous plaques with areas of scaling and crusts, linearly distributed at the right side of the body. (Figures 1(a), 1(b), and 1(c)). Disease was diagnosed as ILVEN by histopathological examination. Besides, laboratory tests including C3, C4, immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IGM, IGE, IGG anti-HAV IGM, and anti-HAV IGG were performed. Laboratory investigations showed mild anemia (hemoglobin 10.5?g/dL), an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (45?mm/h), and an elevated C-reactive protein level (36.3?mg/L, normal < 8.0?mg/L). Liver enzymes, renal function test results, and immunoglobulin levels were normal. Results of tests
A Metastasizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Solitary Epidermal Nevus  [PDF]
Masami Toya,Yuichiro Endo,Akihiro Fujisawa,Miki Tanioka,Yoshiaki Yoshikawa,Takao Tachibana,Yoshiki Miyachi
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/109632
Abstract: Aim. Secondary tumor rarely develops from epidermal nevus. We present a case of a metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma that developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. Case Report. An 82-years old Japanese female was presented with a red tumor on the left axilla. She reported that the tumor developed in a congenital epidermal nevus. A biopsy of the tumor showed that a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arose from the epidermal nevus. As a lymph node metastasis was found by sentinel lymph node biopsy, the patient received surgical excision of the lesion, axillary lymph node dissection, and postoperative radiation. Discussion. Secondary tumors developing in epidermal nevus are rare. To the best of our knowledge, only in two cases including the present case, SCC developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. There is no established clinical guideline for prophylactic removal of epidermal nevus. However, a biopsy should be done if a secondary malignancy is suspected in an epidermal nevus. 1. Introduction The presence of secondary tumors in various types of congenital nevi is well known; however, malignancy associated with epidermal nevi is rare. Here, we present a case of a metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma that developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. 2. Case Report An 82-year-old Japanese female presented with a red tumor on the left axilla. She reported that the tumor developed in a verrucous plaque that had existed since birth. The size of the tumor was 25?mm in diameter, and the plaque was 45 × 40?mm (Figure 1(a)). A biopsy of the tumor showed that it was a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Surgical excision of the tumor and a sentinel lymph node biopsy of the right axilla were performed. Pathological examination showed that the SCC had invaded the subcutaneous fat tissue. The SCC developed within a papillomatous epidermal lesion showing hyperkeratosis and acanthosis (Figures 1(b) and 1(c)). The sentinel lymph node was positive for tumor cell; therefore, the patient underwent a subsequent axillary lymph node dissection and 60 Gray of postoperative radiation. Seven out of 30 excisional lymph nodes were positive for tumor cells. A computed tomography scan detected no metastasis to internal organs. We diagnosed the tumor as pT2N2bM0, stage IV (UICC 7th edn.). The patient was tumor-free for a year after the axillary lymph node dissection. Figure 1: (a) A red tumor on the left axilla developed in a congenital verrucous plaque. (b) SCC lesion (left side of the vertical bar) developed within the epidermal nevus (hematoxyline-eosin
Nevo epidérmico inflamatorio lineal (NEVIL): Presentación en la edad adulta Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus (ILVEN): Late onset disease  [cached]
E J Carbó Amoroso,M G Díaz,M V Guardati,M A Reyes
Revista Argentina de Dermatología , 2008,
Abstract: El NEVIL es la variedad inflamatoria del nevo epidérmico; es un tumor benigno hamartomatoso, que se distribuye siguiendo las líneas de Blaschko. Estas líneas representarían mosaicismos cutáneos del desarrollo embriológico. El NEVIL suele aparecer en la infancia. Son generalmente unilaterales y en ocasiones muy pruriginosos. El diagnóstico diferencial es frecuentemente dificultoso. Presentamos una paciente en la cual la manifestación de esta patología se produce en forma tardía, siendo esto poco frecuente. El tratamiento es un desafío, se han probado múltiples modalidades terapéuticas, con resultados en ocasiones desalentadores. La cirugía, puede utilizarse en lesiones de peque o tama o. Los tratamientos con luz láser podrían ser de utilidad. The ILVEN is the inflammatory variety of epidermal nevi, benign hamartomatous tumor that distributed following Blaschko lines. These lines represent cutaneous mosaicism in embryologic development. The ILVEN usually appear in the infancy. Generally unilateral and occasionally is very pruriginous. The differential diagnosis is often difficult. We present a patient in which the manifestation of her disease is produced in late onset, being this infrequent. Management is a challenge, multiple therapeutic modalities have been tested, with discouraging results. Surgery can be utilized in small size lesions. Laser therapy could be of utility.
Basal cell carcinoma developing in verrucous epidermal nevus  [cached]
De Dipankar,Kanwar Amrinder,Radotra Bishan
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2007,
Abstract:
Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus and spinal anomaly  [cached]
Madnani N,Misra B
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1999,
Abstract:
Verrucous epidermal naevus associated with woolly hair naeves  [cached]
Manzoor Shaikh,Mir Naseer,Qayoom Seema
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2003,
Abstract: An unusual case of verrucous epidermal naevus associated with wooily hair noevus of the scalp is being reported.
Patient with giant Becker’s nevus and epidermal nevus  [cached]
George Issa,Travis W. Blalock,Jack L. Lesher
Dermatology Reports , 2011, DOI: 10.4081/dr.2011.e23
Abstract: Becker’s nevus is a cutaneous hamartoma that may be present at birth, but more commonly is noticed during puberty. It classically manifests unilaterally on the shoulder and upper trunk as a tan to brown patch or thin plaque. "It typically has an irregular margin, breaks up into islands at the periphery, and has an average size of 125 square centimeters. Numerous skin, soft-tissue, and bony anomalies have been reported in association with Becker’s nevus. We describe a patient with Becker’s nevus of considerable size who has a concurrent epidermal nevus.
Linear epidermolytic acanthoma or adult-onset verrucous epidermal nevus?  [cached]
Ramam M
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2010,
Abstract:
A Metastasizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Solitary Epidermal Nevus
Masami Toya,Yuichiro Endo,Akihiro Fujisawa,Miki Tanioka,Yoshiaki Yoshikawa,Takao Tachibana,Yoshiki Miyachi
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/109632
Abstract: Aim. Secondary tumor rarely develops from epidermal nevus. We present a case of a metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma that developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. Case Report. An 82-years old Japanese female was presented with a red tumor on the left axilla. She reported that the tumor developed in a congenital epidermal nevus. A biopsy of the tumor showed that a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arose from the epidermal nevus. As a lymph node metastasis was found by sentinel lymph node biopsy, the patient received surgical excision of the lesion, axillary lymph node dissection, and postoperative radiation. Discussion. Secondary tumors developing in epidermal nevus are rare. To the best of our knowledge, only in two cases including the present case, SCC developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. There is no established clinical guideline for prophylactic removal of epidermal nevus. However, a biopsy should be done if a secondary malignancy is suspected in an epidermal nevus.
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