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AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE LITERACY LEVELS OF STUDENTS
YE WANG,CHONGMIN LEE,PETER V. PAUL
L1 Educational Studies in Language and Literature , 2010,
Abstract: This paper presents a synthesis of the research findings of the literacy levels and difficulties of deaf/hardof hearing children and adolescents in the United States, China, and South Korea. After discussing generalachievement levels, we provide a brief introduction to the nature of the three writing systems (English,Chinese, and Korean) to establish an explanatory framework that accounts for the status of the currentliteracy levels. We assert that the three writing systems are designed, at the least, to fit the phonologicalstructures of the languages for which they represent. We also argue that there is a reciprocal, facilitativerelationship between lower-level (e.g., decoding) and higher-level (e.g., comprehension, composing)skills. To establish this reciprocity, children need to develop competence in phonology, specifically,and in other general language components (e.g., morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics) ofthe language of print. Many children may also need to learn how to comprehend or compose (e.g., develophigher level metacognitive, inferencing skills).
USER EDUCATION AND COMPUTER LITERACY,MULTIMEDIA LITERACY,NETWORK LITERACY
用户教育与计算机、多媒体、网络文化

Wang Ruihua,
王瑞华

现代图书情报技术 , 1996,
Abstract: This article has introduced the concept of computer literacy,multim edia literacy and network literacy and their relationship with the traditional l iteracy.It has also pointed out that it′s a new role for library and information institute to educate user of information in computer literacy,multimedia literacy,network literacy.
Promoting knowledge of statins in patients with low health literacy using an audio booklet
Gossey JT, Whitney SN, Crouch MA, Jibaja-Weiss ML, Zhang H, Volk RJ
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S19995
Abstract: omoting knowledge of statins in patients with low health literacy using an audio booklet Original Research (2628) Total Article Views Authors: Gossey JT, Whitney SN, Crouch MA, Jibaja-Weiss ML, Zhang H, Volk RJ Published Date August 2011 Volume 2011:5 Pages 397 - 403 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S19995 J Travis Gossey1, Simon N Whitney2, Michael A Crouch3, Maria L Jibaja-Weiss2, Hong Zhang4, Robert J Volk4 1Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program, Sugar Land, TX, USA; 4Department of General Internal Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Houston Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics, Houston, TX, USA Background: Statins are generally well tolerated and effective at reducing a patient’s risk of both primary and secondary cardiovascular events. Many patients who would benefit from statin therapy either do not adhere to or stop taking their statin medication within the first year. We developed an audio booklet targeted to low health literacy patients to teach them about the benefits and risks of statins to help the patients adhere to their statin therapy. Methods: Through focus groups and an iterative design, an audio booklet was developed for both English-speaking and Spanish-speaking patients. We then compared the booklet with standard of care in 132 patients from our target patient population to measure its impact on knowledge and understanding of statins. Results: The patients enjoyed the audio booklet and showed significant increases in knowledge after listening to it when compared with those who received the standard of care materials. Conclusion: The audio booklet shows promise as a tool that can be used effectively in clinical practice to teach patients about statin therapy.
Promoting knowledge of statins in patients with low health literacy using an audio booklet  [cached]
Gossey JT,Whitney SN,Crouch MA,Jibaja-Weiss ML
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2011,
Abstract: J Travis Gossey1, Simon N Whitney2, Michael A Crouch3, Maria L Jibaja-Weiss2, Hong Zhang4, Robert J Volk41Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program, Sugar Land, TX, USA; 4Department of General Internal Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Houston Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics, Houston, TX, USABackground: Statins are generally well tolerated and effective at reducing a patient’s risk of both primary and secondary cardiovascular events. Many patients who would benefit from statin therapy either do not adhere to or stop taking their statin medication within the first year. We developed an audio booklet targeted to low health literacy patients to teach them about the benefits and risks of statins to help the patients adhere to their statin therapy.Methods: Through focus groups and an iterative design, an audio booklet was developed for both English-speaking and Spanish-speaking patients. We then compared the booklet with standard of care in 132 patients from our target patient population to measure its impact on knowledge and understanding of statins.Results: The patients enjoyed the audio booklet and showed significant increases in knowledge after listening to it when compared with those who received the standard of care materials.Conclusion: The audio booklet shows promise as a tool that can be used effectively in clinical practice to teach patients about statin therapy.Keywords: patient adherence, patient education, medical decision-making, hypercholesterolemia
A Balanced Literacy Initiative for One Suburban School District in the United States  [PDF]
Donita Shaw,Karen Hurst
Education Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/609271
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate how the teachers employed by this suburban USA school district implemented balanced literacy instruction. The 111 teachers who taught grades K-6 completed surveys and were observed. Quantitative data from the surveys and observations were analyzed through descriptive statistics, nonparametric chi-square tests, and Pearson correlations. One open-ended survey question was analyzed qualitatively. Findings show that the majority of teachers had an acceptable understanding of balanced literacy. There were differences among teachers’ instruction on literacy components and structures across grades. Weak correlations among self-reported and observed practices were found. Implications are discussed as the data are being used for research-informed improvements in the district. 1. Introduction Balanced literacy is a term associated with a variety of perspectives [1]. Some view balanced literacy to be a combination of whole language and skills-based instruction [2]. Others view balanced literacy as an understanding that reading and writing develop mutually [3]. A third perspective has shown that balanced literacy is a way to provide different levels of teacher support and child control [4]. Even though “balanced literacy” may be an evasive concept without a definitive consensus among literacy researchers, all can agree it is a balance of elements. For the purposes of this paper, our balanced literacy definition mirrors that of New York City’s Department of Education’s research-based approach called The Comprehensive Approach to Balanced Literacy [5]. Balanced Literacy stresses the essential dimensions of reading through explicit teaching of phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency and expressiveness, vocabulary, and comprehension. Daily read-alouds, independent reading time, reading workshop, writing workshop, and systematic word study instruction are key features of the approach. Teachers demonstrate the habits and strategies of effective reading and writing through a variety of structures: read-aloud, guided reading, shared reading, interactive writing, and minilessons in reading and writing. By coaching students in individual or small-group conferences, teachers allow students to successfully and independently apply those strategies to their own reading and writing. The goal of one Midwestern United States school district is to make literacy accessible to all students by expanding teachers’ knowledge and participation in balanced literacy instruction. The district believes balanced literacy instruction is important
DigEuLit: concepts and tools for digital literacy development
Allan Martin,Jan Grudziecki
ITALICS , 2006,
Abstract: In the e-permeated society, a society also increasingly unpredictable and uncertain, “digital literacy” becomes not only a key factor in enabling participation in education, as well as employment and other aspects of social life, but also a means of gaining some understanding of the world. The DigEuLit project, funded by the EC eLearning Initiative, has a task of defining digital literacy and developing a framework and tools for digital literacy development in European educational settings. We have observed converging literacies which have gained new relevance in digital environments, and proposed a definition of digital literacy which focuses on the processes of using digital tools to support the achievement of goals in the individual’s life-situation. A suite of online tools is being developed to enable digital literacy progress to be tracked by teachers and learners, and evolution of these tools will continue beyond the life of the project.
Understanding Cultural and Linguistic Barriers to Health Literacy
Kate Singleton,Elizabeth M.S. Krause
Online Journal of Issues in Nursing , 2009,
Abstract: Nurses today are providing care, education, and case management to an increasingly diverse patient population that is challenged with a triad of cultural, linguistic, and health literacy barriers. For these patients, culture and language set the context for the acquisition and application of health literacy skills. Yet the nursing literature offers minimal help in integrating cultural and linguistic considerations into nursing efforts to address patient health literacy. Nurses are in an ideal position to facilitate the interconnections between patient culture, language, and health literacy in order to improve health outcomes for culturally diverse patients. In this article the authors begin by describing key terms that serve as background for the ensuing discussion explaining how culture and language need to be considered in any interaction designed to address health literacy for culturally diverse patients. The authors then discuss the interrelationships between health literacy, culture, and language. Next relevant cultural constructs are introduced as additional background. This is followed by a description of how literacy skills are affected by culture and language, a note about culturally diverse, native-born patients, and a presentation of case examples illustrating how culture and language barriers are seen in patients’ healthcare experiences. The authors conclude by offering recommendations for promoting health literacy in the presence of cultural and language barriers and noting the need for nursing interventions that fully integrate health literacy, culture, and language.
A Balanced Literacy Initiative for One Suburban School District in the United States  [PDF]
Donita Shaw,Karen Hurst
Education Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/609271
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate how the teachers employed by this suburban USA school district implemented balanced literacy instruction. The 111 teachers who taught grades K-6 completed surveys and were observed. Quantitative data from the surveys and observations were analyzed through descriptive statistics, nonparametric chi-square tests, and Pearson correlations. One open-ended survey question was analyzed qualitatively. Findings show that the majority of teachers had an acceptable understanding of balanced literacy. There were differences among teachers’ instruction on literacy components and structures across grades. Weak correlations among self-reported and observed practices were found. Implications are discussed as the data are being used for research-informed improvements in the district.
Understanding critical health literacy: a concept analysis
Susie Sykes, Jane Wills, Gillian Rowlands, Keith Popple
BMC Public Health , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-150
Abstract: The study uses a theoretical and colloquial evolutionary concept analysis method to systematically identify the features associated with this concept. A unique characteristic of this method is that it practically combines an analysis of the literature with in depth interviews undertaken with practitioners and policy makers who have an interest in the field. The study also analyses how the concept is understood across the contexts of time, place, discipline and use by health professionals, policy makers and academics.Findings revealed a distinct set of characteristics of advanced personal skills, health knowledge, information skills, effective interaction between service providers and users, informed decision making and empowerment including political action as key features of critical health literacy. The potential consequences of critical health literacy identified are in improving health outcomes, creating more effective use of health services and reducing inequalities in health thus demonstrating the relevance of this concept to public health and health promotion.While critical health literacy is shown to be a unique concept, there remain significant contextual variations in understanding particularly between academics, practitioners and policy makers. Key attributes presented as part of this concept when it was first introduced in the literature, particularly those around empowerment, social and political action and the existence of the concept at both an individual and population level, have been lost in more recent representations. This has resulted in critical health literacy becoming restricted to a higher order cognitive individual skill rather than a driver for political and social change. The paper argues that in order to retain the uniqueness and usefulness of the concept in practice efforts should be made to avoid this dilution of meaning.
The Contemporary Understanding of User Experience in Practice  [PDF]
Stefan Hellweger,Xiaofeng Wang,Pekka Abrahamsson
Computer Science , 2015,
Abstract: User Experience (UX) has been a buzzword in agile literature in recent years. However, often UX remains as a vague concept and it may be hard to understand the very nature of it in the context of agile software development. This paper explores the multifaceted UX literature, emphasizes the multi-dimensional nature of the concept and organizes the current state-of-the-art knowledge. As a starting point to better understand the contemporary meaning of UX assigned by practitioners, we selected four UX blogs and performed an analysis using a framework derived from the literature review. The preliminary results show that the practitioners more often focus on interaction between product and user and view UX from design perspective predominantly. While the economical perspective receives little attention in literature, it is evident in practitioners writings. Our study opens up a promising line of request of the contemporary meaning of UX in practice.
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