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Urethral and vaginal infections, age of patients and state of the pelvic floor in the aetiology of the irritative symptoms of the lower urinary tract in women
Vecchioli Scaldazza,Carlo; Morosetti,Carolina;
Archivos Espa?oles de Urología (Ed. impresa) , 2006, DOI: 10.4321/S0004-06142006000500020
Abstract: objectives: the aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of a) urethral and/or vaginal infections caused by common germs or mycoplasmas, chlamydia, candida; b) age of patients; c) pelvic floor disorders in the development of irritative urinary symptoms in women. methods: 77 consecutive abacteriuric symptomatic female patients were compared with 55 asymptomatic women. a detailed micturition history and a genitourinary physical examination were performed. urine samples as well as vaginal and urethral swabs were taken for cultures. results: no statistical difference was found between the two groups regarding both urethral and/or vaginal infections and pelvic floor disorders. whereas a significant statistical difference was found in the age of the patients. in the symptomatic group the women were older than in the asymptomatic group. conclusions: the results of this study confirm that ageing is a very important cause in the development of the lower urinary tract symptoms in women.
Urinary Tract Infections in Children  [cached]
Mustafa Taskesen,Aysun Karabay Bayazit
Arsiv Kaynak Tarama Dergisi , 2009,
Abstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000): 57-69]
Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people  [cached]
Beveridge L,Davey PG,Phillips G,McMurdo MET
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2011,
Abstract: Louise A Beveridge1, Peter G Davey2, Gabby Phillips3, Marion ET McMurdo11Ageing and Health, Division of Medical Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, 2Health Informatics Centre, University of Dundee, 3Medical Microbiology Department, NHS TaysideAbstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.Keywords: urinary tract infection, elderly, review
Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people
Beveridge L, Davey PG, Phillips G, McMurdo MET
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S13423
Abstract: imal management of urinary tract infections in older people Review (12223) Total Article Views Authors: Beveridge L, Davey PG, Phillips G, McMurdo MET Published Date June 2011 Volume 2011:6 Pages 173 - 180 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S13423 Louise A Beveridge1, Peter G Davey2, Gabby Phillips3, Marion ET McMurdo1 1Ageing and Health, Division of Medical Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, 2Health Informatics Centre, University of Dundee, 3Medical Microbiology Department, NHS Tayside Abstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.
Hypercalciuria in children with urinary tract symptoms  [cached]
Fallahzadeh M,Fallahzadeh M,Mowla A,Derakhshan A
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2010,
Abstract: We performed this prospective study to determine the urinary calcium to creatinine ratio (Ca/Cr) in children with different urinary symptoms. We studied 523 children in our neph-rology clinic with an age range of 3 to 14 years (mean= 8) and male to female ratio of 0.61. All the children had at least one of the urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, frequency, urgency, abdo-minal and/or flank pain, diurnal incontinence or enuresis), microscopic hematuria, urinary tract infection or urolithiasis. Fasting urine was collected for measuring calcium and creatinine and the results were compared to the values for the normal Iranian children. Ca/Cr ratio of more than 0.2 (mg/mg) was considered as hypercalciuria. Of all the patients, 166 (31.3%) were hypercalciuric. Urine Ca/Cr ratio was significantly higher in all the subgroups with one or more of the urinary symptoms (P< 0.001). We conclude that urine Ca/Cr ratio is significantly increased in children with all types of urinary symptoms. We recommend measuring urinary calcium in all children with urinary tract symptoms, especially if unexplained.
URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN PREGNANCY
KY Loh,N Sivalingam
Malaysian Family Physician , 2007,
Abstract: Urinary tract infections frequently affect pregnant mothers. This problem causes significant morbidity and healthcare expenditure. Three common clinical manifestations of UTIs in pregnancy are: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli remains the most frequent organism isolated in UTIs. All pregnant mothers should be screened for UTIs in pregnancy and antibiotics should be commenced without delay. Urine culture and sensitivity is the gold standard in diagnosing UTIs. Without treatment, asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is associated with preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia and anaemia. Acute pyelonephritis can lead to maternal sepsis. Recurrent UTIs in pregnancy require prophylactic antibiotic treatment.
Common errors in diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections: Microbiological aspects  [PDF]
Boji?-Mili?evi? Gordana,Mikov Momir,Dautovi? Radomir
Medicinski Pregled , 2005, DOI: 10.2298/mpns0508380b
Abstract: Introduction Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common infectious diseases affecting all age groups, from infants to the elderly. The majority of these infections occur in otherwise healthy individuals who present with symptoms of acute uncomplicated bacterial cystitis or pyelonephritis. Certain patient populations with complicated conditions are at increased risk for acquiring infection or failing therapy. Forty to 50% of adult women have a history of at least one urinary tract infection. Diagnosis and classification of UTI Although there are general guidelines concerning diagnosis and classification of urinary tract infections, there are wide variations in clinical practice. There are both errors which are frequently committed and mysteries that are still unsolved. Active management is important because under some circumstances urinary tract infections may cause permanent renal scarring. Imaging procedures are a cornerstone for critical evaluation of urinary tract infections, but avoidance of investigative routines will allow a marked saving in terms of costs and in terms of unnecessary radiation and psychological stress to the patient.
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections due to Asymptomatic Colonic Diverticulitis
Evangelos Falidas,Georgios Anyfantakis,Stavros Boutzouvis,Michail Kyriakopoulos,Stavros Mathioulakis,Konstantinos Vlachos,Constantinos Villias
Case Reports in Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/934168
Abstract: Colovesical fistula is a common complication of diverticulitis. Pneumaturia, fecaluria, urinary tract infections, abdominal pain, and dysuria are commonly reported. The authors report a case of colovesical fistula due to asymptomatic diverticulitis, and they emphasize the importance of deeply investigate recurrent urinary tract infection without any bowel symptoms. They also briefly review the literature.
Urodynamic study in children with recurrent urinary tract infections
Madani A.,Pournasiri Z,Kajbafzadeh A.M.,Attaee N
Tehran University Medical Journal , 2007,
Abstract: Background: Impairment in the function of the lower urinary tract can be the cause of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) and vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) in children. The purpose of our research was to evaluate the frequency of occurrence of bladder instability in children with UTI.Methods: The research involved 133 children (11 boys, 122 girls), ranging in age from seven months to 14 years. Group A consisted of 78 children with a history of recurrent UTI, while Group B included 55 children with recurrent UTI and VUR. Urodynamic tests (cystometry) were performed on all the children.Results: Abnormal functioning of the lower urinary tract was found in 98 children (73.1%) from Group A and 41 children (78.8%) from Group B. The most common dysfunction was detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD), which was found in 54% of all subjects, 46.2% of patients in Group A and 60% of patients in Group B (p<0.05). Unstable bladder was found in 42 (33%) children with no significant difference between the two groups. In 17 children (12.6%) DSD was accompanied by bladder instability. In both groups about 20% of the children did not present with symptoms indicative of urination dysfunction, where as 80% reported various symptoms, of which the most common were constipation and urinary urgency. In half of the children from Group A and one-fourth of the children from Group B there were several co-occurring symptoms: frequency, urgency, intermittent voiding, incontinence, dribbling and retention, and constipation.Conclusions: The most common disturbance of lower urinary tract function in these children with recurrent UTI was DSD, which occurred more often in children with VUR.
Herbs In Treatment Of Urinary Tract Infections
Manish Wasamwar,Vijay S.Wadha,Gopal S. Gond
Indian Streams Research Journal , 2012,
Abstract: It is known that urinary tract is very common source of infection and UTIs are second most common reason people visit their doctors each year. Escherichia coli is responsible for large majority of UTIs. UTIs is most commonly diagnosed bacterial infection in woman. Population at risk of complication include older woman, pregnant woman. Continuous antibiotics prophylaxis are used to treat and prevent recurrent urinary tract infections, frequent antibiotic use can result in vaginal and intestinal dysbiosis as well as antibiotic resistance. Thus, it is desirable to seek alternative methods of prevention and treatment of simple UTIs. Few herbal antimicrobial agents Vaccinium macrocarpon (Cranberry), Vaccinium myrtillus (Bilberry; Blueberry), Berberine, Arctostaphylos uva ursi (Bearberry) are proved to be very effective in preventing and treating urinary tract infections.
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