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Aphaereta ceratitivora sp. n. (Hymenoptera, Braconidae), a new parasitoid of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera, Tephritidae) from the Azores  [cached]
Cees van Achterberg,Tania Teixeira,LuIsa Oliveira
ZooKeys , 2012, DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.222.3618
Abstract: A new gregarious larval-pupal endoparasitoid of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is described and illustrated: Aphaereta ceratitivora sp. n. (Braconidae: Alysiinae: Alysiini).
Conditional embryonic lethality to improve the sterile insect technique in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)
Marc F Schetelig, Carlos Caceres, Antigone Zacharopoulou, Gerald Franz, Ernst A Wimmer
BMC Biology , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1741-7007-7-4
Abstract: Here, we present a first alternative reproductive sterility system for medfly based on transgenic embryonic lethality. This system is dependent on newly isolated medfly promoter/enhancer elements of cellularization-specifically-expressed genes. These elements act differently in expression strength and their ability to drive lethal effector gene activation. Moreover, position effects strongly influence the efficiency of the system. Out of 60 combinations of driver and effector construct integrations, several lines resulted in larval and pupal lethality with one line showing complete embryonic lethality. This line was highly competitive to wildtype medfly in laboratory and field cage tests.The high competitiveness of the transgenic lines and the achieved 100% embryonic lethality causing reproductive sterility without the need of irradiation can improve the efficacy of operational medfly SIT programs.The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae), is one of the most devastating and economically important insect pests [1]. An effective biological and environment-friendly control of this pest is the sterile insect technique (SIT) [2]. The SIT reduces a pest population by mass release of reproductively sterile male insects into a wildtype (WT) population of the same species. This leads to the decrease of progeny by competition of sterilized males with WT males for WT females [3]. Thus, the sterilization of the pest species in SIT programs is of major importance and is commonly induced by radiation. However, the sterility and competitiveness are indirectly correlated [4]. In some programs therefore lower doses of radiation are used to generate lines which are more competitive even though only partially sterile. In preventional release programs, completely sterile flies are released into pest-free areas to avoid the establishment of invasive fruit flies and to control the constant problem of re-infestation [5]. These programs have
Simulation of Temperature Effect on the Population Dynamic of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly Ceratitis capitata (Diptera; Tephritidae)  [PDF]
S. El messoussi,H. Hafid,A. Lahrouni,M. Afif
Journal of Agronomy , 2007,
Abstract: Effects of the temperature on immature stage developmental times of the medfly Ceratitis capitata (Diptera; Tephritidae) were used to study the dynamics of population with FRUFLY model. To test the model in the field, flight activity was studied using para-pheromone traps. The FRUFLY model simulations agree with experimental data results of the insect collected by para-pheromone traps and predicts the appearance of the various generations of adults with time FRUFLY simulation modelling is an important tool for identifying insect pest population's size and can help to determine the urgency of action and evaluating options for management.
Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis  [PDF]
César Monzó, Alberto Urbaneja, Miguel Ximénez-Embún, Julia García-Fernández, José Luis García, Pedro Casta?era
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051440
Abstract: Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators.
Influence of different tropical fruits on biological and behavioral aspects of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera, Tephritidae)
Costa, Anne M.;Amorim, Francismare de O.;Anjos-Duarte, Cyntia S.;Joachim-Bravo, Iara S.;
Revista Brasileira de Entomologia , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0085-56262011005000039
Abstract: influence of different tropical fruits on biological and behavioral aspects of the mediterranean fruit fly ceratitis capitata (wiedemann) (diptera, tephritidae). studies on ceratitis capitata, a world fruit pest, can aid the implementation of control programs by determining the plants with higher vulnerability to attacks and plants able to sustain their population in areas of fly distribution. the objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of eight tropical fruits on the following biological and behavioral parameters of c. capitata: emergence percentage, life cycle duration, adult size, egg production, longevity, fecundity, egg viability, and oviposition acceptance. the fruits tested were: acerola (malpighia glabra l.), cashew (anacardium occidentale l.), star fruit (averrhoa carambola l.), guava (psidium guajava l.), soursop (annona muricata l.), yellow mombin (spondias mombin l.), malay apple (syzygium malaccense l.), and umbu (spondias tuberosa l.). the biological parameters were obtained by rearing the recently hatched larvae on each of the fruit kinds. acceptance of fruits for oviposition experiment was assessed using no-choice tests, as couples were exposed to two pieces of the same fruit. the best performances were obtained with guava, soursop, and star fruit. larvae reared on cashew and acerola fruits had regular performances. no adults emerged from yellow mombin, malay apple, or umbu. fruit species did not affect adult longevity, female fecundity, or egg viability. guava, soursop, and acerola were preferred for oviposition, followed by star fruit, malay apple, cashew, and yellow mombin. oviposition did not occur on umbu. in general, fruits with better larval development were also more accepted for oviposition.
Predation of Fruit Fly Larvae Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) by Ants in Grove  [PDF]
W. D. Fernandes,M. V. Sant'Ana,J. Raizer,D. Lange
Psyche , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/108389
Abstract: Based on evidence that ants are population regulatory agents, we examined their efficiency in predation of fruit fly larvae Anastrepha Schiner, 1868 (Diptera: Tephritidae). Hence, we considered the differences among species of fruit trees, the degree of soil compaction, and the content of soil moisture as variables that would explain predation by ants because these variables affect burying time of larvae. We carried out the experiment in an orchard containing various fruit bearing trees, of which the guava (Psidium guajava Linn.), jaboticaba (Myrciaria jaboticaba (Vell.) Berg.), and mango trees (Mangifera indica Linn.) were chosen for observations of Anastrepha. We offered live Anastrepha larvae on soil beneath the tree crowns. We observed for 10?min whether ants removed the larvae or the larvae buried themselves. Eight ant species were responsible for removing 1/4 of the larvae offered. The Pheidole Westwood, 1839 ants were the most efficient genus, removing 93% of the larvae. In compacted and dry soils, the rate of predation by ants was greater. Therefore, this study showed that ants, along with specific soil characteristics, may be important regulators of fruit fly populations and contribute to natural pest control in orchards. 1. Introduction The fruit fly Anastrepha spp., together with some rarer Rhagoletis Loew, 1862, and Ceratitis capitata (Wiedeman, 1824) (Tephritidae), cause damage to fruit crops in Brazil. Tephritids directly damage the fruit, because the orifice made to lay the eggs causes the fruit to rot and fall prematurely, and the larvae feeding destroy the fruit pulp [1]. Ants, a group of efficient insect predators that regulate populations of general insects [2–8], can be considered as agents of biological pest control in agroecosystems [9–11]. The predation by ants on fruit flies occurs when the larvae leave the fruit in order to bury themselves in the soil and transform into pupae. Solenopsis geminata (Fabricius, 1804) ants, for example, were responsible for predation of 95% of the Anastrepha ludens (Loew, 1873) larvae during the warm months in Mexico [7]. In Guatemala, these ants attacked 21.6% of the C. capitata larvae in orange groves and 9.3% in coffee plantations [8]. Predation is strongly and indirectly influenced by the physical properties of the soil, because the larvae took longer in burying themselves in very dry soil, increasing the time in which they remained exposed and consequently the rate of ant predation [12]. In this study, we analyzed which factors were present and how they influenced the predation of fruit flies
Oviposition preference and larval performance in Ceratitis capitata (Díptera, Tephritidae)
Joachim-Bravo, Iara Sordi;Zucoloto, Fernando Sérgio;
Revista Brasileira de Zoologia , 1997, DOI: 10.1590/S0101-81751997000400004
Abstract: experiments concerning oviposition preference were carried out on ceratitis capitata to determine whether females are able to preferentially oviposit on natural hosts in which the larvae develop better. the results indicated that the females do not preferentially oviposit on hosts of better nutritive value for the larvae.
Capacidad dispersiva de Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) entre valles agrícolas en San Juan, Argentina Dispersal behavior of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) among agricultural valleys in San Juan, Argentina  [cached]
Leonardo M. Díaz,Fernando A. Murúa,Juan. C. Acosta,Jorge M. Escobar
Revista de la Sociedad Entomol?3gica Argentina , 2008,
Abstract: Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), díptero tefrítido cosmopolita originario del norte de áfrica, es la principal plaga de los frutales en muchos países de América. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer las características de la capacidad de dispersión de Ceratitis capitata, mediante la liberación de moscas estériles en condiciones de campo, con el propósito de predecir las posibles invasiones de valles agrícolas vecinos. Se liberaron 54.000 moscas estériles marcadas de ambos sexos, en localidades del valle de Tulum, cercanas a los ingresos de los valles de Ullum y Zonda. Para el monitoreo del vuelo dispersivo se instalaron trampas Jackson y Mc Phail. Se capturaron 1.213 adultos durante el periodo de muestreo. No hubo propagación de los adultos liberados desde el valle de Tulum a los valles de Ullum y Zonda. La presencia de hospederos, posición geográfica de cada Quebrada y la orientación respecto al viento predominante, podrían explicar la diferencia de difusión entre ambas Quebradas. La dispersión duró cinco semanas. La distancia media de los adultos liberados fue de 3.764 m (S= 2.897 m) sin encontrar diferencias entre ambos sexos. Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) is a cosmopolitan Tephritids dipteran native to the north of Africa, which is the main plague of fruit trees in many countries of the American continent. Here we assess the dispersion capacity of the Ceratitis capitata, by releasing sterile flies under field conditions, in order to predict possible invasion to agricultural valleys nearby. 54,000 marked sterile flies of both sexes were released in locations of the Tulum Valley, close to the access to the Ullum and Zonda valleys. Jackson & Mc Phail traps were set up for monitoring the dispersion flights. 1,213 adults were captured during the sampling period, and there was no dispersion of the released adults from the Tulum valley to the Ullum and Zonda valleys. Host presence, geographical position of each ravine and wind orientation could explain the dispersion difference betwen both ravines. The dispersion lasted five weeks and the average dispersion distance reached by the released adults was of 3,764 m (S= 2897 m). No differences between sexes were detected.
Capacidad dispersiva de Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) entre valles agrícolas en San Juan, Argentina
Díaz,Leonardo M.; Murúa,Fernando A.; Acosta,Juan. C.; Escobar,Jorge M.;
Revista de la Sociedad Entomol?3gica Argentina , 2008,
Abstract: ceratitis capitata (wiedemann) is a cosmopolitan tephritids dipteran native to the north of africa, which is the main plague of fruit trees in many countries of the american continent. here we assess the dispersion capacity of the ceratitis capitata, by releasing sterile flies under field conditions, in order to predict possible invasion to agricultural valleys nearby. 54,000 marked sterile flies of both sexes were released in locations of the tulum valley, close to the access to the ullum and zonda valleys. jackson & mc phail traps were set up for monitoring the dispersion flights. 1,213 adults were captured during the sampling period, and there was no dispersion of the released adults from the tulum valley to the ullum and zonda valleys. host presence, geographical position of each ravine and wind orientation could explain the dispersion difference betwen both ravines. the dispersion lasted five weeks and the average dispersion distance reached by the released adults was of 3,764 m (s= 2897 m). no differences between sexes were detected.
Sexual behavior of mutant strains of the medfly Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)
R.D Brice?o
Revista de Biología Tropical , 2003,
Abstract: Males of the mutant strains (blind, vestigal-winged) of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratits capitata (Wiedmann) showed differences in behavior compared with control (mass-reared) males. Mutant males made fewer mating attempts and achieved fewer matings than control males. Vestigal-winged females copulated less frequently with both mutants. Blind males climbed rather than jumped onto females and copulated in very low numbers compared with control and vestigal males. Blind females copulated normally with control, males and in very low numbers with both types of mutant males Machos mutantes (ciegos, alas vestigiales) de la mosca del mediterráneo Ceratitis capitata (Wiedmann) mostraron diferencias en conducta comparados con los machos testigo (cría masiva). Los machos mutantes, realizaron menos intentos por aparearse y lograron menos apareamientos que los machos testigo. Las hembras con alas vestigiales, copularon menos con ambas clases de mutantes. Los machos ciegos, subieron en lugar de saltar sobre las hembras y copularon en números muy bajos comparados con los machos testigo y con los de alas vestigiales. Las hembras ciegas, copularon de forma normal con los machos testigo y en números muy bajos con ambos tipos de machos mutantes
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