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Public Histories of Australian and British Women's Suffrage: Some Comparative Issues  [cached]
Hilda Kean
Public History Review , 2007,
Abstract: In this article I consider the ways in which activists in the British suffrage movement became the public historians of their own pasts. I analyse the different forms in which the history of suffrage feminism was created and the ways in which it both drew upon former traditions of the labour movement and conventions of public memorialisation. I consider the ways in which the Australian suffrage campaign has been memorialised and differences between this and the British position. I raise a number of questions about ways in which public historians might explore the creation of collective histories and the role of individuals within that process arising from this initial comparative analysis.
Cities within Cities: Australian and New Zealand Art in the Twentieth Century  [PDF]
Rex Butler,A D S Donaldson
Journal of Art Historiography , 2011,
Abstract: This paper argues for a new conception of both Australian and New Zealand art history based on their long-standing historical connection. The national histories of the art of both countries that dominated the 20th century are revealed as themselves historical, preceded and followed by non-national histories that are in effect part of a wider history of world art. The paper makes its case by looking at a number of artists whose careers cross between the two countries and at the expatriates from both countries who worked together in Europe.
Some Recent Developments in the Decoherent Histories Approach to Quantum Theory  [PDF]
J. J. Halliwell
Physics , 2003, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-40968-7_5
Abstract: A brief introduction to the decoherent histories approach to quantum theory is given, with emphasis on its role in the discussion of the emergence of classicality from quantum theory. Some applications are discussed, including quantum-classical couplings, the relationship of the histories approach to quantum state diffusion, and the application of the histories approach to situations involving time in a non-trivial way.
Other Histories: Photography and Australia’  [PDF]
Helen Ennis
Journal of Art Historiography , 2011,
Abstract: This paper deals with Australian photographys historiography in published survey histories. It argues that photography has a doubled history, represented in broader histories of Australian art and its own medium specific histories. It considers photographys treatment in recent histories of Australian art by Christopher Allen (1997), Andrew Sayers (2001) and John McDonald (2008). The four survey histories of photography published to date – by Jack Cato (1955), Gael Newton (1988), Anne Marie-Willis (1988) and Helen Ennis (2007) – are discussed in relation to the different methodologies used. The inter-relationship between local and international developments in historiography is considered and recent paradigmatic shifts in writing on photography are identified. They include the emergence of a pluralized notion of photography, interdisciplinary approaches and concerns with narrative and materiality. Finally, it is argued that a new kind of historiography has emerged, evident in histories that are purposefully fractional.
Recent increase in aerosol loading over the Australian arid zone
R. M. Mitchell, S. K. Campbell,Y. Qin
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) & Discussions (ACPD) , 2010,
Abstract: Collocated sun photometer and nephelometer measurements at Tinga Tingana in the Australian Outback over the decade 1997–2007 show a significant increase in aerosol loading following the onset of severe drought conditions in 2002. This increase is confined to the season of dust activity, particularly September to March. In contrast, background aerosol levels during May, June and July remained stable. The enhanced aerosol loadings during the latter 5 years of the study period can be understood as a combination of dune destabilisation through loss of ephemeral vegetation and surface crust, and the changing supply of fluvial sediments to ephemeral lakes and floodplains within the Lake Eyre Basin. Major dust outbreaks are generally highly localised, although significant dust activity was observed at Tinga Tingana on 50% of days when a major event occurred elsewhere in the Lake Eyre Basin, suggesting frequent basin-wide dust mobilisation. Combined analysis of aerosol optical depth and scattering coefficient shows weak correlation between the surface and column aerosol (R2=0.24). The aerosol scale height is broadly distributed with a mode typically between 2–3 km, with clearly defined seasonal variation. Climatological analysis reveals bimodal structure in the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth, with a summer peak related to maximal dust activity, and a spring peak related to lofted fine-mode aerosol. There is evidence for an increase in near-surface aerosol during the period 2003–2007 relative to 1997–2002, consistent with an increase in dust activity. This accords with an independent finding of increasing aerosol loading over the Australian region as a whole, suggesting that rising dust activity over the Lake Eyre Basin may be a significant contributor to changes in the aerosol budget of the continent.
Recent increase in aerosol loading over the Australian arid zone  [PDF]
R. M. Mitchell,S. K. Campbell,Y. Qin
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions , 2009,
Abstract: Collocated sun photometer and nephelometer measurements at Tinga Tingana in the Australian Outback over the decade 1997–2007 show a significant increase in aerosol loading following the onset of severe drought conditions in 2002. The mean mid-visible scattering coefficient obtained from nephelometer measurements over the period 2003–2007 is approximately double that recorded over the preceding 5 yr, with consistent trends in the column aerosol optical depth derived from the sun photometer. This increase is confined to the season of dust activity, particularly September to March. In contrast, background aerosol levels during May, June and July remained stable. The enhanced aerosol loadings during the latter 5 yr of the study period can be understood as a combination of dune destabilisation through loss of ephemeral vegetation and surface crust, and the changing supply of fluvial sediments to ephemeral lakes and floodplains within the Lake Eyre Basin. Major dust outbreaks are generally highly localised, although significant dust activity was observed at Tinga Tingana on 50% of days when a major event occurred elsewhere in the Lake Eyre Basin, suggesting frequent basin-wide dust mobilisation. Combined analysis of aerosol optical depth and scattering coefficient shows weak correlation between the surface and column aerosol (R2=0.24). The aerosol scale height is broadly distributed with a mode typically between 2–3 km, with clearly defined seasonal variation. Climatological analysis reveals bimodal structure in the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth, with a summer peak related to maximal dust activity, and a spring peak related to lofted fine-mode aerosol. There is evidence for an increase in near-surface aerosol during the period 2003–2007 relative to 1997–2002, consistent with an increase in dust activity. This accords with an independent finding of increasing aerosol loading over the Australian region as a whole, suggesting that rising dust activity over the Lake Eyre Basin may be a significant contributor to changes in the aerosol budget of the continent.
The Australian National Seismograph Network  [cached]
D. Jepsen
Annals of Geophysics , 1994, DOI: 10.4401/ag-4192
Abstract: The Australian Seismological Centre of the Australian Geological Survey Organisation, operates and co-operates a national seismograph network consisting of 24 analogue and 8 digitally telemetred (3 broadband) stations (see fig. 1 and table 1). The network covers the Australian continent and the Australian Antarctic Territory.
Imagined Transcultural Histories and Geographies  [cached]
Bronwyn Winter
PORTAL : Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies , 2012,
Abstract: In a globalised world, an assumption prevails that the nation has somehow lost its power to regulate our lives, being undermined by other forces, either top-down through the impact of global capitalism or bottom-up through migrations, transnational religious, ethnic or social movement communities or other transversal politics. A related idea is that ‘culture’ is now irrevocably hybridised and border-zoned, that we no longer live in a world of discrete, located, identifiable and historically grounded cultures but in some unstable and for-the-moment insterstitiality, a sort of cultural interlanguage that sits outside well-mapped structures of power. Yet, just as the nation and the boundaries it sets around culture are being conceptually chased from our maps of the world, they come galloping back to reassert themselves. They do so politically, economically, legally, symbolically. Amidst all the noise of our transnationalisms, hybridities and interstitialities, the idea of what it is to be ‘Australian’ or ‘French’ or ‘Filipino’ or ‘Asian’ reaffirms itself, in mental geographies and constructed histories, as our ‘imagined community’ (to use Benedict Anderson’s famous term [Anderson 1983]), or indeed, ‘imagined Other’, even if it is an imagined ‘Other’ that we would somehow wish to incorporate into our newly hybridised Self. Using the notion of transcultural mappings, the articles in this special issue investigate this apparent paradox. They look at how the Self and Other have been mapped through imagined links between geography, history and cultural location. They interrogate the tension between the persistence of mappings of the world based on discrete national or cultural identities on one hand, and, on the other hand, the push to move beyond these carefully guarded borders and problematise precise notions of identity and belonging.
Bohmian Histories and Decoherent Histories  [PDF]
James B. Hartle
Physics , 2002, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.69.042111
Abstract: The predictions of the Bohmian and the decoherent (or consistent) histories formulations of the quantum mechanics of a closed system are compared for histories -- sequences of alternatives at a series of times. For certain kinds of histories, Bohmian mechanics and decoherent histories may both be formulated in the same mathematical framework within which they can be compared. In that framework, Bohmian mechanics and decoherent histories represent a given history by different operators. Their predictions for the probabilities of histories therefore generally differ. However, in an idealized model of measurement, the predictions of Bohmian mechanics and decoherent histories coincide for the probabilities of records of measurement outcomes. The formulations are thus difficult to distinguish experimentally. They may differ in their accounts of the past history of the universe in quantum cosmology.
Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage in the Pacific: a Brief Report on Recent Progress at the Australian Museum
Leslie Christidis,Vinod Daniel,Paul Monaghan
International Journal of Intangible Heritage , 2008,
Abstract: This paper reports on an intangible cultural heritage forumheld at the Australian Museum, Sydney, in 2007. Forumparticipants, including representatives from Fiji, Guam,New Zealand, Norfolk Island, Palau, Samoa, Tonga,Vanuatu, and Yap as well as members of Sydney’s heritagecommunity, contributed to a debate on the question of whatthe UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of theIntangible Cultural Heritage 2003 means in practical terms to Pacific countries and how the Australian Museum might work in partnership with them in their safeguarding efforts.Importantly, the forum allowed the interests of traditional knowledge holders to be considered and for a number of concerns to be noted. These concerns are also of significance for those working more broadly in the field of intangible cultural heritage and are reported below.
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