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The Politics of Imagining and Forgetting in Chinese Ethnic Minorities' Museums  [cached]
Marzia Varutti
Outlines : Critical Practice Studies , 2010,
Abstract: Through an exploration of the representation of ethnic minorities in the museums of Kunming, Yunnan Province of China, this article discusses the active role that museums play in the processes of memory and identity engineering, whereby museum images and narratives are used to support collective imagination about ethnic minorities' identities and past. Drawing from a comparative analysis of museum displays in Kunming, I discuss how the image of ethnic minorities is conveyed through a selective process of i) remembering and emphasizing specific cultural elements, ii) forgetting other elements, and lastly, iii) modifying the perception of ethnic minorities relation to the Han majority. By revealing the extent and modalities through which museum representations manipulate ethnic minorities' identities in China, the analysis aims to contribute to our understanding of the multiple ways in which museums act as sites for the enactment of collective memory and imagination.
The management of cultural adjustment: Central-South-East European ethnic minorities in the USA  [PDF]
Mihaela ARSENE
Economia : Seria Management , 2010,
Abstract: The paper focuses on one particular instance in the management of change as accomplished/implemented in the USA by the ethnic minorities originally from Italy, Greece and Romania. The author presents a diachronic survey of the literature against the author’s own findings. The paper identifies common patterns in the cultural adjustment of all three ethnic groups surveyed and analyses them against the specific developmental pressures in each group. Historic, economic and sociological data contribute to outlining the distinct profile of each ethnic groups under investigation, as well as the assimilation patterns at work throughout its evolution in the new US cultural environment.
Appreciative semiotic and hermeneutic practices in the analysis of ethnic minorities  [PDF]
Antonio SANDU
Revista de Cercetare ?i Interven?ie Social? , 2010,
Abstract: Socio-cultural research of ethnic minorities, is a hermeneutical process involving simultaneously the analysis of discursive strategies available to communities (ethnic),and the meta-narrative material. The type of discourse research dominant in the community, produces changes in the social pragmatics of that community. Action research study presents the discursive strategy of socio-cultural action. It emphasizes on quality characteristics of the method, which can be interpreted as a semiotic analysis of communication practices in the community, with effects in changing behavior patterns. Community development resulting from changes to the rhetoric used by the community. Understood in the manner proposed by Gergen constructionism, community is the space where there is a process of constant renegotiation of the meaning of social reality. A specific way of social pragmatics which can be used in transforming the social rhetoric of ethnic and multi-ethnic communities is the appreciative inquiry, transformative method aimed at harnessing the resources within the community by exploring the discourse level of positive experiences.
Are Racial and Ethnic Minorities Less Willing to Participate in Health Research?  [PDF]
David Wendler ,Raynard Kington,Jennifer Madans,Gretchen Van Wye,Heidi Christ-Schmidt,Laura A Pratt,Otis W Brawley,Cary P Gross,Ezekiel Emanuel
PLOS Medicine , 2006, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0030019
Abstract: Background It is widely claimed that racial and ethnic minorities, especially in the US, are less willing than non-minority individuals to participate in health research. Yet, there is a paucity of empirical data to substantiate this claim. Methods and Findings We performed a comprehensive literature search to identify all published health research studies that report consent rates by race or ethnicity. We found 20 health research studies that reported consent rates by race or ethnicity. These 20 studies reported the enrollment decisions of over 70,000 individuals for a broad range of research, from interviews to drug treatment to surgical trials. Eighteen of the twenty studies were single-site studies conducted exclusively in the US or multi-site studies where the majority of sites (i.e., at least 2/3) were in the US. Of the remaining two studies, the Concorde study was conducted at 74 sites in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and France, while the Delta study was conducted at 152 sites in Europe and 23 sites in Australia and New Zealand. For the three interview or non-intervention studies, African-Americans had a nonsignificantly lower overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (82.2% versus 83.5%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–1.02). For these same three studies, Hispanics had a nonsignificantly higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (86.1% versus 83.5%; OR = 1.37; 95% CI 0.94–1.98). For the ten clinical intervention studies, African-Americans' overall consent rate was nonsignificantly higher than that of non-Hispanic whites (45.3% versus 41.8%; OR = 1.06; 95% CI 0.78–1.45). For these same ten studies, Hispanics had a statistically significant higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (55.9% versus 41.8%; OR = 1.33; 95% CI 1.08–1.65). For the seven surgery trials, which report all minority groups together, minorities as a group had a nonsignificantly higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (65.8% versus 47.8%; OR = 1.26; 95% CI 0.89–1.77). Given the preponderance of US sites, the vast majority of these individuals from minority groups were African-Americans or Hispanics from the US. Conclusions We found very small differences in the willingness of minorities, most of whom were African-Americans and Hispanics in the US, to participate in health research compared to non-Hispanic whites. These findings, based on the research enrollment decisions of over 70,000 individuals, the vast majority from the US, suggest that racial and ethnic minorities in the US are as willing as non-Hispanic
Are Racial and Ethnic Minorities Less Willing to Participate in Health Research?  [cached]
Wendler,Kington,Madans,Wye
PLOS Medicine , 2005,
Abstract: BACKGROUND: It is widely claimed that racial and ethnic minorities, especially in the US, are less willing than non-minority individuals to participate in health research. Yet, there is a paucity of empirical data to substantiate this claim. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a comprehensive literature search to identify all published health research studies that report consent rates by race or ethnicity. We found 20 health research studies that reported consent rates by race or ethnicity. These 20 studies reported the enrollment decisions of over 70,000 individuals for a broad range of research, from interviews to drug treatment to surgical trials. Eighteen of the twenty studies were single-site studies conducted exclusively in the US or multi-site studies where the majority of sites (i.e., at least 2/3) were in the US. Of the remaining two studies, the Concorde study was conducted at 74 sites in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and France, while the Delta study was conducted at 152 sites in Europe and 23 sites in Australia and New Zealand. For the three interview or non-intervention studies, African-Americans had a nonsignificantly lower overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (82.2% versus 83.5%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-1.02). For these same three studies, Hispanics had a nonsignificantly higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (86.1% versus 83.5%; OR = 1.37; 95% CI 0.94-1.98). For the ten clinical intervention studies, African-Americans' overall consent rate was nonsignificantly higher than that of non-Hispanic whites (45.3% versus 41.8%; OR = 1.06; 95% CI 0.78-1.45). For these same ten studies, Hispanics had a statistically significant higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (55.9% versus 41.8%; OR = 1.33; 95% CI 1.08-1.65). For the seven surgery trials, which report all minority groups together, minorities as a group had a nonsignificantly higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (65.8% versus 47.8%; OR = 1.26; 95% CI 0.89-1.77). Given the preponderance of US sites, the vast majority of these individuals from minority groups were African-Americans or Hispanics from the US. CONCLUSIONS: We found very small differences in the willingness of minorities, most of whom were African-Americans and Hispanics in the US, to participate in health research compared to non-Hispanic whites. These findings, based on the research enrollment decisions of over 70,000 individuals, the vast majority from the US, suggest that racial and ethnic minorities in the US are as willing as non-Hispanic w
The Improvement of Foreign Language Teachers’ Affective Variables in Universities for Ethnic Minorities  [cached]
Kun Li
English Language Teaching , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/elt.v5n12p70
Abstract: This paper states the current situation of foreign language teachers’ affective variables in universities for ethnic minorities when teaching a foreign language. It emphasizes the urgent need of improvement of affective variables in such universities based on relevant research results and an interview performed in a university for ethnic minorities. Its purpose is to arouse people’s attention on teachers’ quality development, especially teachers’ affective variables. Several methods are mentioned to help teachers build a harmonious atmosphere in the classroom and improve teachers’ quality and future language teaching.
Genetic Relationships of Ethnic Minorities in Southwest China Revealed by Microsatellite Markers  [PDF]
Hongbin Lin,Hao Fan,Feng Zhang,Xiaoqin Huang,Keqin Lin,Lei Shi,Songnian Hu,Jiayou Chu,Duen-Mei Wang
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009895
Abstract: Population migrations in Southwest and South China have played an important role in the formation of East Asian populations and led to a high degree of cultural diversity among ethnic minorities living in these areas. To explore the genetic relationships of these ethnic minorities, we systematically surveyed the variation of 10 autosomal STR markers of 1,538 individuals from 30 populations of 25 ethnic minorities, of which the majority were chosen from Southwest China, especially Yunnan Province. With genotyped data of the markers, we constructed phylogenies of these populations with both DA and DC measures and performed a principal component analysis, as well as a clustering analysis by structure. Results showed that we successfully recovered the genetic structure of analyzed populations formed by historical migrations. Aggregation patterns of these populations accord well with their linguistic affiliations, suggesting that deciphering of genetic relationships does in fact offer clues for study of ethnic differentiation.
Modes of Minorities’ Integration: Explaining Historical, Economic and Political Factors  [PDF]
Andrada COSTOIU
Journal of Identity and Migration Studies , 2008,
Abstract: There are a great number of states in which different ethnic minorities coexist, each of them having their own culture, language and history. In some of these states, the ethnic minorities have been subjected to marginalization and acculturation, in other states the minority groups were recognized as being distinct parts of the nation and were granted equal rights of participation in the public arena. This paper attempts to explain why states opt for such different ways of integrating their minorities. It first develops a typology of minorities’ integration and than, by using the example of two nation-states that fit into each type of integration model it discusses the historical, political and economical factors that could explain each pattern of minorities’ integration.
Religions and confessions of national minorities in Serbia
?or?evi? Dragoljub B.
Sociologija , 2005, DOI: 10.2298/soc0503193d
Abstract: Setting aside the major national community, Serbs, the text analyzes the religious-confessional profile of all 28 national communities in Serbia according to the 2002 census. In the Serbian ethnic profile there are more national minorities gravitating towards Christianity rather than Islam. Among Christian national minorities, Orthodox and Roman Catholic confessions are almost equally represented, while Sunni Islam is the most prevailing confession among Muslim minorities. In describing religions and confessions of national minorities, the following concepts and phenomena are taken into consideration: "confessional identification", "violation of confessional identity", "religion of fate", "religion of choice", "syncretistic religiosity", "combinatory religiosity", "religious seekers", "religions of minorities", "minority religions", "religious communities of minorities" and "protestantization process".
Livelihood Vulnerability and Food Security among Upland Ethnic Minorities in Northern Vietnam
Christine Bonnin,Sarah Turner
Kasarinlan : Philippine Journal of Third World Studies , 2011,
Abstract: For the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, national food self-sufficiency is a core concern. The state focuses on rice production and output levels for local and overseas markets, endorsing the adoption of hybrid rice seeds through numerous development initiatives. Yet, this approach overlooks an important group of rice producers and consumers in Vietnam: highland ethnic minorities. Fluctuations in global grain demand mean little for their daily coping mechanisms and near-subsistence livelihoods, but food security is an ongoing preoccupation for their households. In this research note, we take an actor-oriented livelihood approach to examine food security among ethnic minorities—namely, Hmong and Yao—in Lào Cai province, northern Vietnam. Arguing that the everyday, subjective experiences of upland minority groups have been ignored, we examine how these groups have reacted to the introduction of hybrid seeds, their negotiations with the state over its use, and their trials and tribulations along the way.
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