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The future of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Nigeria
M Anastassia, O Fredrick, W Malcolm
Science World Journal , 2009,
Abstract: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is one of the techniques for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction. This article reviews the current status of CCS technology, highlights costs and discusses legal and regulatory issues of CCS. The main purpose of the article is to review CCS and CO2-EOR experience from ongoing projects in different parts of the world and give recommendations on how this knowledge can be applied in Nigeria. A potential demonstration CO2-EOR project in Nigeria under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is discussed.
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Nigeria: fundamental science and potential implementation risks
A Galadima, Z.N Garba
Science World Journal , 2008,
Abstract: Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is a novel global technology encompassing the isolation and transportation of CO2 from emission points followed by storage in appropriate geological formations. Although the process had been projected to play a great role in enhancing oil recovery from partly depleted oil and gas reservoirs as well as mitigating global climate change by 2030, the science, technology, and potential consequences of its application are not well understood in many African countries like Nigeria that are majorly dependent on oil and gas economy and contributing emitters of greenhouse gases. This paper described the fundamental science of CCS and addressed the potential risks of its future implementation in Nigeria. Critical analysis of the country’s oil and gas activities coupled with economic and political situation indicates that CCS project in Nigeria would be faced with challenges such as long implementation time, inefficient technology, gas leakage from geological storage, capture and storage costs and implementation decision and strategies.
Using Carbon Capture and Storage CCS Techniques in Mulla Abdulla and Taza Power Plants to Mitigate the Impact of Climate Change  [cached]
Sameer S. Mustafa,Fawzi M. Omar,Bilal A. Nasir
Energy Science and Technology , 2013, DOI: 10.3968/j.est.1923847920130501.708
Abstract: In the IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES), it was projected that the number of CO2 emission sources from the electric power and industrial sectors will increase significantly until 2050. Because fossil fuel-fired power plants are responsible for around one-third of total global CO2 emissions, they are prime candidates for the application of CO2 capture and storage techniques. The aim of this work is to mitigate the impact of climate change by reducing the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere in Mulla Abdulla and Taza power plants in Kirkuk/ Iraq using CCS techniques, and to calculate the cost of the system components.
Growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) for climate change mitigation
Jennie C. Stephens
Sustainability : Science, Practice and Policy , 2006,
Abstract: Interest in technologies associated with carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been growing rapidly in both the public and private sectors over the past five to ten years as governments, industry, and individuals grapple with how to reconcile increased energy demand with the need to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations to mitigate the risks of climate change. CCS technology involves capturing the CO2 produced during fossil-fuel combustion and storing it in underground geologic reservoirs instead of emitting it into the atmosphere. The idea of engineering the storage of carbon in a reservoir has developed from relative obscurity to an increasingly recognized approach to stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This paper (1) identifies several influential nongovernmental stakeholders and discusses their contributions to CCS and (2) describes how governmental influence through political positions, government-supported research and development, and regulations and international treaties have influenced CCS initiatives. While the relative strength of nongovernmental and governmental influences is not quantified, this treatment of the various factors contributing to the advancement of CCS technology highlights the complexity associated with integrating developments in science and engineering into sustainable practices.
Carbon Capture and Storage: A Challenging Approach for Mitigation of Global Warming  [PDF]
Hai Yu
International Journal of Clean Coal and Energy (IJCCE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ijcce.2013.23003
Abstract: Carbon Capture and Storage: A Challenging Approach for Mitigation of Global Warming
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Deployment – Can Canada Capitalize on Experience? Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Deployment – Can Canada Capitalize on Experience? Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Deployment – Can Canada Capitalize on Experience?  [cached]
Drew Thomson,Anshuman Khare
Journal of technology management & innovation , 2009,
Abstract: This paper presents an overview of Canada’s experience with carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) initiatives. While discussing various options available, the paper examines the success Canada has had with carbon capture and storage and why it is advantageous for Canada to make it part of their environmental sustainability effort. The paper also discusses the barriers and challenges in carbon capture and storage deployment. The paper ends with some speculation about how the technology can be adopted quickly if some organizations were more proactively involved with it. Carbon capture and storage has a potential to change how we reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the future. However, it has a long way to go as organizations start adopting it and unanswered questions get answered in the process. It certainly is a technology worth looking at as it can affect our future climate change initiatives. This paper presents an overview of Canada’s experience with carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) initiatives. While discussing various options available, the paper examines the success Canada has had with carbon capture and storage and why it is advantageous for Canada to make it part of their environmental sustainability effort. The paper also discusses the barriers and challenges in carbon capture and storage deployment. The paper ends with some speculation about how the technology can be adopted quickly if some organizations were more proactively involved with it. Carbon capture and storage has a potential to change how we reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the future. However, it has a long way to go as organizations start adopting it and unanswered questions get answered in the process. It certainly is a technology worth looking at as it can affect our future climate change initiatives. This paper presents an overview of Canada’s experience with carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) initiatives. While discussing various options available, the paper examines the success Canada has had with carbon capture and storage and why it is advantageous for Canada to make it part of their environmental sustainability effort. The paper also discusses the barriers and challenges in carbon capture and storage deployment. The paper ends with some speculation about how the technology can be adopted quickly if some organizations were more proactively involved with it. Carbon capture and storage has a potential to change how we reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the future. However, it has a long way to go as organizations start adopting it and unanswered questions get
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Deployment: Can Canada Capitalize on Experience?
Thomson,Drew; Khare,Anshuman;
Journal of technology management & innovation , 2008, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-27242008000200009
Abstract: this paper presents an overview of canada's experience with carbon capture & storage (ccs) initiatives. while discussing various options available, the paper examines the success canada has had with carbon capture and storage and why it is advantageous for canada to make it part of their environmental sustainability effort. the paper also discusses the barriers and challenges in carbon capture and storage deployment. the paper ends with some speculation about how the technology can be adopted quickly if some organizations were more proactively involved with it. carbon capture and storage has a potential to change how we reduce our greenhouse gas (ghg) emissions in the future. however, it has a long way to go as organizations start adopting it and unanswered questions get answered in the process. it certainly is a technology worth looking at as it can affect our future climate change initiatives.
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Deployment – Can Canada Capitalize on Experience?  [cached]
Drew Thomson,Anshuman Khare
Journal of technology management & innovation , 2008,
Abstract: This paper presents an overview of Canada’s experience with carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) initiatives. While discussing various options available, the paper examines the success Canada has had with carbon capture and storage and why it is advantageous for Canada to make it part of their environmental sustainability effort. The paper also discusses the barriers and challenges in carbon capture and storage deployment. The paper ends with some speculation about how the technology can be adopted quickly if some organizations were more proactively involved with it.Carbon capture and storage has a potential to change how we reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the future. However, it has a long way to go as organizations start adopting it and unanswered questions get answered in the process. It certainly is a technology worth looking at as it can affect our future climate change initiatives.
The Environmental and Economic Sustainability of Carbon Capture and Storage  [PDF]
Paul E. Hardisty,Mayuran Sivapalan,Peter Brooks
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2011, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph8051460
Abstract: For carbon capture and storage (CCS) to be a truly effective option in our efforts to mitigate climate change, it must be sustainable. That means that CCS must deliver consistent environmental and social benefits which exceed its costs of capital, energy and operation; it must be protective of the environment and human health over the long term; and it must be suitable for deployment on a significant scale. CCS is one of the more expensive and technically challenging carbon emissions abatement options available, and CCS must first and foremost be considered in the context of the other things that can be done to reduce emissions, as a part of an overall optimally efficient, sustainable and economic mitigation plan. This elevates the analysis beyond a simple comparison of the cost per tonne of CO 2 abated—there are inherent tradeoffs with a range of other factors (such as water, NOx, SOx, biodiversity, energy, and human health and safety, among others) which must also be considered if we are to achieve truly sustainable mitigation. The full life-cycle cost of CCS must be considered in the context of the overall social, environmental and economic benefits which it creates, and the costs associated with environmental and social risks it presents. Such analysis reveals that all CCS is not created equal. There is a wide range of technological options available which can be used in a variety of industries and applications—indeed CCS is not applicable to every industry. Stationary fossil-fuel powered energy and large scale petroleum industry operations are two examples of industries which could benefit from CCS. Capturing and geo-sequestering CO 2 entrained in natural gas can be economic and sustainable at relatively low carbon prices, and in many jurisdictions makes financial sense for operators to deploy now, if suitable secure disposal reservoirs are available close by. Retrofitting existing coal-fired power plants, however, is more expensive and technically challenging, and the economic sustainability of post-combustion capture retrofit needs to be compared on a portfolio basis to the relative overall net benefit of CCS on new-build plants, where energy efficiency can be optimised as a first step, and locations can be selected with sequestration sites in mind. Examples from the natural gas processing, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and coal-fired power generation sectors, illustrate that there is currently a wide range of financial costs for CCS, depending on how and where it is applied, but equally, environmental and social benefits of emissions reduction
Carbon Capture and Sequestration in China-An Overview
M. Sylvester
Online Journal of Earth Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: If deep reductions in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are to be achieved, the introduction of CO2 capture and storage in geological reservoirs is likely to be necessary. Several CO2 storage demonstration projects are needed in a variety of geological formations worldwide to prove the viability of CO2 capture and storage as a major option for climate change mitigation. A number of studies have been performed to identify potential worldwide opportunities for early application of CO2 sequestration. China has several low-cost CO2 sources at sites that produce NH3 from coal via gasification. These CO2 sources would potentially be economically interesting candidates for storage demonstration projects if there are suitable storage sites nearby. This study reviews the efforts that have been made in the area of geologic storage of CO2 in China and what measures the government is putting in place to contribute to the reduction in the emission of greenhouse gases.
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