oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Fosfomycin Therapy for Non-Complicated Lower Urinary Tract Infections during Pregnancy: Tanta University Experience  [PDF]
Ayman Shehata Dawood, Abdelghaffar Said Dawood, Salah Abdelmonsef Nagla, Mohamed Abdelatti El-Bakary
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OJOG) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2017.75056
Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy, compliance, safety and economic cost for Fosfomycin trometamol and Nitofurantoin in uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Background: Nitofurantoin and Fosfomycin trometamol are recommended as the first-line agents for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the latest guidelines endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID). Fosfomycin is bactericidal and inhibits bacterial cell wall biogenesis and reduces bacterial adherence to uroepithelial cells. Fosfomycin has broad antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, as Escherichia coli, Escherichia faecalis, and various Gram-negatives like Citrobacter and Proteus. Both Nitofurantoin and Fosfomycin are category B in pregnancy. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted at Tanta University Hospitals in the period from June, 1, 2015 to January, 1, 2017. Patients were recruited from outpatient clinics of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology Departments presenting with asymptomatic bacteruria or cystitis. Patients were allocated randomly into 2 groups: group I (n = 50 cases) received Fosfomycin therapy and group II (n = 50 cases) received Nitofurantoin therapy (n = 50 cases). After treatment, evaluation of patient symptoms, organism count, patient compliance and cost of treatment were done. Results: The enrolled patients were suffering from lower urinary tract infections; asymptomatic bacteruria (17 cases) or cystitis (83 cases). Ten patients were excluded. The demographic data of included patients were not significant for both groups. Complete relief (100%) of symptoms 5 days after start of treatment was noticed in Fosfomycin group while improvement of symptoms after 5 day-treatment was noticed in 86.49% in Nitofurantoin group (p-value = 0.030). The side effects were recorded in 7 cases (18.42%) in Fosfomycin group compared to (35.14%) with significant difference in the reported side effects, (p-value = 0.003). Compliance was 38/38 (100%) in Fosfomycin group compared to 34/37 (91.89%) in Nitrofuantoin group (p-value = 0.001). Resistance was very minimal in Fosfomycin group where 1/38 case (2.63%) reported resistance for treatment compared to 8/37 cases (21.62%) in Nitofurantoin group (p-value = 0.001). Conclusion: Fosfomycin trometamine proved to be safe, effective, and has limited
Urinary Tract Infections in Children  [cached]
Mustafa Taskesen,Aysun Karabay Bayazit
Arsiv Kaynak Tarama Dergisi , 2009,
Abstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000): 57-69]
Occurrence and recording of genitourinary tract infections during pregnancy
Nadia Zanon Narchi,Adriana Kurdejak
Online Brazilian Journal of Nursing , 2008,
Abstract: A quantitative descriptive research, whose objective was to verify the occurrence and recording of genitourinary tract infections in pregnant women. According to the data collected through interviews with 100 puerperae of a philanthropic maternity hospital and analyses of their prenatal care cards, 51% of the women reported having had urinary tract infection during pregnancy. Of these, only 70% reported having been treated with antibiotics and 47% having repeated urine tests after the treatment. Of the total cases of reported urinary tract infections, only 41% had been entered on the prenatal care cards, which in only 25% of the cases indicated uroculture as being the test of cure. Of the 8% of women who reported genital infections, 50% had been treated with vaginal cream. Concerning data entries, 11% of the prenatal care cards indicated genital infection and 64% of those did not report any treatment. All the data demonstrated high percentages of both failure to record data and inadequate knowledge of the women as to the actual presence of such infections, the need for treatment and the proper follow-up. It was concluded that health care professionals need to reevaluate the way they assist patients during the prenatal care period, especially regarding the women’s information and the complete recording of data on the prenatal care card.
Occurrence and recording of genitourinary tract infections during pregnancy  [cached]
Nadia Zanon Narchi,Adriana Kurdejak
Online Brazilian Journal of Nursing , 2008,
Abstract: A quantitative descriptive research, whose objective was to verify the occurrence and recording of genitourinary tract infections in pregnant women. According to the data collected through interviews with 100 puerperae of a philanthropic maternity hospital and analyses of their prenatal care cards, 51% of the women reported having had urinary tract infection during pregnancy. Of these, only 70% reported having been treated with antibiotics and 47% having repeated urine tests after the treatment. Of the total cases of reported urinary tract infections, only 41% had been entered on the prenatal care cards, which in only 25% of the cases indicated uroculture as being the test of cure. Of the 8% of women who reported genital infections, 50% had been treated with vaginal cream. Concerning data entries, 11% of the prenatal care cards indicated genital infection and 64% of those did not report any treatment. All the data demonstrated high percentages of both failure to record data and inadequate knowledge of the women as to the actual presence of such infections, the need for treatment and the proper follow-up. It was concluded that health care professionals need to reevaluate the way they assist patients during the prenatal care period, especially regarding the women’s information and the complete recording of data on the prenatal care card.
Herbs In Treatment Of Urinary Tract Infections
Manish Wasamwar,Vijay S.Wadha,Gopal S. Gond
Indian Streams Research Journal , 2012,
Abstract: It is known that urinary tract is very common source of infection and UTIs are second most common reason people visit their doctors each year. Escherichia coli is responsible for large majority of UTIs. UTIs is most commonly diagnosed bacterial infection in woman. Population at risk of complication include older woman, pregnant woman. Continuous antibiotics prophylaxis are used to treat and prevent recurrent urinary tract infections, frequent antibiotic use can result in vaginal and intestinal dysbiosis as well as antibiotic resistance. Thus, it is desirable to seek alternative methods of prevention and treatment of simple UTIs. Few herbal antimicrobial agents Vaccinium macrocarpon (Cranberry), Vaccinium myrtillus (Bilberry; Blueberry), Berberine, Arctostaphylos uva ursi (Bearberry) are proved to be very effective in preventing and treating urinary tract infections.
Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections  [PDF]
Serda Gülsün,Pa?a G?kta?
Dicle Medical Journal , 2004,
Abstract: To evaluate risk factors associated with recurrent urinary tract infections,we conducted a case- control study comparing 400 patients referred to aninfectious diseases outpatient clinic who had a history of recurrent urinary tractinfections (case patients) with 400 age, sex-matched control patients without ahistory of urinary tract infections. The distribution of 400 case patients to thegroups; 200 were women, 100 were men and 100 were children. 100 womenwere from 18 through 40 years of age (premenopausal) and 100 of them wereover 40 years of age (menopausal).Each patient completed a questionnaire providing an earlier history ofurinary tract infections, frequency of repeat episodes of urinary tract infections,having maternal history of urinary tract infections, recent antibiotic use,urogenital surgery history, marriage status and hygienic measures. In addition,physical examination of genitourinary system and laboratory investigation wasdone.In conclusion; our data support the view that some common factorsimportantly influence the incidence of recurrent urinary tract infections amongdifferent groups such as premenopausal, menopausal, men and childrengroups. These factors are; history of urinary tract infections, having urinarytract infections under the age of 15, recent antibiotic use in last one yearsperiod, urogenital surgery history and inappropriate hygienic measures.
Urinary tract infections and related symptoms in patients with gynecological
Serra KAMER,?zlem AKAGüNDüZ,Zeynep ?ZSARAN,Mustafa ESASSOLAK
Turkish Journal of Oncology , 2008,
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the genitourinary symptoms and the risk of urinary tract infections in patients with gynecological malignancy treated with radiotherapy. METHODS: Mid-stream specimens of urine were collected and urine cultures were performed in 45 patients with gynecological malignancy; genitourinary symptoms were recorded during pelvic radiotherapy. RESULTS: Before the treatment, urinary tract infections were detected in four patients, while during the treatment seven patients had positive urine cultures. Dysuria was recorded in five patients before radiotherapy, and at the end of treatment, 40 cases experienced grade 1 or 2 dysuria. No significant relationship was detected between urinary tract infection and clinical genitourinary symptoms. CONCLUSION: The most effective method to define urinary tract infection in patients with gynecologic malignancies is urine culture during the treatment. Routine prophylactic antibiotherapy is not recommended because of the low risk of infection during radiotherapy.
Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people  [cached]
Beveridge L,Davey PG,Phillips G,McMurdo MET
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2011,
Abstract: Louise A Beveridge1, Peter G Davey2, Gabby Phillips3, Marion ET McMurdo11Ageing and Health, Division of Medical Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, 2Health Informatics Centre, University of Dundee, 3Medical Microbiology Department, NHS TaysideAbstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.Keywords: urinary tract infection, elderly, review
Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people
Beveridge L, Davey PG, Phillips G, McMurdo MET
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S13423
Abstract: imal management of urinary tract infections in older people Review (12223) Total Article Views Authors: Beveridge L, Davey PG, Phillips G, McMurdo MET Published Date June 2011 Volume 2011:6 Pages 173 - 180 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S13423 Louise A Beveridge1, Peter G Davey2, Gabby Phillips3, Marion ET McMurdo1 1Ageing and Health, Division of Medical Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, 2Health Informatics Centre, University of Dundee, 3Medical Microbiology Department, NHS Tayside Abstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.
Urinary tract nosocomial infections at the Clinical centre in Kragujevac  [PDF]
?or?evi? Zorana,Ili? Milena
Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo , 2012, DOI: 10.2298/sarh1204184d
Abstract: Introduction. Urinary tract infections are the most frequent hospital infections and account for about 40% of total hospital infections. The main risk factor for their development is the use of catheters. Objective. Assessment of basic epidemiological and etiological characteristics of nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) and investigation of differences in risk factors among the patients with NUTIs with and without the urinary catheter. Methods. The study comprised patients treated in chosen units/ of the Clinical Center in Kragujevac, in whom NUTI was registered during 2009. Differences in risk factors for NUTIs between the catheterized and uncatheterized patients were tested by the logistic regression analysis. Results. NUTIs was registered in 162 patients whose average age was 66.2±13.5 years with approximately equal gender participation (51.2% men and 48.8% women). Almost three quarters of the patients with NUITs had indwelling urinary catheter, 12.0±7.7 days on average (from 1 to 39 days). In the patients with urinary catheter, the risk for NUITs was significantly positively associated with emergency admission to hospital treatment (p=0.0185). The uncatheterized patients had a significant frequency of malignant tumours comparing to the patients with a urinary catheter (p=0.039). The compared groups did not differ in other risk factors. The most frequently isolated microbial agents was Klebsiella spp (37.3%), then Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14.1%) and Proteus mirabilis (11.9%). Most of the bacteria showed a great level of resistance to frequently used antibacterial drugs, even up to 100%. Conclusion. It is necessary to define national recommendations for the prevention and control of NUTIs in the future.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.