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Role of community pharmacist in counselling asthma patient  [PDF]
Margret chandira,Debjit Bhowmik,Chiranjib,B.Jayakar
Journal of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology , 2009,
Abstract: Pharmacist plays an important role in patient healthcare.Asthma is a disease that affects the breathing passages of the lungs .Pharmacist now more patient oriented and have brought many changes in life of patients. Patient counseling is considered the most important parameter for insuring better health care, because here the pharmacist interacts with patients directly. Asthma is caused by chronic inflammation of these passages. This makes the breathing passages, or airways, of the person with asthma highly sensitive to various triggers."When the inflammation is "triggered" by any number of external and internal factors, the passages swell and fill withmucus. Muscles within the breathing passages contract , causing even further narrowing of the airways. This narrowing makes it difficult for air to be breathed out from the lungs. This resistance to exhaling leads to the typical symptoms of an asthma attack. Because asthma causes resistance, or obstruction, to exhaled air, it is called an obstructive lung disease. The medical term for such lung conditions is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD. COPD is actually a group of diseases that includes not only asthma but also chronic bronchitis and emphysema.Like any other chronic disease, asthma is a condition you live with every day of your life. You can have an attack any time you are exposed to one of your triggers. Unlike other chronic obstructive lung diseases, asthma is reversible.Asthma cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. You have a better chance ofcontrolling your asthma if it is diagnosed early and treatment is begun right away. With proper treatment, people with asthma can have fewer and less severe attacks. Without treatment, they will have more frequent and more severe asthma attacks and can even die. Asthma is on the rise in the United States and other developed countries like India. We are not sure exactly why this is, but these factors may contribute. We grow up as children with less exposure to infection than did our ancestors, which has made our immune systems more sensitive. We spend more and more time indoors, where we are exposed to indoor allergens such as dust and mold. The air we breathe is more polluted than the air most of our ancestors breathed. The frequency and severity of asthma attacks tend to decrease as a person ages. Asthma is the most common chronic disease of children Asthma has many costs to society as well as to the individual affected. Many people are forced to make compromises in their lifestyle to accommodate their disease.
Compliance with treatment: related-issues and insights for pharmacist intervention
Silva, Nilcéia Lopes da;Ribeiro, Eliane;Navarro, Jo?o Luis;Zanini, Antonio Carlos;
Brazilian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S1984-82502011000100002
Abstract: low patient compliance with pharmacotherapy remains one of the greatest challenges for success of treatments, especially in chronic diseases, since it can negatively influence treatment effectiveness and patient quality of life, increase health expenses and decrease productivity of the patient. compliance is an important but complex issue in clinical practice. its complexity begins with the difficulty in adopting terminology that can express its exact meaning. moreover, many methods to evaluate compliance have been established but no consensus exists on which method should be considered the gold standard. additionally, socioeconomic, disease and therapy-related factors, healthcare team and system related-factors and patient-related factors can simultaneously influence compliance levels. in this highly complex scenario, pharmacist interventions have been identified as an effective strategy to enhance patient compliance with treatment. the objectives of this paper were: (1) to provide useful information for pharmacists about issues related to compliance such as terminology and definitions; methods for measuring compliance and persistence; influencing factors and the impact of low compliance; and (2) to offer insight into how these healthcare professionals can effectively contribute toward improved compliance levels.
Effect of medication review and cognitive behaviour treatment by community pharmacists of patients discharged from the hospital on drug related problems and compliance: design of a randomized controlled trial
Abeer Ahmad, Jacqueline Hugtenburg, Laura MC Welschen, Jacqueline M Dekker, Giel Nijpels
BMC Public Health , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-133
Abstract: A randomized controlled trial will be performed. Community pharmacists will be randomized into a control group and an intervention group. 342 Patients, aged over 60 years, discharged from general and academic hospitals, using five or more prescription drugs for their chronic disease will be asked by their pharmacy to participate in the study.Patients randomized to the control group will receive usual care according to the Dutch Pharmacy Standard. The medication of patients randomised to the intervention group will be reviewed by the community pharmacist with use of the national guidelines for the treatment of diseases, when patients are discharged from the hospital. The Pharmaceutical Care network Europe Registration form will be used to record drug related problems. Trained pharmacy technicians will counsel patients at home at baseline and at 1,3,6,9 and 12 months, using Cognitive Behaviour Treatment according to the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The patient's attitude towards medication and patient's adherence will be subject of the cognitive behaviour treatment. The counselling methods that will be used are motivational interviewing and problem solving treatment. Patients adherence towards drug use will be determined with use of the Medication Adherence Report Scale Questionnaire. There will be a follow-up of 12 months.The two primary outcome measures are the difference in occurrence of DRPs between intervention and control group and adherence with drug use. Secondary endpoints are attitude towards drug use, incidence of Re-hospitalisations related to medicines, functional status of the patient, quality of life and the cost-effectiveness of this intervention.Combining both medication review and Cognitive Behaviour Treatment may decrease DRPs and may result in more compliance with drug use among patients discharged from the hospital and using 5 or more chronic drugs.Dutch Trial Register NTR1194Drug related problems (DRPs) are events or circumstances involving drug
Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients With or Without HIV on Hypertension and Their Experience in Using Their Medicines in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: The Role of the Pharmacist
GAB Kagashe, SA Fazal
Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research , 2011,
Abstract: Purpose: The study assessed the knowledge of both HIV and non-HIV hypertensive patients on hypertension and the role of pharmacists in their pharmaceutical care. Methods: The study was conducted at the hypertension and HIV clinics in government hospitals in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire and pharmacists were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire and by observation. Results: Few patients in both groups knew the names of antihypertensive medicines they were taking. Information on the use of antihypertensive and antiretroviral (ARV) medicines was mostly provided by doctors. Adverse drug reactions were significantly more when patient used both ARVs and antihypertensive medicines than when they used only antihypentsives. Only 20 % of hypertensive-HIV patients informed the pharmacist dispensing antihypertensive medicines that they were using ARVs, and only 19 % of the pharmacists knew the drug interactions between ARVs and antihypertensive medicines. During dispensing, about 2 % of the patients were asked about other medicines being used. Conclusion: There is a need to improve patients’ knowledge of hypertension. The pharmacists should also have up-to-date knowledge of hypertension-HIV co-morbidity. Proper coordination between HIV and hypertension clinics and the full integration of a pharmacist in the health care team can help to improve patient care.
ROLE OF PHARMACIST TOWARDS KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE IN COMPLIANCE WITH HYPERTENSION IN NORTH KARANATAKA IN SOUTH INDIAN CITY A BRIEF OVERVIEW  [PDF]
Biradar S S,Kapatae Rajashekhar,Reddy Srinivas,Raju S A
International Research Journal of Pharmacy , 2012,
Abstract: It is well known that the management of hypertension reduces the incidence further complications like myocardial infarction, stroke and vascular complications. Hypertension is a major health problem with individual, social and economical consequences. Knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) surveys are important and effective in terms of providing baseline for evaluating intervention programmes. In this brief review the role of pharmacist in hypertension better understanding of knowledge attitude and practice towards disease management was assessed. The data cited in this brief review were mainly selected the articles from Medline/Pub Med. The articles associated with Hypertension and Knowledge attitude and practice were randomly selected.The results obtained that pharmacological and non-pharmacological benefits can be achieved through the patient’s understanding of disease, medications & lifestyle modification when the pharmacist provides them with useful practical information, particularly counseling to hypertension. Acknowledgment of the role pharmacist in hypertension would be conducive to better understanding the pathogenesis of hypertension, and provide new insight for improved treatment and prevention.
Barriers to medication counselling for people with mental health disorders: a six country study
Aaltonen,S. Elina; Laine,Niina P.; Volmer,Daisy; Gharat,Manjiri S.; Muceniece,Ruta; Vitola,Anna; Foulon,Veerle; Desplenter,Franciska A.; Airaksinen,Marja S.; Chen,Timothy F.; Bell,J. Simon;
Pharmacy Practice (Internet) , 2010, DOI: 10.4321/S1886-36552010000200007
Abstract: provision of medication information may improve adherence and prevent medication related problems. people with mental health disorders commonly receive less medication counselling from pharmacists than people with other common long term and persistent disorders. objective: the objective of this study was to compare and contrast barriers pharmacy students perceive toward providing medication counselling for people with mental health disorders in australia, belgium, estonia, finland, india and latvia. methods: barriers identified by third-year pharmacy students as part of the international pharmacy students′ health survey were content analysed using a directed approach. students′ responses were categorised as pharmacist related, patient related, health-system related, or social or cultural related. quantitative data were analysed using spss version 14.0. results: survey instruments were returned by 649 students. of the respondents, 480 identified one or more barriers to medication counselling for people with mental health disorders. patient related factors accounted for between 25.3% and 36.2% of barriers identified by the pharmacy students. pharmacist related factors accounted for between 17.6% and 45.1% of the barriers identified by the pharmacy students. students in india were more likely to attribute barriers to pharmacist and social and cultural related factors, and less likely to health-system related factors, than students studying in other countries. conclusion: the nature of barriers identified by pharmacy students differed according to the country in which they studied. undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy education programs may need to be amended to address common misconceptions among pharmacy students.
Barriers to medication counselling for people with mental health disorders: a six country study  [cached]
Aaltonen SE,Laine NP,Volmer D,Gharat MS
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2010,
Abstract: Provision of medication information may improve adherence and prevent medication related problems. People with mental health disorders commonly receive less medication counselling from pharmacists than people with other common long term and persistent disorders.Objective: The objective of this study was to compare and contrast barriers pharmacy students perceive toward providing medication counselling for people with mental health disorders in Australia, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, India and Latvia.Methods: Barriers identified by third-year pharmacy students as part of the International Pharmacy Students’ Health Survey were content analysed using a directed approach. Students’ responses were categorised as pharmacist related, patient related, health-system related, or social or cultural related. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS version 14.0.Results: Survey instruments were returned by 649 students. Of the respondents, 480 identified one or more barriers to medication counselling for people with mental health disorders. Patient related factors accounted for between 25.3% and 36.2% of barriers identified by the pharmacy students. Pharmacist related factors accounted for between 17.6% and 45.1% of the barriers identified by the pharmacy students. Students in India were more likely to attribute barriers to pharmacist and social and cultural related factors, and less likely to health-system related factors, than students studying in other countries.Conclusion: The nature of barriers identified by pharmacy students differed according to the country in which they studied. Undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy education programs may need to be amended to address common misconceptions among pharmacy students.
Engaging community pharmacists in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: protocol for the Pharmacist Assessment of Adherence, Risk and Treatment in Cardiovascular Disease (PAART CVD) pilot study
Kevin P Mc Namara, Johnson George, Sharleen L O'Reilly, Shane L Jackson, Gregory M Peterson, Helen Howarth, Michael J Bailey, Gregory Duncan, Peta Trinder, Elizabeth Morabito, Jill Finch, Stephen Bunker, Edward Janus, Jon Emery, James A Dunbar
BMC Health Services Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-10-264
Abstract: This study will be a longitudinal pre- and post-test pilot study with a single cohort of up to 100 patients in ten pharmacies. Patients aged 50-74 years with no history of heart disease or diabetes, and taking antihypertensive or lipid-lowering medicines, will be approached for participation. Assessment of cardiovascular risk, medicines use and health behaviours will be undertaken by a research assistant at baseline and following the intervention (6 months). Validated interview scales will be used where available. Baseline data will be used by accredited medicines management pharmacists to generate a report for the treating community pharmacist. This report will highlight individual patients' overall CVD risk and individual risk factors, as well as identifying modifiable health behaviours for risk improvement and suggesting treatment and behavioural goals. The treating community pharmacist will use this information to finalise and implement a treatment plan in conjunction with the patient and their doctor. Community pharmacists will facilitate patient improvements in lifestyle, medicines adherence, and medicines management over the course of five counselling sessions with monthly intervals. The primary outcome will be the change to average overall cardiovascular risk, assessed using the Framingham risk equation.This study will assess the feasibility of implementing holistic primary CVD prevention programs into community pharmacy, one of the most accessible health services in most developed countries.Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry Number: ACTRN12609000677202Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally, accounting for an estimated 17.1 million deaths per annum - 29% of all deaths [1]. The relative contribution of CVD to the burden of disease remains high in countries with low-, middle-, and high incomes [1]. Despite significant gaps in research, there is sufficient evidence (particularly from developed nations such as the Unit
Protocol for the PINCER trial: a cluster randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led IT-based intervention with simple feedback in reducing rates of clinically important errors in medicines management in general practices
Anthony J Avery, Sarah Rodgers, Judith A Cantrill, Sarah Armstrong, Rachel Elliott, Rachel Howard, Denise Kendrick, Caroline J Morris, Scott A Murray, Robin J Prescott, Kathrin Cresswell, Aziz Sheikh
Trials , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1745-6215-10-28
Abstract: The aims of this study are to determine the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and acceptability of a pharmacist-led information-technology-based complex intervention compared with simple feedback in reducing proportions of patients at risk from potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management in general (family) practice.Research subject group: "At-risk" patients registered with computerised general practices in two geographical regions in England.Design: Parallel group pragmatic cluster randomised trial.Interventions: Practices will be randomised to either: (i) Computer-generated feedback; or (ii) Pharmacist-led intervention comprising of computer-generated feedback, educational outreach and dedicated support.Primary outcome measures: The proportion of patients in each practice at six and 12 months post intervention:- with a computer-recorded history of peptic ulcer being prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs- with a computer-recorded diagnosis of asthma being prescribed beta-blockers- aged 75 years and older receiving long-term prescriptions for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or loop diuretics without a recorded assessment of renal function and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months.Secondary outcome measures; These relate to a number of other examples of potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management.Economic analysis: An economic evaluation will be done of the cost per error avoided, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS), comparing the pharmacist-led intervention with simple feedback.Qualitative analysis: A qualitative study will be conducted to explore the views and experiences of health care professionals and NHS managers concerning the interventions, and investigate possible reasons why the interventions prove effective, or conversely prove ineffective.Sample size: 34 practices in each of the two treatment arms would provide at least 80% power (two-tailed alpha of 0.05) to demons
ASK YOUR PHARMACIST
Editor Journal
Journal of Global Pharma Technology , 2010, DOI: 10.1234/jgpt.v2i7.254
Abstract: ASK YOUR PHARMACIST
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