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EXPLORING THE BELIEFS OF PRIMARY EDUCATION TEACHERS REGARDING THE CONTRIBUTION OF MENTORING IN SCHOOLS  [cached]
Niki Phillips,Iosif Fagoulis
Review of European Studies , 2010, DOI: 10.5539/res.v2n2p201
Abstract: This paper examines the impact of mentoring in primary education. The research undertaken with primary education teachers working in schools of the Achaia Region, (Greece), analyses their beliefs and attitudes towards the implementation of mentoring and the relation of these attitudes with demographic data. Theories regarding the meaning, process, techniques and benefits of mentoring are explored in the first part in order to explain the impact of a mentor in a school environment. The second part presents and interprets the data collected and detects the relation between teachers′ attitudes and demographic data.
An Examination of Teacher's Pedagogical Philosophical Beliefs of Secondary Science Teachers in Sofia Public Schools, Sofia, Bulgaria  [PDF]
E. Boiadjieva,A. Tafrova-Grigorova,J.E. Hollenbeck,M. Kirova
Bulgarian Journal of Science and Education Policy , 2009,
Abstract: This investigation sought understand of the pedagogical philosophies of Bulgarian secondary science teachers in public schools in Sofia, Bulgaria, using the instrument that derived information for this study was an interview protocol consisting of six open-ended questions, with a numerical scoring analysis: the Teachers Pedagogical Philosophy Interview (TPPI). A review of literature shows there is no research on the pedagogical philosophical basis of teacher’s beliefs on teaching or on the effect of integrating constructivist teaching methodology in Bulgarian secondary science classrooms.
Patterns of Beliefs, Attitudes, and Characteristics of Teachers That Influence Computer Integration  [PDF]
Julie Mueller,Eileen Wood
Education Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/697357
Abstract: Despite continued acceleration of computer access in elementary and secondary schools, computer integration is not necessarily given as an everyday learning tool. A heterogeneous sample of 185 elementary and 204 secondary teachers was asked to respond to open-ended survey questions in order to understand why integration of computer-based technologies does or does not fit with their teaching philosophy, what factors impact planning to use computer technologies in the classroom, and what characteristics define excellent teachers who integrate technology. Qualitative analysis of open-ended questions indicated that, overall, educators are supportive of computer integration describing the potential of technology using constructivist language, such as “authentic tasks” and “self-regulated learning.” Responses from “high” and “low” integrating teachers were compared across themes. The diversity of the themes and the emerging patterns of those themes from “high and low integrators” indicate that the integration of computer technology is a complex concern that requires sensitivity to individual and contextual variables. 1. Introduction Digital technologies, and in particular computer technologies, are salient features at all levels of education today. Despite widespread access, however, computer-based technologies continue to be underutilized and the potential of these technologies as instructional tools is not being realized [1–3]. This problem has been evident for some time and continues to be an issue in both national and international contexts [4–10]. Integrating technology as a meaningful learning tool involves much more than simply providing equipment. Instead, integration of computer-based technologies can be seen as a “craft” [1] that evolves as educators adapt their teaching styles, beliefs, and practice. In order to promote mastery in the “craft,” it is important to investigate the specific role teachers as individuals play in the process of technology integration. The current study employed qualitative research methodology with a heterogeneous sample of practicing teachers to gain an in-depth understanding of how computer technologies fit within teachers’ repertoire of instructional tools and their own perceptions about what it is to be a technology-using teacher. By surveying a random sample of teachers from across an entire school district, this study presents a comprehensive picture of the beliefs and attitudes of the “average” teacher in elementary and secondary schools across the district. Computer technologies may be uniquely challenging
Primary teachers’ and primary pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes toward teaching profession
Cemalettin ?pek,Fatih Camadan
International Journal of Human Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: The main purpose of this study is to compare the primary teachers and pre-service primary teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes toward teaching profession in Turkey. Descriptive method was used in the study and the study was carried out on 180 first grade and 107 fourth grade primary pre-service teachers at the Faculty of Education in Rize University and 131 primary teachers working in the primary schools located in ayeli (Rize) district. The Attitude Scale towards Teaching Profession ( zgür, 1994) and the Turkish form of the Ohio State Teacher Efficacy Scale (Balo lu and Karada , 2008) were used as data gathering instrument in the study. The study results revealed that the first grade primary pre-service teachers’ scores on the attitudes towards teaching professions were statistically higher than the scores of the fourth grade primary pre-service teachers and of the primary teachers. However, the study results indicated that the teaching self-efficacy scores of the first grade pre-service teachers were statistically lower than the teaching self-efficacy scores of the fourth grade pre-service teachers and primary teachers. On the other hand, the study results showed that females’ attitudes towards teaching profession were higher than the attitudes of their male counterparts whereas self-efficacy scores did not differentiate due to the gender of the primary pre-service teachers and primary teachers. Moreover, the study results indicated that there were not any significant correlation between the self-efficacy and attitudes scores of the pre-service teachers and primary teachers.
A MODEL FOR BELIEFS, TOOL ACCEPTANCE LEVELS AND WEB PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PRESERVICE TEACHERS TOWARDS WEB BASED INSTRUCTION
Mehmet Bar?s HORZUM,Ozlem CANAN GUNGOREN
The Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education , 2012,
Abstract: One of the applications applied most nowadays is web based instruction (WBI). Although there are many studies on WBI, no study which researched the relations between beliefs for WBI, WBI tools acceptance levels and web pedagogical content knowledge (WPCK) of science and technology pre-service teachers was found among these studies. The aim of this study is to examine this relation. In accordance with this aim, the study group of the study consisted of 363 pre-service teachers. The data collected from pre-service teachers under the research were collected with scales of belief, tools acceptance and WPCK towards WBI. 3 scales were used for the data collection in the research. The data were analyzed with structural equation modeling in the research. As a result of the research, behavioral and contextual beliefs in WBI beliefs were medium level. Perceived usefulness, ease of use, perceived attitude and intention positively affect WBI tools acceptance levels of pre-service teachers. When the relation between beliefs, tools acceptance levels and web pedagogical content knowledge of science and technology education pre-service teachers towards WBI is analyzed, it is seen that beliefs towards WBI affect acceptance levels of WBI tools and WBI tools acceptance levels affect web pedagogical content knowledge.
Teachers’ beliefs and their intention to use interactive simulations in their classrooms
J Kriek, G Stols
South African Journal of Education , 2010,
Abstract: In this pilot study, we sought to examine the influence of the beliefs of Grade 10 to 12 physical science teachers on their intended and actual usage of interactive simulations (Physics Education Technology, or PhET) in their classrooms. A combination of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the Technology Acceptance Model and the Innovation Diffusion Theory was used to examine the influence of teachers’ attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control on their intention to use simulations in their classrooms. Using regression and factor analyses, it was found that beliefs about the perceived usefulness and the pedagogical compatibility of PhET have a significant effect on teachers’ attitude towards the use of the simulations in their classrooms. The expectations of the teachers’ colleagues contribute to the subjective norm of these teachers. The regression and partial correlation result also highlights the importance of teachers’ general technology proficiency. Although we were not able to confirm a direct link between attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and the teachers’ behaviour intention we show the influence of behaviour intention on the actual use of the simulations with an accuracy of 70.83%.
Teachers' beliefs and their intention to use interactive simulations in their classrooms  [cached]
Jeanne Kriek,Gerrit Stols
South African Journal of Education , 2010,
Abstract: In this pilot study, we sought to examine the influence of the beliefs of Grade 10 to 12 physical science teachers on their intended and actual usage of interactive simulations (Physics Education Technology, or PhET) in their classrooms. A combination of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the Technology Acceptance Model and the Innovation Diffusion Theory was used to examine the influence of teachers' attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control on their intention to use simulations in their classrooms. Using regression and factor analyses, it was found that beliefs about the perceived usefulness and the pedagogical compatibility of PhET have a significant effect on teachers' attitude towards the use of the simulations in their classrooms. The expectations of the teachers' colleagues contribute to the subjective norm of these teachers. The regression and partial correlation result also highlights the importance of teachers' general technology proficiency. Although we were not able to confirm a direct link between attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and the teachers' behaviour intention we show the influence of behaviour intention on the actual use of the simulations with an accuracy of 70.83%.
An information and communications technology (ICT)-enabled method for collecting and collating information about pre-service teachers' pedagogical beliefs regarding the integration of ICT  [cached]
Michael Vallance
Research in Learning Technology , 2007, DOI: 10.3402/rlt.v15i1.10912
Abstract: This paper describes a method that utilized technology to collect and collate quantitative and qualitative data about pre-service teachers' use of networked technologies during a 12-week undergraduate course, and the impact of this use on their pedagogical beliefs regarding the integration of information and communications technology (ICT). The technologies used captured and analysed students' spoken and written communication while engaging in four synchronous online tasks, and also collected evaluation data from online interviews, surveys and diaries. The richness of data afforded by this ICT-enabled method enabled the research to produce a rich narrative of how the students used the technology and provided evidence of a change in pre-service teachers' pedagogical beliefs during the course.
Beliefs and Attitudes about Childhood Epilepsy among School Teachers in Two Cities of Southeast Brazil  [PDF]
Karina Piccin Zanni,Thelma Sim?es Matsukura,Heber de Souza Maia Filho
Epilepsy Research and Treatment , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/819859
Abstract: Childhood epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder associated with profound psychosocial limitations epileptic children's routine. Lack of information and inappropriate beliefs are still the factors that most contribute to the stigma and discrimination. This study aimed at characterizing teacher's beliefs and attitudes at regular and special schools in two cities of southeastern Brazil where students with epilepsy studied. Fifty-six teachers of public regular schools and specialized educational institutions for children with disabilities from two cities of Southeast Brazil who had epileptic children in their classroom completed the Brazilian version of The Epilepsy Beliefs and Attitudes Scale: Adult Version and answered a data sheet about sociodemographic characteristics. The results showed that no significant differences ( ) have been found between the beliefs and attitudes of teachers in mainstream and special schools but both schoolteachers had more inappropriate beliefs and attitudes than appropriate ones against childhood epilepsy. These findings raise an important issue, providing us with the knowledge that epilepsy is still a condition which is surrounded by wrong beliefs. Also, educational programs could help reduce the gaps in knowledge about how such disease has been perceived worldwide. 1. Introduction Epilepsy is the most common chronic neurological disorder in childhood, affecting approximately 5 to 10 children in 1000 [1]. When compared to other chronic diseases, epilepsy is one of the disorders that most affects the behavior and quality of life of children, mainly because of lack of information about the condition that creates a gulf of misunderstanding. The social stigma, superstition, and irrational beliefs have a negative influence on daily life of children with epilepsy and their families [2]. Throughout centuries in the history of epilepsy, concepts related to causes, treatment, and cure of epilepsy have been extensively modified. Over the past 25 years, especially in the last decade, significant efforts have been developed against centuries of ignorance and stigma that result in discrimination against people with epilepsy [3]. It is necessary to understand the process of stigmatization, conceptions, and beliefs involved in epilepsy. Currently, in developed countries, magical explanations about epilepsy have led to biomedical data, but in poor countries information without scientific basis still persist, motivated by prejudice, stigma, and distorted beliefs. These beliefs, whose origins date back to the past, can make the
Patterns of Beliefs, Attitudes, and Characteristics of Teachers That Influence Computer Integration  [PDF]
Julie Mueller,Eileen Wood
Education Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/697357
Abstract: Despite continued acceleration of computer access in elementary and secondary schools, computer integration is not necessarily given as an everyday learning tool. A heterogeneous sample of 185 elementary and 204 secondary teachers was asked to respond to open-ended survey questions in order to understand why integration of computer-based technologies does or does not fit with their teaching philosophy, what factors impact planning to use computer technologies in the classroom, and what characteristics define excellent teachers who integrate technology. Qualitative analysis of open-ended questions indicated that, overall, educators are supportive of computer integration describing the potential of technology using constructivist language, such as “authentic tasks” and “self-regulated learning.” Responses from “high” and “low” integrating teachers were compared across themes. The diversity of the themes and the emerging patterns of those themes from “high and low integrators” indicate that the integration of computer technology is a complex concern that requires sensitivity to individual and contextual variables.
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