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Keratoacanthoma Arising in an Organoid Nevus (nevus Sebaceous)
Gupta Somesh,Handa Sanjeev,Rai Ranju,Kaur Inderjeet
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2000,
Abstract: Organoid nevi may rarely be complicated by development of keratoacanthoma. We report a 21-year old man who presented with a hyperkeratotic papule developing over a well demarcated hyperpigmented irregular plaque on the forehead. Histopathology revealed features suggestive of keratoacanthoma developing in a lesion of nevus sebaceous. Literature search revealed 11 such reported cases. Most of the reported patients were young and had lesions on the face. Such lesions should be excised completely to prevent any malignant change in the future.
Sebaceous carcinoma of cheek arising in a lesion of solar keratosis  [cached]
Karkuzhali Ponnuswamy,Gomathy Nellainayagam,Ahamed Parveen
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2009,
Abstract: Cutaneous extraocular sebaceous carcinoma is a rare tumor that frequently occurs on face and scalp. Sebaceous carcinoma is not considered to be associated with ultra violet radiation exposure. We describe a case of sebaceous carcinoma of the right side of the cheek occurring in a lesion of solar keratosis in a 44-year-old female, who is a farmer by occupation. Actinic keratosis carries about 8-20% risk for malignant transformation into squamous cell carcinoma. Other malignant lesions that have been reported to occur in actinic keratosis include basal cell carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma and trichilemmal carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the third case to be reported in English language literature. Unlike the two cases reported previously, this has occurred in a younger patient and presented as an ulcerative, invasive lesion of 3cm size. The association of actinic keratosis and sebaceous carcinoma indicate that solar UVR is probably of importance in the pathogenesis of sebaceous carcinoma, as in the case of squamous cell carcinoma.
A Metastasizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Solitary Epidermal Nevus
Masami Toya,Yuichiro Endo,Akihiro Fujisawa,Miki Tanioka,Yoshiaki Yoshikawa,Takao Tachibana,Yoshiki Miyachi
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/109632
Abstract: Aim. Secondary tumor rarely develops from epidermal nevus. We present a case of a metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma that developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. Case Report. An 82-years old Japanese female was presented with a red tumor on the left axilla. She reported that the tumor developed in a congenital epidermal nevus. A biopsy of the tumor showed that a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arose from the epidermal nevus. As a lymph node metastasis was found by sentinel lymph node biopsy, the patient received surgical excision of the lesion, axillary lymph node dissection, and postoperative radiation. Discussion. Secondary tumors developing in epidermal nevus are rare. To the best of our knowledge, only in two cases including the present case, SCC developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. There is no established clinical guideline for prophylactic removal of epidermal nevus. However, a biopsy should be done if a secondary malignancy is suspected in an epidermal nevus.
A Metastasizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Solitary Epidermal Nevus  [PDF]
Masami Toya,Yuichiro Endo,Akihiro Fujisawa,Miki Tanioka,Yoshiaki Yoshikawa,Takao Tachibana,Yoshiki Miyachi
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/109632
Abstract: Aim. Secondary tumor rarely develops from epidermal nevus. We present a case of a metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma that developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. Case Report. An 82-years old Japanese female was presented with a red tumor on the left axilla. She reported that the tumor developed in a congenital epidermal nevus. A biopsy of the tumor showed that a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arose from the epidermal nevus. As a lymph node metastasis was found by sentinel lymph node biopsy, the patient received surgical excision of the lesion, axillary lymph node dissection, and postoperative radiation. Discussion. Secondary tumors developing in epidermal nevus are rare. To the best of our knowledge, only in two cases including the present case, SCC developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. There is no established clinical guideline for prophylactic removal of epidermal nevus. However, a biopsy should be done if a secondary malignancy is suspected in an epidermal nevus. 1. Introduction The presence of secondary tumors in various types of congenital nevi is well known; however, malignancy associated with epidermal nevi is rare. Here, we present a case of a metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma that developed in a solitary epidermal nevus. 2. Case Report An 82-year-old Japanese female presented with a red tumor on the left axilla. She reported that the tumor developed in a verrucous plaque that had existed since birth. The size of the tumor was 25?mm in diameter, and the plaque was 45 × 40?mm (Figure 1(a)). A biopsy of the tumor showed that it was a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Surgical excision of the tumor and a sentinel lymph node biopsy of the right axilla were performed. Pathological examination showed that the SCC had invaded the subcutaneous fat tissue. The SCC developed within a papillomatous epidermal lesion showing hyperkeratosis and acanthosis (Figures 1(b) and 1(c)). The sentinel lymph node was positive for tumor cell; therefore, the patient underwent a subsequent axillary lymph node dissection and 60 Gray of postoperative radiation. Seven out of 30 excisional lymph nodes were positive for tumor cells. A computed tomography scan detected no metastasis to internal organs. We diagnosed the tumor as pT2N2bM0, stage IV (UICC 7th edn.). The patient was tumor-free for a year after the axillary lymph node dissection. Figure 1: (a) A red tumor on the left axilla developed in a congenital verrucous plaque. (b) SCC lesion (left side of the vertical bar) developed within the epidermal nevus (hematoxyline-eosin
Early onset sebaceous carcinoma
Dongjin Sung, Sara A Kaltreider, Federico Gonzalez-Fernandez
Diagnostic Pathology , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1746-1596-6-81
Abstract: A detailed histopathological study including p53 DNA sequencing was performed on an aggressive sebaceous carcinoma presenting in a healthy 32 year-old Caucasian woman. She had no history of retinoblastoma, evidence for a hereditary cancer syndrome, or radiation therapy. However, she potentially was at risk for excessive UV light exposure. A detailed review of the literature is also provided.A moderately well differentiated sebaceous carcinoma was established histopathologically arising from the meibomian gland of the upper eyelid. In most areas, the cytoplasm contained small but distinct Oil-red-O positive vacuoles. Direct sequencing of p53 identified a G:C→A:T mutation at a dipyrimidine site. The mutation results in substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine at residue 199 located at the p53 dimer-dimer interface. Energy minimization structural modeling predicts that G199R will neutralize negative charges contributed by nearby inter- and intramonomeric glutamate residues.This study points to the importance of recognizing that sebaceous carcinoma can occur in young patients with no evidence for hereditary cancer risk or radiation therapy. The G199R substitution is anticipated to alter the stability of the p53 tetrameric complex. The role of UV light in the etiology of sebaceous carcinoma deserves further study. Our findings, taken together with those of others, suggest that different environmental factors could lead to the development of sebaceous carcinoma in different patients.The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1227870450349458 webcite.Sebaceous carcinoma is generally considered to be a tumor of older patients (mean age, 73 years of age) [1]. In the ocular adnexa, this highly malignant neoplasm often masquerades as common benign lesions delaying appropriate treatment [2-4]. For unknown reasons, sebaceous carcinoma is more prevalent in the ocular adnexa than elsewhere in the body. It
Nevus Sebaceous: Response to Erbium YAG laser ablation  [cached]
Aithal Vijay
Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery , 2005,
Abstract: The potential of nevus sebaceous to undergo malignant change has prompted many physicians to undertake surgical excision of these lesions. Debulking surgery would leave an ugly scar, cosmetically not acceptable. Our aim was to find the therapeutic outcome and the final cosmetic appearance with Erbium YAG Laser ablation. A 19 year old boy with histologically proven Nevus Sebaceous over the forehead was taken up for ablation using Erbium YAG Laser. We also analyzed the post-operative results in another 6 patients who underwent Laser ablation of Nevus Sebaceous. All 7 patients did well, with no signs of recurrence. Also, all of them had a scar over the ablated area, which was cosmetically acceptable to them. Surgical excision with or without flap rotation, electro fulguration and Cryotherapy are other modalities to treat these lesions. However, they are either too expensive or leave a telltale scar. Erbium YAG Laser ablation is safe, effective and cosmetically acceptable in the treatment of Nevus Sebaceous.
Synchronous sebaceous lymphadenoma with squamous cell carcinoma – case report  [cached]
Shukla Mridula,Panicker Sathibai
World Journal of Surgical Oncology , 2003,
Abstract: Background Sebaceous lymphadenoma is a rare benign salivary gland tumour of uncertain histogenesis. So is synchronous occurrence of two benign or malignant neoplasms. Case-report 68-year-old female presented with right side parotid swelling associated with pain and gradual increase is size. Fine needle aspiration cytology of parotid swelling was suggestive of pleomorphic adenoma. Total conservative parotidectomy was performed and histopathology of the specimen revealed sebaceous lymphadenoma with squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions Sebaceous lymphadenoma and squamous cell carcinoma are two rare benign and malignant neoplasms arising in parotid gland. Synchronous occurrence of these two entities has not been reported.
Primary sebaceous gland carcinoma of pinna  [cached]
Agarwal Akhilesh,Gupta Souradip,Gupta Sandipan,Guha Gautam
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2009,
Abstract: Sebaceous gland carcinoma is a rare cancer most commonly seen in the meibomian glands of the eyelid. It has predilection for periocular region and is rarely found in extra ocular sites. A case of sebaceous gland carcinoma over back of left pinna is reported.
Nevus Sebaceous and Accompanying Lesions: A Clinicopathologic Review of Seven Patients  [PDF]
Nurten TURHAN-HAKTANIR,Yavuz DEM?R,F. Hüsniye D?LEK et al.
Duzce Universitesi Tip Fakültesi Dergisi , 2010,
Abstract: Purpose: Benign lesions are frequently develops in nevus sebaceous, while malignancies mayalso be seen rarely. We aimed to review the pathologies developed from nevus sebaceous in ourpatients. Material and method: Seven patients with nevus sebaceous, whose diagnoses andmanagements had been carried out in our department during the last six years, were reviewed.Diagnoses were verified by the examination of a pathologist. Results: In addition to the seven sebaceous nevi that were five in the scalp and two in the cheek,syringocystadenoma papilliferum in a patient, eccrine spiroadenoma in one patient, and bothsyringocystadenoma papilliferum and tubular apocrine adenoma in a patient were seen. Totalsurgical excision was performed for all patients. No recurrence was noticed in any of the tumorsin the follow-up. Conclusion: Prophylactic excision has been suggested because of the probable neoplastictransformations in elderly. In our series, early excision had been performed in almost all patientsand no malignant transformation was detected. Concerning the neoplastic changes are seenusually at the ages of 40-70 and aesthetically disturbing lesions rise in adolescent period, wesuggest that excision can be delayed to adolescent period.
A Case of Giant Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Buttock Possibly Arose from Syringocystadenoma and Invaded to the Rectum  [PDF]
Megumi Nishioka,Atsushi Tanemura,Takashi Yamanaka,Noriko Umegaki,Mamori Tani,Ichiro Katayama,Ichiro Takemasa,Mitsugu Sekimoto,Koichi Tomita,Noriyuki Tamai
Journal of Skin Cancer , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/213406
Abstract: We report a rare case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock infiltrated to the rectum. The tumor may have arisen from syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Since there was no sign of metastasis, radical operation including rectal amputation was performed after successful neoadjuvant therapies. Afterwards, the patient has been alive free from disease for 15 months with no lymph node and distant organ metastasis. 1. Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is one of the most common skin cancers and likely to occur on sun exposure regions. It is prevalent in men and increases with age. The incidence of SCC is increasing these days because of longevity and increased UV exposure associated with changes of lifestyle and destruction of the ozone layer. The larger and the deeper it grows, SCC is more likely to become metastatic [1]. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SP) is an uncommon benign lesion most frequently located on the head and neck. In a series of 100 cases of SP, one case occurred on the buttock [2]. SP is categorized as a kind of epidermal nevi which are organoid nevi arising from the pluripotential germinative cells in the basal layer of embryonic epidermis. These cells give rise not only to keratinocytes but also to skin appendages. These nevi have been often classified according to their predominant component, resulting in the terms nevus verrucosus (keratinocytes), nevus sebaceous (sebaceous glands), nevus comedonicus (hair follicles), and nevus suringocytadenosus papilliferum (or SP) (apocrine glands) [3]. Occasionally, malignant tumors develop on a preexisting SP. Many of them are basal cell carcinoma [3] less frequently SCC [4] and verrucous carcinoma [5, 6]. SCC rarely spreads from the buttock skin to the rectum although there is a report of a SCC arose from chronic perianal pyoderma that invaded around the rectum and prostate [7]. Here, we report a case of massive SCC of the buttock which may have originated from syringocystadenoma papilliferum and infiltrated deeply to the rectum. 2. Case Report A 48-year-old male admitted to our hospital suffering from a bulky mass on his left buttock and a foul odor. The mass on his left buttock was ?cm in diameter, and its surface was cauliflower-shaped with profuse exudates and ulceration (Figure 1). The skin around the cauliflower-shaped mass colored brownish to purplish and partly had ulcers likely penetrating to the mass. The patient noticed a part of an elongated oval nodule in childhood and its rapid growth in his late thirties. He stated that the nodule had grown to huge.
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