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Tumoral calcinosis  [cached]
Rao M,Reddy B,Nadeem M,D′souza Mariette
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1995,
Abstract: Tumoral calcinosis is an unusual clinical disorder in which large masses of calcium are deposited in the periarticular tissues of the body. The characteristic clinical, radiological and histopathological features of this disorder occurring in three middle aged female patients are reported.
Calcinosis tumoral de rodilla Tumoral calcinosis of the knee
Juan Pablo Restrepo,María del Pilar Molina
Acta Medica Colombiana , 2010,
Abstract: La calcinosis tumoral o síndrome de Teutschlander es una condición benigna y rara caracterizada por la presencia de masas calcificadas de ubicación periarticular en la cadera, hombro, codo y menor frecuencia en pies, tobillos y rodillas. Se cree que hay una alteración genética en el GALNT3 y FGF23 que regulan la absorción renal de fosfato. Usualmente esta lesión es asintomática y rara vez puede dar síntomas producto de compresión de estructuras vecinas. La imaginología permite habitualmente realizar el diagnóstico. Hasta el momento no hay tratamiento médico exitoso y se sigue recomendando la escisión quirúrgica aunque hay recurrencias (Acta Med Colomb 2010; 35: 185-186). Tumoral calcinosis or Teutschlander syndrome is a rare and benign condition characterized by the presence of calcified masses around the hip, elbow, and less frequently feet, ankles and knees. It is believed that there is a genetic alteration in GALNT3 and FGF23 which regulate the renal absorption of phosphate. Usually it is an asymptomatic lesion and occasionally it produces symptoms of compression to peripheral tissues. Imaging permits the diagnosis. There is no successful medical treatment and surgical excision is recommended although recurrences are frequent (Acta Med Colomb 2010; 35: 185-186).
Calcinosis tumoral de rodilla
Restrepo,Juan Pablo; Molina,María del Pilar;
Acta Medica Colombiana , 2010,
Abstract: tumoral calcinosis or teutschlander syndrome is a rare and benign condition characterized by the presence of calcified masses around the hip, elbow, and less frequently feet, ankles and knees. it is believed that there is a genetic alteration in galnt3 and fgf23 which regulate the renal absorption of phosphate. usually it is an asymptomatic lesion and occasionally it produces symptoms of compression to peripheral tissues. imaging permits the diagnosis. there is no successful medical treatment and surgical excision is recommended although recurrences are frequent (acta med colomb 2010; 35: 185-186).
Tumoral calcinosis with vitamin D deficiency  [cached]
Kannan Subramanian,Ravikumar Latha,Mahadevan Shiraam,Natarajan Mayilvahanan
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2008,
Abstract: A 50-year-old woman presented with recurrent calcified mass in the left gluteal region. The clinical, radiological, and biochemical profile confirmed the diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. She also had associated vitamin D deficiency. The patient underwent surgical removal of the mass to relieve the sciatic nerve compression and was managed with acetazolamide, calcium carbonate, and aluminium hydroxide gel with which she showed significant improve-ment. The management implications and effect of vitamin D deficiency on phosphate metabolism in the setting of tumoral calcinosis is discussed.
Tumoral calcinosis: Report of a case
SO Ogunlade, SA Salawu, RA Eyelade
African Journal of Biomedical Research , 2002,
Abstract: Tumoral calcinosis is a rare syndrome characterized by massive subcutaneous soft tissues deposits of calcium phosphate near the large joints. We report herein a 20 old boy with calcified lesions bilaterally involving the soft tissue over the greater trochanter. The serum calcium, phosphate and urea were normal.
Calcinosis tumoral: Reporte de cuatro casos
MARRERO RIVERóN,LUIS OSCAR; CáRDENAS CENTENO,ORLANDO M. DE; RONDóN GARCíA,VILMA; áLVAREZ CAMBRAS,RODRIGO; SáNCHEZ NODA,EDDY; CASTRO SOTO DEL VALLE,ANTONIO; BERNAL GONZáLEZ,MARIO; RODRíGUEZ VáZQUEZ,MATILDE;
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatolog?-a , 1998,
Abstract: 4 patients auffering from tumoral calcinosis, a rare entity considered within the heterotopic calcifications, are presented. the clinical, imaging and pathological findings are illustrated and discussed. literature is reviewed.
Acral post-traumatic tumoral calcinosis in pregnancy: a case report
Nick Hutt, Davinder PS Baghla, Vivek Gulati, Philip S Pastides, Mike C Beverly, Wassim A Bashir
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-5-89
Abstract: We present the case of a 31-year-old pregnant Indian woman with a three-month history of painful swelling within the tip of her right middle finger following a superficial laceration. She was otherwise well and had normal serum calcium and phosphate levels. Plain radiography demonstrated a dense, lobulated cluster of calcified nodules within the soft tissues of the volar pulp space, consistent with a diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. This diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of the histopathological examination following surgical excision.To the best of our knowledge, we present the only reported case of acral tumoral calcinosis within the finger, and the first description of its occurrence during pregnancy. We review the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of tumoral calcinosis.Tumoral calcinosis is an uncommon pathological entity characterized by multiple circumscribed, tumor-like, calcified masses in peri-articular connective tissue. These lesions mainly comprise calcium hydroxyapatite crystals and amorphous calcium phosphate [1]. They were originally described by Giard in 1898 [2] and termed endotheliome calcifie. The term tumoral calcinosis was coined by Inclan et al. in 1943 [3], who described a familial condition characterized by normal serum calcium levels and elevated or normal serum phosphate levels. The term "tumoral calcinosis" has also been loosely used to describe secondary metastatic peri-articular calcification occurring in conditions such as renal insufficiency, hyperparathyroidism, hypervitaminosis D and milk-alkali syndrome. These disorders display an underlying abnormality of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis. In contrast, dystrophic tumoral calcinosis occurs as a result of damaged or devitalized soft tissues, but in the presence of normal biochemistry, for example, following trauma, infection, inflammation or neoplasia.The most frequent cause of tumoral calcinosis is chronic renal failure, with a reported prevalence of 0.5% to 1.2% in patients
Tumoral calcinosis, calciphylaxis, hyperparathyroidism and tuberculosis in a dialysis patient  [cached]
Kammoun Khawla,Jarraya Fai?al,Hmida Mohamed,Khebir Abedelmajid
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2011,
Abstract: Tumoral calcinosis and calciphylaxis are uncommon but severe complications in ure-mic patients. They occur generally after long-term hemodialysis (HD) treatment explained by ad-vanced secondary hyperparathyroidism and longstanding high calcium phosphorus product (Ca × P). Other factors such granulomatous diseases may worsen the calcium phosphate homeostasis alterations. We report a young male patient treated by HD for 6 years who developed tuberculosis in addition to tumoral calcinosis and calciphylaxis.
Tumoral calcinosis in a dog with chronic renal failure : clinical communication  [cached]
T.C. Spotswood
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association , 2012, DOI: 10.4102/jsava.v74i1.498
Abstract: A 2-year-old male German shepherd dog in poor bodily condition was evaluated for thoracic limb lameness due to a large, firm mass medial to the left cranial scapula. Radiography revealed several large cauliflower-like mineralized masses in the craniomedial left scapula musculature, pectoral region and bilaterally in the biceps tendon sheaths. Urinalysis, haematology and serum biochemistry showed that the dog was severely anaemic, hyperphosphataemic and in chronic renal failure. The dog was euthanased and a full post mortem performed. A diagnosis of chronic renal failure with secondary hyperparathyroidism was confirmed. The mineralized masses were grossly and histopathologically consistent with a diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. Tumoral calcinosis associated with chronic renal failure that does not involve the foot pads is rarely seen.
Uraemic tumoral calcinosis in patients on haemodialysis in the renal unit at Dr George Mukhari Hospital, Pretoria
FE Suleman, V Mngomezulu, N Ebrahim
South African Journal of Radiology , 2010,
Abstract: Objective. Uraemic tumoral calcinosis refers to metastatic calcifications that occur rarely on the extensor surfaces of joints in patients undergoing long-term haemodialysis. The aim of the study was to assess the incidence of uraemic tumoral calcinosis in participants undergoing haemodialysis and to investigate any relationship that might exist between the development of uraemic tumoral calcinosis and the length of time on dialysis. Design. Twenty-four of the 25 patients on haemodialysis at the time of the study underwent radiographs of their shoulders and hips to look for calcinosis, which were then read by the researcher and two independent readers to assess for calcinosis. Study setting. Dr George Mukhari Hospital, Pretoria. Results. Eight per cent (N=2) of participants were found to have asymptomatic calcinosis of the hips. No relationship to length of time on dialysis was found. Conclusions. The study was constrained by a small sample size but the presence of calcinosis in 8% of the participants indicates that an extensive study of a larger sample could prove to be useful in determining the true incidence of uraemic tumoral calcinosis in the region. Long-term follow-up could provide more information on the development of calcinosis and length of time on dialysis.
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