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Perceptions, use and attitudes of pharmacy customers on complementary medicines and pharmacy practice
Lesley A Braun, Evelin Tiralongo, Jenny M Wilkinson, Ondine Spitzer, Michael Bailey, Susan Poole, Michael Dooley
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-10-38
Abstract: Pharmacy customers randomly selected from sixty large and small, metropolitan and rural pharmacies in three Australian states completed an anonymous, self administered questionnaire that had been pre-tested and validated.1,121 customers participated (response rate 62%). 72% had used CMs within the previous 12 months, 61% used prescription medicines daily and 43% had used both concomitantly. Multivitamins, fish oils, vitamin C, glucosamine and probiotics were the five most popular CMs. 72% of people using CMs rated their products as 'very effective' or 'effective enough'. CMs were as frequently used by customers aged 60 years or older as younger customers (69% vs. 72%) although the pattern of use shifted with older age.Most customers (92%) thought pharmacists should provide safety information about CMs, 90% thought they should routinely check for interactions, 87% thought they should recommend effective CMs, 78% thought CMs should be recorded in customer's medication profile and 58% thought pharmacies stocking CMs should also employ a complementary medicine practitioner. Of those using CMs, 93% thought it important for pharmacists to be knowledgeable about CMs and 48% felt their pharmacist provides useful information about CMs.CMs are widely used by pharmacy customers of all ages who want pharmacists to be more involved in providing advice about these products.Herbal medicines, nutritional and dietary supplements, also known as complementary medicines (CMs), have become increasingly popular in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Australia, with self-medication making up the majority of use [1-5].While it is difficult to provide exact data on the use of complementary medicine in Australia it is clear that a significant proportion (up to 75%) of the Australian public have used complementary medicine in a number of different forms [2,6,7]. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows an 80% increase in people employed as CM practitioners in the 10 years
Attitudes and Perceptions of Healthcare Providers and Medical Students Towards Clinical Pharmacy Services in United Arab Emirates
E Abu-Gharbieh, S Fahmy, BA Rasool, A Abduelkarem, I Basheti
Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research , 2010,
Abstract: Purpose: To explore healthcare providers' (HCPs) and medical students’ attitudes to, and perceptions of the pharmaceutical services that clinical pharmacists can provide in United Arab Emirates. Methods: A total of 535 participants (265 HCPs and 270 medical students) were asked to complete a questionnaire over a period of three months (January through March 2009). Results: Almost three quarters of the students perceived that the clinical pharmacist is an important part of the healthcare team while 82% believed that clinical pharmacists can help improve the quality of medical care in hospitals. Eighty one percent of medical students expressed confidence in the ability of clinical pharmacists to minimize medication errors. Although slightly more than half of the respondents (53%) reported that they did not have clinical pharmacy services in their institutions, there was substantial willingness among physicians and nurses to cooperate with clinical pharmacists. The majority of physicians (92%) and nurses (87%) expressed the view that the clinical pharmacist is an important integral part of the healthcare team. Conclusion: The HCPs and medical students in the study setting valued the role of clinical pharmacists in healthcare delivery. However, new developments in pharmacy services in the UAE hospital setting is recommended for adoption in hospitals.
Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of pharmacy and nursing students towards male circumcision and HIV in a KwaZulu-Natal University, South Africa  [cached]
Panjasaram V. Naidoo,Farzana Dawood,Christine Driver,Magdalene Narainsamy
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Background: Male circumcision is currently being promoted in South Africa as a HumanImmunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention method. Effective implementation requires thathealthcare providers should believe in the procedure’s efficacy and should possess a positiveattitude. A study was undertaken amongst pharmacy and nursing students with differentobjectives.Objectives: To ascertain students’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding malecircumcision and (HIV) prevention.Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study using anonymous questionnaires was undertakenamongst 4th year pharmacy and nursing students studying at a university in KwaZulu-Natal,after obtaining their consent. Data were captured and analysed using SPSS version 15.Results: A response rate of 83.18% and a mean knowledge score of 66.43% with relativelypositive attitudes (62.7) were obtained; 85.4% of the respondents felt that promoting malecircumcision is appropriate, with all Muslim students (n < 11) supporting the promotion ofmale circumcision. Even though all Muslim students supported male circumcision, only 3students were willing to perform the procedure if adequately trained (p < 0.03). The majorityof the female students were unwilling to perform the procedure (p < 0.005). A third of therespondents indicated that male circumcision would both undermine existing protectivebehaviours and strategies as well as increase riskier sexual behaviour. Over 54% of therespondents believed that the South African Health System would be able to cope with themassive male circumcision drive. The majority of the respondents favoured the procedure tobe done at birth. Pain was cited as the most important reason for not wanting to be circumcised.Conclusion: Pharmacy and nursing students have a moderate knowledge of male circumcisionand HIV prevention with relatively positive attitudes. The majority felt that promoting malecircumcision is appropriate and should be encouraged.
Understanding, perceptions and self-use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Malaysian pharmacy students
Syed S Hasan, Chew S Yong, Muneer G Babar, Cho M Naing, Abdul Hameed, Mirza R Baig, Shahid M Iqbal, Therese Kairuz
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-11-95
Abstract: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 systematically sampled pharmacy students from two private and one public university. A validated, self-administered questionnaire comprised of seven sections was used to gather the data. A systematic sampling was applied to recruit the students. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were applied using SPSS? version 18.Overall, the students tend to disagree that complementary therapies (CM) are a threat to public health (mean score = 3.6) and agreed that CMs include ideas and methods from which conventional medicine could benefit (mean score = 4.7). More than half (57.8%) of the participants were currently using CAM while 77.6% had used it previously. Among the current CAM modalities used by the students, CM (21.9%) was found to be the most frequently used CAM followed by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) (21%). Most of the students (74.8%) believed that lack of scientific evidence is one of the most important barriers obstructing them to use CAM. More than half of the students perceived TCM (62.8%) and music therapy (53.8%) to be effective. Majority of them (69.3%) asserted that CAM knowledge is necessary to be a well-rounded professional.This study reveals a high-percentage of pharmacy students who were using or had previously used at least one type of CAM. Students of higher professional years tend to agree that CMs include ideas and methods from which conventional medicine could benefit.National Center of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) defined complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine [1]. Due to the increasing demand from the public for more information regarding CAM, the understanding, perceptions and self-use of CAM among undergraduate health sciences students have become a topic of interest. This creates a challenge for the training of futu
Pharmacy Student Perceptions of Pharmacist Prescribing: A Comparison Study  [PDF]
Theresa L. Charrois,Meagen Rosenthal,Kreshnik Hoti,Christine Hughes
Pharmacy , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/pharmacy1020237
Abstract: Several jurisdictions throughout the world, such as the UK and Canada, now have independent prescribing by pharmacists. In some areas of Canada, initial access prescribing can be done by pharmacists. In contrast, Australian pharmacists have no ability to prescribe either in a supplementary or independent model. Considerable research has been completed regarding attitudes towards pharmacist prescribing from the perspective of health care professionals, however currently no literature exists regarding pharmacy student views on prescribing. The primary objective of this study is to examine pharmacy student’s opinions and attitudes towards pharmacist prescribing in two different settings. Focus groups were conducted with selected students from two universities (one in Canada and one in Australia). Content analysis was conducted. Four main themes were identified: benefits, fears, needs and pharmacist roles. Students from the Australian University were more accepting of the role of supplementary prescribing. In contrast, the Canadian students felt that independent prescribing was moving the profession in the right direction. There were a number of similarities with the two groups with regards to benefits and fears. Although the two cohorts differed in terms of their beliefs on many aspects of prescribing, there were similarities in terms of fears of physician backlash and blurring of professional roles.
Public’s attitudes towards community pharmacy in Qatar: a pilot study
El Hajj MS, Salem S, Mansoor H
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S22117
Abstract: blic’s attitudes towards community pharmacy in Qatar: a pilot study Original Research (3959) Total Article Views Authors: El Hajj MS, Salem S, Mansoor H Published Date August 2011 Volume 2011:5 Pages 405 - 422 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S22117 Maguy Saffouh El Hajj, Samah Salem, Hend Mansoor College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Objectives: To assess the public’s attitudes towards the community pharmacist’s role in Qatar, to investigate the public’s use of community pharmacy, and to determine the public’s views of and satisfaction with community pharmacy services currently provided in Qatar. Materials and methods: Three community pharmacies in Qatar were randomly selected as study sites. Patients 16 years of age and over who were able to communicate in English or Arabic were randomly approached and anonymously interviewed using a multipart pretested survey. Results: Over 5 weeks, 58 patients were interviewed (60% response rate). A total of 45% of respondents perceived community pharmacists as having a good balance between health and business matters. The physician was considered the first person to contact to answer drug-related questions by 50% of respondents. Most patients agreed that the community pharmacist should provide them with the medication directions of use (93%) and advise them about the treatment of minor ailments (79%); however, more than 70% didn’t expect the community pharmacist to monitor their health progress or to perform any health screening. Half of the participants (52%) reported visiting the pharmacy at least monthly. The top factor that affected a patient’s choice of any pharmacy was pharmacy location (90%). When asked about their views about community pharmacy services in Qatar, only 37% agreed that the pharmacist gave them sufficient time to discuss their problem and was knowledgeable enough to answer their questions. Conclusion: This pilot study suggested that the public has a poor understanding of the community pharmacist’s role in monitoring drug therapy, performing health screening, and providing drug information. Several issues of concern were raised including insufficient pharmacist–patient contact time and unsatisfactory pharmacist knowledge. To advance pharmacy practice in Qatar, efforts may be warranted to address identified issues and to promote the community pharmacist’s role in drug therapy monitoring, drug information provision, and health screening.
GREEN PHARMACY: AN ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE
Neeta Shivakumar*, Pushpa Agrawal and Praveen Kumar Gupta
International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research , 2013,
Abstract: The people in India have an outstanding knowledge of medicinal plants acquired over centuries. A passion for studying medicinal plants is evident both in folk and scholarly traditions. The indigenous mode of understanding and using plants is different from the modern scientific way. It includes botanical, medical and astrological elements. This is the basis of green pharmacy. Indians obviously care for medicinal plants because they know so many of them, so much about them and have worked extensively on their application. It is a remarkable fact that the use of medicinal plants is still a living tradition in the form of a million village-based folk carriers. These traditional birth attendants, bonesetters, herbal healers and wandering monks are invisible to policy makers and therefore not taken into account as a public health resource. Apart from these specialised folk healers there are also millions of women and elders with traditional knowledge of food and nutrition and herbal home-remedies. However, the revitalisation of this vast and diverse folk tradition does not appear on the Governments agenda. Here is an attempt to introduce these traditional knowledge with an emphasis of Nevadensin that holds a promising substance to cure many of the diseases naturally.
Knowledge and perceptions of pharmacy students towards training in complementary and alternative health care  [cached]
Ilse Truter
Health SA Gesondheid , 2005, DOI: 10.4102/hsag.v10i2.191
Abstract: Complementary and Alternative Health Care (CAHC) is the primary source of health care for over 70% of the world’s population. Opsomming Komplementêre en Alternatiewe Gesondheidsorg (KAG) is die hoofbron van gesondheidsorg vir meer as 70% van die wêreld se bevolking. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.
Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University
Benino,D.; Girardi,A.; Czarniak,P.;
Pharmacy Practice (Internet) , 2011, DOI: 10.4321/S1886-36552011000400011
Abstract: objectives: to examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the bachelor of pharmacy course at an australian university. methods: the university uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. results: descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit. conclusion: this study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. this result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically.
Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University
Benino D,Girardi A,Czarniak P
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2011,
Abstract: Objectives: To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University.Methods: The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. Results: Descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit. Conclusion: This study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. This result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically.
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