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Novel Methods in the Study of the Breast Cancer Genome: Towards a Better Understanding of the Disease of Breast Cancer  [PDF]
Jian Li, Xue Lin, Nils Brünner, Huanming Yang, Lars Bolund
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2012.325101
Abstract: Rapidly developing sequencing technologies and bioinformatic approacheshave provided us with an unprecedented instrument allowing for an unbiased and exhaustive characterization of the cancer genome in genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic dimensions. This review introduces recent excitingfindings and new methodologies in genomic breast cancer research. With this development, cancer genome research will illuminate new delicate interactionsbetween molecular networks and thereby unravelthe underlying biological mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. It also holds promise for providing a molecular clock for the estimation of the temporal processes of tumorigenesis. These methods in combination with single cell sequencing will make it possible to construct a family tree elucidating the evolutionary lineage relationships between cell populations at single-cell resolution. The anticipatedrapid progress in genomic breast cancer research should lead to anenhanced understanding of breast cancer biology andguide us towardsnovel ways to ultimatelyprevent and cure breast cancer.
Details of Particulars of Benefit Finding through the Experiences of Breast Cancer Patients Analysis on Breast Cancer Journals Written by Patients  [PDF]
Migiwa Nakada, Mizue Shiromaru, Satomi Mizutani
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2017.71009
Abstract: This study aims to analyze the descriptions in breast cancer journals written by patients and to understand the experience of benefit finding among patients with breast cancer. We selected 22 such breast cancer journals written by patients published after 2000 in Japan. The extracted statements related to benefit finding of patients experiencing breast cancer from the 22 journals were subjected to a qualitative analysis, and the following seven benefit finding elements were extracted: “Gratitude toward others”, “Benefits due to cancer”, “Happiness at living a normal life”, “Realization of and satisfaction with my growth”, “Awareness of the meaning of my existence”, “Hopes for life”, and “Willingness to contribute to others”. These benefit findings suggest that these particulars fulfill cultural, practical, spiritual, and social meanings, and lead to self-revaluation in daily life.
Breast cancer in southern Brazil: association with past dietary intake
Di Pietro,P. F.; Medeiros,N. I.; Vieira,F. G. K.; Fausto,M. A.; Belló-Klein,A.;
Nutrición Hospitalaria , 2007,
Abstract: objective: to determine possible associations between the risk of breast cancer in brazilian women and demographic, social and economical variables, and past dietary intake. methods: a case-control study was conducted in joinville, santa catarina, brazil, between june and november 2003 involving a group of 33 women recently diagnosed with breast cancer and a control group of 33 healthy women volunteers. personal details, health history and past dietary intake were obtained via questionnaires and interviews. data between groups were compared using χ2, fisher, and student's t test, whilst associations were evaluated using a non-conditional logistic regression method and odds ratio (or). results: statistically significant differences between the two groups were revealed with respect to age distribution (p = 0.007), family income level (p = 0.02), educational level (p < 0.0001) and attainment of menopause (p < 0.0001). after adjustment, with regard to family income level, of the data concerning past dietary intake, the consumption of pig lard (or = 6.32) and fatty red meat (or = 3.48) were found to be associated with an increase in the risk of breast cancer. the regular ingestion of apples (or = 0.30), watermelons (or = 0.31), tomatoes (or = 0.16), plain cakes (or = 0.30) and desserts (or = 0.20) afforded some degree of protection against the development of the disease. conclusions: age (> 45 years), low family income (< $520/month), poor educational level (primary school level or lower) and past regular consumption of pork fat and fatty meat may be factors associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.
An Analysis of The Methods Employed for Breast Cancer Diagnosis  [PDF]
Mahjabeen Mirza Beg,Monika Jain
International Journal of Research In Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: Breast cancer research over the last decade has been tremendous. The ground breaking innovations and novel methods help in the early detection, in setting the stages of the therapy and in assessing the response of the patient to the treatment. The prediction of the recurrent cancer is also crucial for the survival of the patient. This paper studies various techniques used for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Different methods are explored for their merits and de-merits for the diagnosis of breast lesion. Some of the methods are yet unproven but the studies look very encouraging. It was found that the recent use of the combination of Artificial Neural Networks in most of the instances gives accurate results for the diagnosis of breast cancer and their use can also be extended to other diseases.
An Analysis of the Methods Employed for Breast Cancer Diagnosis  [PDF]
Mahjabeen Mirza Beg,Monika Jain
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: Breast cancer research over the last decade has been tremendous. The ground breaking innovations and novel methods help in the early detection, in setting the stages of the therapy and in assessing the response of the patient to the treatment. The prediction of the recurrent cancer is also crucial for the survival of the patient. This paper studies various techniques used for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Different methods are explored for their merits and de-merits for the diagnosis of breast lesion. Some of the methods are yet unproven but the studies look very encouraging. It was found that the recent use of the combination of Artificial Neural Networks in most of the instances gives accurate results for the diagnosis of breast cancer and their use can also be extended to other diseases.
Deciding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details?
Russell BJ, Ward AM
Cancer Management and Research , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S12998
Abstract: iding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details? Review (3450) Total Article Views Authors: Russell BJ, Ward AM Published Date May 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 191 - 199 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S12998 Bethany J Russell, Alicia M Ward Southern Adelaide Palliative Services, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, SA, Australia Abstract: Communicating effectively with patients who have advanced cancer is one of the greatest challenges facing physicians today. Whilst guiding the patient through complex diagnostic and staging techniques, treatment regimens and trials, the physician must translate often imprecise or conflicting data into meaningful personalized information that empowers the patient to make decisions about their life and body. This requires understanding, compassion, patience, and skill. This narrative literature review explores current communication practices, information preferences of oncology patients and their families, and communication strategies that may assist in these delicate interactions. Overwhelmingly, the literature suggests that whilst the majority of patients with advanced cancer do want to know their diagnosis and receive detailed prognostic information, this varies not only between individuals but also for a given individual over time. Barriers to the delivery and understanding of information exist on both sides of the physician–patient relationship, and family dynamics are also influential. Despite identifiable trends, the information preferences of a particular patient cannot be reliably predicted by demographic, cultural, or cancer-specific factors. Therefore, our primary recommendation is that the physician regularly asks the patient what information they would like to know, who else should be given the information and be involved in decision making, and how that information should be presented.
Imaging in breast cancer – breast cancer imaging revisited
David Mankoff
Breast Cancer Research , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/bcr1359
Abstract: Some of these imaging modalities have entered routine use in the clinic. Breast MRI is frequently used in the management of breast cancer, especially to determine the extent of disease in the breast and to direct local therapy [7]. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is increasingly used in staging advanced or recurrent breast cancer and in monitoring response to therapy and has received approval for Medicare re-imbursement for these clinical indications [8]. MRS and optical breast cancer imaging are not yet in routine clinical use, but increasingly compelling data in patients will likely to lead to more clinical use in the near future.Lehman and Schnall [7] from the Universities of Washington and Pennsylvania provide a broad overview of the current and future uses of contrast-enhanced breast MRI. They review breast MRI imaging approaches that emphasized either temporal or spatial resolution. These approaches have been successfully merged to provide an optimal combination of sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection. New computer-based analysis methods may improve the ability to interpret the large volumes of data generated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The authors describe the use of breast MRI to direct local therapy and highlight work using MRI to measure primary or 'neo-adjuvant' systemic therapy. They review exciting recent work using breast MRI for screening high-risk women, showing the ability to detect lesions not found by mammography. As we continue to refine our estimate of a woman's individual risk of breast cancer, it is likely that breast MRI will play a role, perhaps complementary to mammography, in screening for high-risk patients. The development of newer and possibly more targeted MRI contrast agents may expand the capabilities of breast MRI.Using much of the same technology needed for breast MRI, MRS provides a method for characterizing the chemical composition of breast cancer in vivo. Bolan, Nelson, Yee and Garwood [9] from the Uni
Deciding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details?  [cached]
Russell BJ,Ward AM
Cancer Management and Research , 2011,
Abstract: Bethany J Russell, Alicia M WardSouthern Adelaide Palliative Services, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, SA, AustraliaAbstract: Communicating effectively with patients who have advanced cancer is one of the greatest challenges facing physicians today. Whilst guiding the patient through complex diagnostic and staging techniques, treatment regimens and trials, the physician must translate often imprecise or conflicting data into meaningful personalized information that empowers the patient to make decisions about their life and body. This requires understanding, compassion, patience, and skill. This narrative literature review explores current communication practices, information preferences of oncology patients and their families, and communication strategies that may assist in these delicate interactions. Overwhelmingly, the literature suggests that whilst the majority of patients with advanced cancer do want to know their diagnosis and receive detailed prognostic information, this varies not only between individuals but also for a given individual over time. Barriers to the delivery and understanding of information exist on both sides of the physician–patient relationship, and family dynamics are also influential. Despite identifiable trends, the information preferences of a particular patient cannot be reliably predicted by demographic, cultural, or cancer-specific factors. Therefore, our primary recommendation is that the physician regularly asks the patient what information they would like to know, who else should be given the information and be involved in decision making, and how that information should be presented.Keywords: metastatic, communication, prognosis, physician–patient relations
Novel Multistatic Adaptive Microwave Imaging Methods for Early Breast Cancer Detection  [cached]
Xie Yao,Guo Bin,Li Jian,Stoica Petre
EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing , 2006,
Abstract: Multistatic adaptive microwave imaging (MAMI) methods are presented and compared for early breast cancer detection. Due to the significant contrast between the dielectric properties of normal and malignant breast tissues, developing microwave imaging techniques for early breast cancer detection has attracted much interest lately. MAMI is one of the microwave imaging modalities and employs multiple antennas that take turns to transmit ultra-wideband (UWB) pulses while all antennas are used to receive the reflected signals. MAMI can be considered as a special case of the multi-input multi-output (MIMO) radar with the multiple transmitted waveforms being either UWB pulses or zeros. Since the UWB pulses transmitted by different antennas are displaced in time, the multiple transmitted waveforms are orthogonal to each other. The challenge to microwave imaging is to improve resolution and suppress strong interferences caused by the breast skin, nipple, and so forth. The MAMI methods we investigate herein utilize the data-adaptive robust Capon beamformer (RCB) to achieve high resolution and interference suppression. We will demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methods for breast cancer detection via numerical examples with data simulated using the finite-difference time-domain method based on a 3D realistic breast model.
Breast cancer, dermatofibromas and arsenic  [cached]
Dantzig Paul
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2009,
Abstract: Background: Dermatofibromas are common benign tumors in women, and breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The aim of this study is to determine if there is any relationship between the two conditions. Materials and Methods: Five patients with dermatofibromas and 10 control patients (two groups) had their skin biopsies measured for arsenic by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Fifty randomly selected patients with breast cancer and 50 control patients were examined for the presence of dermatofibromas. Results: The dermatofibromas were found to have an arsenic concentration of 0.171 micrograms/gram, compared with 0.06 and 0.07 micrograms/gram of the two control groups. Forty-three out of 50 patients with breast cancer had dermatofibromas and 32/50 patients with breast cancer had multiple dermatofibromas, compared to 10/50 control patients with dermatofibromas and only 1/50 with multiple dermatofibromas. Conclusions: Arsenic is important in the development of dermatofibromas and dermatofibromas represent a reservoir and important sign of chronic arsenic exposure. Dermatofibromas represent an important sign for women at risk for breast cancer, and arsenic may represent the cause of the majority of cases of breast cancer.
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