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Hidden Stories, Toxic Stories, Healing Stories: The Power of Narrative in Peace and Reconciliation  [cached]
Stephan Marks
Narrative Works , 2011,
Abstract: Research on narrative is more than simply listening to (more or less) nice stories. There are stories that are hidden between the lines; these need to be noticed and retrieved. There are stories that can be toxic to be exposed to; these need to be coped with and conceived. But there may be stories that have a healing quality, too—stories that can contribute to peace and reconciliation. These three possible qualities of narratives are the focus of the following paper, which was delivered in October 2008, at the launch of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. The lecture was based on his interdisciplinary research project "Geschichte und Erinnerung" [History and Memory, www.geschichte-erinnerung.de] in which interviews with Nazi followers, bystanders, and perpetrators were conducted and analysed. Marks presented one of the key findings of this research—shame—and its effect on what the interviewees recounted, as well as its relevance for National Socialism and present-day German society.
Narrative Inquiry: Honouring the Complexity of the Stories We Live  [cached]
Carl Leggo
Brock Education : a Journal of Educational Research and Practice , 2004,
Abstract: Narrative inquiry focuses on the composition of a story as a way to represent experiences. A challenge for narrative researchers is how to compose a story that represents experiences truthfully while also acknowledging that in all our narrative research we can never tell the whole story. There are always far more experiences than we can narrate in the complex and wide-ranging experiences that each of us lives daily. This paper considers the complexity of researching lived stories in order to invite readers to enter into an ongoing and energetic dialogue. I want to honour the multiplicity, meaning making, and mystery that are at the heart of the searching in narrative research.
Narrative and figurative self-construction in meaningful stories
Kupferberg, Irit;
Linguagem em (Dis)curso , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S1518-76322010000200007
Abstract: the present study tests the validity of two claims foregrounded in current qualitative studies of troubled talk. first, single story-internal organizing figurative forms constitute succinct versions of troubled narrators' selves. second, figurative clusters contribute to the construction of narrators' selves when some external or internal obstacle undermines communication. to explore this link between narrative and figurative self-construction, the study espouses a discourse-oriented approach which acknowledges the importance of conceptual metaphor theory as well as a multimethods research design comprising qualitative and quantitative analyses. the analysis of a corpus of 101 meaningful stories produced by young israeli adults supports the intriguing link between narrative and figurative self-construction.
An Approach to Teaching Short Stories  [cached]
Kui Yan
International Journal of Business and Management , 2009,
Abstract: Presentation of short stories in class can be made effectively and interestingly: (1) to give a brief lecture on the literary conventions of the short story in the first class; (2) to make preparation in both of vocabulary and cultural or background information; (3) to require students to read the story carefully, analyzing the character, setting and plot, finding the theme and determining the author’s point of view; (4) to encourage students to discuss and explore the story in detail.
Healthy economics or cautionary tales? The narrative microeconomics of four Matthean healing stories
L Anderson
HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies , 2009,
Abstract: This article explores the four Matthean stories wherein an individual supplicant requests a healing on behalf of someone else: the centurion for his paralyzed servant, the ruler for his dead daughter, the Canaanite woman for her demon-possessed daughter, and the man for his epileptic son. The paper proposes a methodology of narrative microeconomic analysis. By applying the method to the stories, a pattern of three primary exchanges is observed: the locational, healing and confl ict exchanges. By examining how the stories conform to and deviate from this pattern, a complex picture of the textual microeconomies emerges, one that contradicts the unitary macro-narrative of healing. The microeconomic analysis reveals Jesus to be a complex, ambivalent fi gure: He creates confl icts that hinder the healing process and invariably excludes someone or some group before completing any healing. The pedagogical, formational and theological implications of these complexities are briefl y considered in local and global contexts.
Healthy economics or cautionary tales? The narrative microeconomics of four Matthean healing stories  [cached]
Laura Anderson
HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies , 2009, DOI: 10.4102/hts.v65i1.320
Abstract: This article explores the four Matthean stories wherein an individual supplicant requests a healing on behalf of someone else: the centurion for his paralyzed servant, the ruler for his dead daughter, the Canaanite woman for her demon-possessed daughter, and the man for his epileptic son. The paper proposes a methodology of narrative microeconomic analysis. By applying the method to the stories, a pattern of three primary exchanges is observed: the locational, healing and conflict exchanges. By examining how the stories conform to and deviate from this pattern, a complex picture of the textual microeconomies emerges, one that contradicts the unitary macro-narrative of healing. The microeconomic analysis reveals Jesus to be a complex, ambivalent figure: He creates conflicts that hinder the healing process and invariably excludes someone or some group before completing any healing. The pedagogical, formational and theological implications of these omplexities are briefly considered in local and global contexts. How to cite this article: Anderson, L., 2009, ‘Healthy economics or cautionary tales? The narrative microeconomics of four Matthean healing stories’, HTS Teologiese/Theological Studies 65(1), Art. #320, 16 pages. DOI: 10.4102/hts.v65i1.320
Fostering the Learner Spirituality of Students: A Teaching Narrative  [cached]
Jane P. Preston
Brock Education : a Journal of Educational Research and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to articulate, via a personal teaching narrative, the successes and challenges I experienced while attempting to foster the learner spirituality of students within a middle school classroom environment. I provide a definition of the term learner spirituality, as well as its related phrases. I present a literature review about how to foster learner spirituality within the classroom. Then I present a personnel narrative that depicts my experience while trying to promote the learner spirituality of a grade 7 classroom, and, in line with narrative inquiry, I discuss the past, present, and future features of this personal experience. An implication of this study is that in order for teachers to influence the learning spirituality of students, teachers need to cogitate on their own learner spirituality.
Gypsy dragon: An evolutionary approach to narratives
?vorovi? Jelena
Glasnik Etnografskog Instituta SANU , 2007, DOI: 10.2298/gei0701205c
Abstract: This paper will attempt to explain Serbian Gypsy oral narratives by applying concepts drawn from evolutionary psychology. The Gypsy story will illustrate how various narrative characteristics are used by Gypsies to employ social knowledge on local surroundings to better serve fitness solutions.
Stories of Snow and Fire: The Importance of Narrative to a Critically Pluralistic Environmental Aesthetic  [PDF]
John Charles Ryan
Humanities , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/h2010099
Abstract: Written narratives enable humans to appreciate the natural world in aesthetic terms. Firstly, narratives can galvanize for the reader a sense for another person’s experience of nature through the aesthetic representation of that experience in language. Secondly, narratives can encode and document for the human appreciator as writer an experience of nature in aesthetic terms. Through different narrative lenses, the compelling qualities of environments can be crystallized for both the reader (who vicariously experiences nature through language) and the human appreciator (who directly experiences nature through the senses). However, according to philosopher Allen Carlson’s “natural environmental model” of landscape aesthetics, science provides the definitive narrative that represents nature on its own terms and catalyzes appropriate appreciation. In this article, I examine Carlson’s claim and argue for an environmental aesthetic philosophy of narrative multiplicity. Such a model would draw from scientific, indigenous, and journalistic narrative modes toward a critically pluralistic environmental aesthetic of the natural world. The ethical framework I propose—the function of which I characterize simply as narrative “cross-checking”—acknowledges the value of narrative heterogeneity in expressing and generating aesthetic experience of environments. This article’s thesis is forwarded through extensive treatment of these three narratives expressed within two examples, one of geographical place and one of environmental practice. As I will suggest, Denali, the prominent Alaskan mountain, can be aesthetically appreciated through the diverse narratives enumerated above. As a second case study, the traditional burning regimes of indigenous peoples reveal collectively how a critically pluralistic environmental aesthetic of narratives can be applied to—and identified to exist within—ecocultural practices, such as firing the landscape.
The forgotten children of Africa: Voicing HIV and Aids orphans’ stories of bereavement: a narrative approach  [cached]
Amanda Richter,Julian Müller
HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies , 2009, DOI: 10.4102/hts.v61i3.464
Abstract: This article looks at the bereavement of children left orphaned by the HIV and Aids pandemic that is crippling the continent of Africa. Their bereavement is examined by means of the narrative approach and by integrating this approach with the traditional African art of storytelling. By listening to the stories of three Zulu children, the article gives them the opportunity to express their own unique stories of bereavement: stories that would otherwise have been silenced by the wave of bereavement in the wake of countless deaths worldwide as a result of HIV and Aids infection. It looks at the losses these children have suffered, their greatest fears and how their Zulu culture and customs influence their emotional experience of losing their parents. The article shows how they can – by means of storytelling – reformulate the story of their lives and find the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.
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