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The “Learning in order to Teach” project and mediation in museums using Brazilian sign language (Libras)  [PDF]
Daina Leyton,Cibele Lucena,Joana Zatz Mussi
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2008,
Abstract: This article seeks to reflect on mediation in museums based on experiences that occurred in the “Learning in order to Teach” Project. In this case, the mediation acquires specific characteristics because it deals with young deaf people learning art-related contents in order to teach other youth in their first language. The most interesting aspect of this encounter between museum and deaf culture is a mutual, immediate and highly visible influence. While museum-goers and professionals understand that the “gestures” used by the deaf are not random (rather, on the contrary, they make up a complex language), new signs are created by the students based on the contents that are worked with and discovered in the museum. These new signs thus enrich the language itself and begin to circulate within the community.
The “Learning in order to Teach” project and mediation in museums using Brazilian sign language (Libras) (Portuguese original version)  [PDF]
Daina Leyton,Cibele Lucena,Joana Zatz Mussi
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2008,
Abstract: This article seeks to reflect on mediation in museums based on experiences that occurred in the “Learning in order to Teach” Project. In this case, the mediation acquires specific characteristics because it deals with young deaf people learning art-related contents in order to teach other youth in their first language. The most interesting aspect of this encounter between museum and deaf culture is a mutual, immediate and highly visible influence. While museum-goers and professionals understand that the “gestures” used by the deaf are not random (rather, on the contrary, they make up a complex language), new signs are created by the students based on the contents that are worked with and discovered in the museum. These new signs thus enrich the language itself and begin to circulate within the community.
Museums for Science Education: can we make the difference? The case of the EST project
Maria Xanthoudaki,Brunella Tirelli,Patrizia Cerutti,Sara Calcagnini
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2007,
Abstract: This paper addresses the role of museums in education in science and technology through the discussion of a specific project entitled EST “Educate in Science and Technology”. The Project puts together methodologies and activities through which museums can be used as resources for long-term project work. In-service training for teachers, work in class with learning kits or with materials brought in by a Science Van, and visits to the museum are planned and developed jointly by museum experts and teachers. The Project proposes a teaching and learning model which sees the museum experience as central and integral part of a teaching and learning process with more effective outcomes. The analysis of the Project activities and methodologies is based on the work carried out at the National Museum of Science and Technology Leonardo da Vinci, which perceives the learner (the visitor) at the heart of its educational methodologies and provision.
Optimisation using Natural Language Processing: Personalized Tour Recommendation for Museums  [PDF]
Mayeul Mathias,Assema Moussa,Fen Zhou,Juan-Manuel Torres-Moreno,Marie-Sylvie Poli,Didier Josselin,Marc El-Bèze,Andréa Carneiro Linhares,Francoise Rigat
Computer Science , 2015, DOI: 10.15439/2014F336
Abstract: This paper proposes a new method to provide personalized tour recommendation for museum visits. It combines an optimization of preference criteria of visitors with an automatic extraction of artwork importance from museum information based on Natural Language Processing using textual energy. This project includes researchers from computer and social sciences. Some results are obtained with numerical experiments. They show that our model clearly improves the satisfaction of the visitor who follows the proposed tour. This work foreshadows some interesting outcomes and applications about on-demand personalized visit of museums in a very near future.
DEVELOPMENT OF MUSEUMS, ARCHIVES AND LIBRARIES IN E-EUROPE: PROJECT OF EC CALIMERA
Mozuraite, Vita,Rudzioniene, Jurgita
Knygotyra , 2006,
Abstract: Over the last decade, the social role of local cultural institutions of all kinds has changed. A shift from the use of information on traditional paper-based carriers to electronic formats has takenplace. The implementation of technology has brought about the modernisation of basic work processes and widened the range of services and channels of access. There is closer intra- and interdomain co-operation both at national and international level. It is no longer easy to draw clear boundaries between archives, libraries and museums in terms of digital content provision.Memory institutions such as libraries, museums and archives are adjusting themselves to the digital age. Web-based services have been expanded, remote use of online catalogues and the accessibility of digitised heritage have all been improved. The task now is to create and promote new services which reach and motivate more people. New services require new tools, many of them ICT-based – and above all a new attitude.CALIMERA (Cultural Applications: Local Institutions Mediating Electronics Resource Access) Co-ordination Action, funded under Information Society Technologies Sixth Framework Programme has set out to help ordinary citizens right across Europe to join e-Europe through the digital services provided by their local cultural institutions. CALIMERA has continued to contribute to the sharing of best practice, producing guidelines and roadmaps with a special focus of local archives and museums and addressing the needs of the end user.The aim of CALIMERA Best Practice Guidelines is to provide policy makers and professionals working in cultural institutions at the local level with a concise and relevant summary of the state of the art in the use of new technologies. These Guidelines are intended to explain in a readable way how these technologies can be deployed to develop digital services designed to meet real user needs – social, cultural and economics – to stimulate wider take-up and creativity among the professional community. They are also intended to support a clearer understanding of the way in which local cultural services can play a key role in the fulfilment of major policy goals in Europe,including those of the e-Europe Action Plan.There are 23 separate Guidelines in all structured as three main roups covering Social, Management and Technical issues. Life-long learning, social disjuncture, cultural diversity, egovernment,social and economical development are the main problems discussed in the Social Policy Guidelines. In Management Guidelines one can meet the same problems discu
Changing University Language Classroom
Irena Darginavi ien , Alvyda Liuolien , Lora Tamo iūnien , Vilhelmina Vai iūnien
Journal of Pedagogy and Psychology "Signum Temporis" , 2008, DOI: 10.2478/v10195-011-0008-7
Abstract: Introduction The article looks into a foreign language teacher situation with the focus on teachers' attitude in the IT classroom. Aim of the Study Related to the EU Structural Funds project "Developing Lifelong Learning Access: Innovative Means and Methods in Teaching Foreign Languages at Mykolas Romeris University". The goal of the project is to provide university students and professors with the possibilities of learning an additional EU working language with the help of a digital laboratory. Materials and Methods Teacher attitude research was carried out with the help of a questionnaire and this article deals with the following statements from the conducted questionnaire: 1) attitude towards the use of IT in foreign language learning, 2) interest in innovative language teaching methods, 3) willingness to experiment and test new methods, 4) attitude to a friendly learning enviroment, 5) concerns with learning outcomes. Results The results of the questionnaire point to the areas of further discussion of what teachers really think in having a media in the classroom and exploiting electronic sources, thus being positive towards progressive methods in teaching.
Self-access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students  [cached]
Andrew Yau Hau Tse
English Language Teaching , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/elt.v5n12p163
Abstract: Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a self-access language learning centre (SALLEC). The findings revealed students find it helpful and useful to exploit the self-learning materials in the centre. Lecturers strongly agree that the centre can promote autonomous learning. To conclude, self-learning should be promoted in Malaysia to enhance language learning and acquisition.
Use of Websites to Increase Access and Develop Audiences in Museums: Experiences in British National Museums  [cached]
Margarida Loran
DIGITHUM , 2005,
Abstract: Many authors argue that digital technologies, and particularly the World Wide Web, have great potential to serve the challenges faced by museums in relation to access and audience development, which involves reaching and nurturing both existing and new audiences. But what initiatives are there, and how effective are they? What strategies and actions are museums undertaking to take advantage of this potential? What is it being done to establish closer ties with core audiences or to attract new audiences? And what is the audience response to the museums' efforts? The British experience in this field is of particular interest because it shows a political context favourable to the development of this emerging area of museum work, and it provides some remarkable and exemplary cases from which to learn good practices.
Access to mathematics versus access to the language of power: the struggle in multilingual mathematics classrooms
M Setati
South African Journal of Education , 2008,
Abstract: In this article I explore how teachers and learners position themselves in relation to use of language(s) in multilingual mathematics classrooms. I draw from two studies in multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa. The analysis presented shows that teachers and learners who position themselves in relation to English are concerned with access to social goods and positioned by the social and economic power of English. They do not focus on epistemological access but argue for English as the language of learning and teaching. In contrast, learners who position themselves in relation to mathematics and so epistemological access, reflect more contradictory discourses, including support for the use of the their home languages as languages of learning and teaching.
Access to mathematics versus access to the language of power: the struggle in multilingual mathematics classrooms
Mamokgethi Setati
South African Journal of Education , 2008,
Abstract: In this article I explore how teachers and learners position themselves in relation to use of language(s) in multilingual mathematics classrooms. I draw from two studies in multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa. The analysis presented shows that teachers and learners who position themselves in relation to English are concerned with access to social goods and positioned by the social and economic power of English. They do not focus on epistemological access but argue for English as the language of learning and teaching. In contrast, learners who position themselves in relation to mathematics and so epistemological access, reflect more contradictory discourses, including support for the use of the their home languages as languages of learning and teaching.
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