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Moshe Idel, Maimonides and the Jewish Mystic  [cached]
Petru Moldovan
Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies , 2002,
Abstract: Moshe Idel, Maimonides and the Jewish Mystic, Dacia Publishing House, Cluj-Napoca, 2001
Mu'tazilites, Al-Ash'Ari and Maimonides on divine attributes  [PDF]
Belo, Catarina
Veritas , 2007,
Abstract: Este artigo analisa o debate acerca dos atributos divinos na teologia islamica medieval, mais especificamente na teologia mu'tazilita e ash'arita. Nele se compara a abordagem de teologia islamica medieval com a de Moisés Maimónides (m. 1204), filósofo judeu do período medieval. Em particular este artigo debru a-se sobre a identifica o dos atributos divinos com a essência de Deus na teologia mu'tazilita que se desenvolveu na primeira metade do século IX, e analisa a rea o dos ash'aritas que se seguiu e que insistiu em considerar os atributos divinos enquanto entidades reais, separadas da essência de Deus. Maimónides, conhecedor da tradi o do Kalam, apresenta uma solu o que n o envolve a predica o de atributos divinos que comprometeria a unidade divina. This article analyses the debate concerning divine attributes in medieval Islamic theology (kalam), more specifically in Mu‘tazilite and in Ash‘arite theology. It further compares their approach with that of medieval Jewish philosopher Moses Maimonides (d. 1204). In particular it studies the identification of the divine attributes with God’s essence in Mu‘tazilite theology, which flourished in the first half of the 9th century. It discusses the Ash‘arite response that followed, and which consisted in considering God’s attributes as real entities separate from God’s essence. Maimonides, conversant with the tradition of kalam, proposes a solution that does not involve the predication of any attributes that would undermine his oneness.
Moses as a role model in the Serbia charters after 1371 changing patterns  [PDF]
Vujo?evi? ?arko
Balcanica , 2008, DOI: 10.2298/balc0839069v
Abstract: The aspects of the Old Testament figure of Moses highlighted in the charters of post-Nemanji Serbia, or under the Lazarevi and Brankovi dynasties (1371-1459), testify to a changed attitude towards Old Testament role models. While members of the Nemanji house such as the archbishop Sava I and the rulers Stefan of De ani and Du an look up to Moses as a "religious leader", a prayerful intercessor before God and a victorious warrior, all of that for the sake of the "chosen" people, the role he is assigned in the arengae of the charters issued by prince Lazar and despots Stefan Lazarevi and ura Brankovi is completely different. In the universal Christian context of the post-1371 arengae Moses figures as a "prophet" and the builder of the Tabernacle - a prefiguration of the Church, thereby epitomizing a major stage in the salvation history of humankind. The role of Moses, as well as that of David, the only other Old Testament figure still referred to in the charters of the period, has a universal ecclesiologically interpreted, significance. This new pattern of interpreting Moses implies that the ruler’s main virtue now becomes his concern for the "true faith" and the houses of God. The practice of the Nemanji s as regards selection and interpretation of Old Testament themes is reestablished by the titular despots of the Brankovi dynasty. In their charters, the first part of the Bible with Moses as a popular leader reassumes a "national" character and becomes part of the ideological apparatus intended to posit the Serbs as a "New Israel".
Eternal time, eternal secret: the thesis of the eternity of time in Maimonides' guide of the perplexed
Eslava,Edgar;
Discusiones Filosóficas , 2011,
Abstract: in an excellent article that traces the logical structure of maimonides' guide of the perplexed and his arguments on the existence of god, william lane craig (1988 122-147), concludes that most of the guide's impact rests precisely on its rigorous method of deduction. perhaps, in craig's view, this is one of the things that makes maimonides a model for further conciliating attempts between theology and philosophy. however, despite his careful analysis, there is one idea that craig mentions and leaves undeveloped, namely, that a certain notion of eternity of time underlies maimonides' argumentative scheme. trying to go beyond the examples craig offered in his article, my method toward a final solution to the question is divided in three steps. the first one is a reconstruction of craig's statements and its interpretation as supporting material for his conclusion. then, i present three alternative views about maimonides' beliefs on the creation of the world, an issue strongly attached to his idea of time. finally, i use the material of the two former sections to support an answer to my question.
Moses, Elijah, and Jesus: Reflections on the basic structures of the Bible  [cached]
Abraham van de Beek
In die Skriflig , 2012, DOI: 10.4102/ids.v46i1.43
Abstract: This article deals with the end of the lives of Moses and Elijah as the representatives of the Torah and the Prophets. Moses was not allowed to enter the Promised Land, and Elijah left it before he was taken up. These events are interpreted as indicating that the Law is not able to bring the people into the Promised Land and that the Prophets cannot keep them there. The end of Moses’ life is also the end of the Torah. The Prophets end with the call for a new Elijah. The Ketubim, as the human response on God’s acting, do not better. The Hebrew Bible ends with the exile. The New Testament begins where the Prophets end: a new Elijah, in the person of John the Baptist. He works at exactly the place where Israel entered the land after Moses’ death and where Elijah left the land. It is a reprise of the fulfilment of the promise. John points to Jesus, who begins his work at this place, not going on dry feet through the Jordan River,but fulfilling all righteousness when drawn into the water of God’s judgement. Then the way to the land is open to Moses and Elijah in the glory of God on the Mount of Transfiguration, when they speak about the exodus of Jesus on the cross. Salvation is not in the law or in conversion but in being baptised into Christ in his death. Moses, Elia en Jesus: Oorwegings oor die fundamentele strukture van die Bybel. Hierdie artikel gaan oor die einde van die lewes van Moses en Elia as die personifikasies van die Torah en die profete. Moses is verhinder om in die beloofde land in te gaan en Elijah moes dit verlaat voordat hy hemel toe gegaan het. Hierdie gebeurtenisse word so ge nterpreteer dat die Wet die volk nie in die beloofde land kan bring nie, en dat die profete hulle nie daar kan hou nie. Die einde van die lewe van Moses is ook die einde van die Torah. Die profete eindig met die oproep vir ’n nuwe Elia. Die Ketubim as die menslike antwoord op God se dade doen nie beter nie. Die Hebreeuse Bybel eindig in die ballingskap. Die Nuwe Testament begin daar waar die profete eindig: ’n nuwe Elia, in die persoon van Johannes die Doper. Hy werk op presies daardie plek waar Israel na Moses se dood die land ingekom het en waar Elia dit verlaat het. Daar is ’n terugkeer na die vervulling van die belofte. Johannes wys na Jesus wat sy werk op hierdie plek begin. Hy gaan nie droogvoet deur die Jordaan nie maar gaan onder in die water van God se oordeel om alle geregtigheid te vervul. Dan is die pad na die land oop vir Moses en Elia en verskyn hulle in die glorie van God op die berg van die verheerliking, waar hulle met Jesus oor sy exodus aan die
Moses revisited. August Strindberg’s and Edvard Munch’s dramatic use of the figure of Moses  [cached]
Camilla Storskog
Altre Modernità , 2011,
Abstract: In this essay I explore the literary interpretation of the figure of Moses in August Strindberg’s and Edvard Munch’s contemporary plays, Genom knar till arvland (Through Deserts to Ancestral Lands, 1903) and Den fri Kj rligheds By (The City of Free Love, ca. 1905). In the first case, the focus is on the examination of Moses as an archetypical character. Analogies are subsequently drawn between the biblical hero and other dramatic characters in the production of the Swedish playwright, such as Gustav Vasa or Birger jarl. In the latter case, I outline the strategy for a parodic reuse of the biblical source in Munch’s invention of a modern Moses created to mock his fellow painter and maestro Christian Krohg and the bohemian ideal of free love. Although the qualities of the Moses character take on different and opposite meanings in the two authors, it is of interest that the issue of a return to the common heritage of biblical culture should make itself evident in the years following both Strindberg’s and Munch’s farewell to the secular milieus of the Bohème.
The mystifying mosaic of Moses: On Pentateuch theory and Biblical spirituality
Christo Lombaard
HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies , 2011, DOI: 10.4102/hts.v67i3.1121
Abstract: In this article, developed for and from a 2010 invited guest e-lecture presented at St. Edward’s University, Austin, Texas, unexpected historical and theological parallels between Pentateuch Theory and Biblical Spirituality are indicated. Both have inherent confessional impulses, and have always had those. This is indicated by first describing Pentateuch Theory in these terms, by then providing a graphic model of Biblical Spirituality, and in conclusion by summarising the parallels and the inherent existential dynamics involved in both academic fields. How to cite this article: Lombaard, C., 2011, ‘The mystifying mosaic of Moses: On Pentateuch theory and Biblical spirituality’, HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies 67(3), Art. #1121, 5 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/hts.v67i3.1121
Stephane Moses, Sistem si revelatie. Filosofia lui Franz Rosenzweig/ System and revelation. Franz Rosenzweig’s Philosophy  [cached]
Iulia Iuga
Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies , 2004,
Abstract: Stephane Moses, Sistem si revelatie. Filosofia lui Franz Rosenzweig Bucuresti, Ed. Hasefer, Colectia Judaica, 2003
"Father to no one": gender, genealogy, and storytelling in go down, Moses "Father to no one": gender, genealogy, and storytelling in go down, Moses
Barbara Ladd
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: "Was", the first story of Go Down, Moses, opens with the disclaimer that the protagonist Isaac McCaslin is "father to no one" and that the story to follow: was not something participated in or even seen by himself, but by his elder cousin, McCaslin Edmonds, grandson of Isaac's father's sister and so descended by the distaff, yet notwithstanding the inheritor, and in his time the bequestor, of that which some had thought then and some still thought should have been Isaac's, since his was the name in which the title to the land had first been granted from the Indian patent and which some of the descendants of his father's slaves still bore in the land. But Isaac was not one of these... (3). What is almost immediately clear is that the hook opens with issues of gender, genealogy, and inheritance foregrounded, and that these issues concern not merely the transmission of land from generation to generation but the transmission of stories, a kind of "naming" of one's relationship to the past that echoes the assigning of family names in the above passage. "Was", the first story of Go Down, Moses, opens with the disclaimer that the protagonist Isaac McCaslin is "father to no one" and that the story to follow: was not something participated in or even seen by himself, but by his elder cousin, McCaslin Edmonds, grandson of Isaac's father's sister and so descended by the distaff, yet notwithstanding the inheritor, and in his time the bequestor, of that which some had thought then and some still thought should have been Isaac's, since his was the name in which the title to the land had first been granted from the Indian patent and which some of the descendants of his father's slaves still bore in the land. But Isaac was not one of these... (3). What is almost immediately clear is that the hook opens with issues of gender, genealogy, and inheritance foregrounded, and that these issues concern not merely the transmission of land from generation to generation but the transmission of stories, a kind of "naming" of one's relationship to the past that echoes the assigning of family names in the above passage.
A Measure of Victory: Go Down, Moses and the Subversion of Racial Codes  [cached]
Abdul-Razzak Al-Barhow
English Language and Literature Studies , 2013, DOI: 10.5539/ells.v3n1p31
Abstract: This article studies the way white and black characters in Go Down, Moses engage with the racial codes inside the McCaslin plantation. It tries to examine the impact of William Faulkner's engagement with social change and race relations on the structure of the seven stories that make up the text of Go Down, Moses. It argues that there is a measure of triumph in the continuous attempts by both black and white characters at subverting the racial order in the southern plantation even though these attempts are quite often subverted by counter attempts at maintaining the status quo. The book achieves a “measure of victory” in the way its narrative techniques acknowledge and respect the otherness of black people and, more importantly, in the way its white and black characters maintain their determination to subvert the codes of the Southern racial ideology.
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