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Growth and Yield of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L) as Influenced by Plant Population in Arid Tropic of Sudan under Rain-fed
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry , 2012, DOI: 10.5923/j.ijaf.20120203.02
Abstract: Growth plant is the result of transfer of solar radiation in to the photosynthetic processes of green leaf and transmission of photosynthates into increased biomass. Recently, many researchers have manipulated plant row-spacing and direction as well as plant populations within the row, to increase crop production through more efficient use of solar energy. A field experiment was conducted in North Kordofan State of Sudan, to investigate the effect of intra – row spacing (10, 20, 30 and 40cm) and planting stand (two and three plants per stand) on yield and yield components of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. The results showed that, plant population had a significant effect on most of the attributes measured. Closer spacing increased the number of branches per plant, days to 50% flowering, days to 95% physiological maturity, number of calyces per plant, calyces yield (g/plant) and decreased final calyces yield (t/ha). Spacing of 20 cm and three plants per stand gave highest calyces yield (t/ha).
Vascular Wilt of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. var. sabdariffa) in the Humid Forest Region of South-western Nigeria  [PDF]
N.A. Amusa,A.A. Adegbite,M.O. Oladapo
Plant Pathology Journal , 2005,
Abstract: The etiology of vascular wilt of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa var. sabdariffa L.) was investigated at Ibadan, in the humid forest region of south-western Nigeria. Out of 250 Roselle plants examined, 26% exhibited symptoms of wilt. The vascular wilting of Roselle was associated with Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. Emend. Snyd and Hans. Plant debris was found associated with the fungus.
Nutritional Evaluation of Fermented Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) Calyx
O. Ojokoh,F.C. Adetuyi,F.A. Akinyosoye
Journal of Food Technology , 2013,
Abstract: Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) Calyx was fermented traditionally and by controlled fermentation using puer strains of Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The proximate composition shows that there was significant increase (P=0.05) in protein content (14.7?2.5-10.8?1.1%) of the fermented samples compared to the unfermented (4.8?1.3%). The antinutritional composition of the samples showed a significant decrease (P=0.05) in the phytate and tannin content (488.8?3.7-752.4?7.5 mg/100g and 1.21?0.1-1.92?0.0%) of the fermented samples in comparison to the unfermented 2143.6?0.8 mg/100g and 5.30?1.1%). The nutritional evaluation revealed that there was a decline in growth in the albino rats on all the treatments except for control diet where there was increase in growth. Serum aspertate amino transferase (AST) and serium alanine amino transferase (ALT) activities of the rats fed with the calyx samples were higher (268.0?11.5-409.3?12.4 i? LG and 19.0?1.1-23.5?1.7 i? LG ) than the control (208.0?406 and 16.4?11.8 i? LG ).
Corolla of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) as acid-base indicator  [cached]
Siti Nuryanti,Sabirin Matsjeh,Chairil Anwar,Tri Joko Raharjo
European Journal of Chemistry , 2013, DOI: 10.5155/eurjchem.4.1.20-24.620
Abstract: Acid-base titration requires indicators to show color change at each pH interval. Synthetic indicators applied recently have some negatives, such as chemical pollution, availability and expensive production cost. Effort to obtain natural product-based-indicator from corolla of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) has been conducted. Firstly, anthocyanin contained in the Roselle’s corolla was identified. Then, the indicator was obtained by extracting the corolla consecutively with n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol-HCl 0.5%. Then the filtrate was evaporated at 65 oC. The obtained indicator was applied in weak base-strong acid and weak acid-strong base titrations. The comparison indicators used in this research were methyl orange and phenolphthalein. The results showed that the Roselle’s corolla indicator gave red color in acidic solution, while green in basic solution. Additionally, its performance is similar to that of methyl orange.
Natural cross-pollination in roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae)
Vaidya, K.R.;
Genetics and Molecular Biology , 2000, DOI: 10.1590/S1415-47572000000300027
Abstract: two local varieties of roselle (hibiscus sabdariffa l.), jamaican green and jamaican red, were grown to determine the amount of natural cross-pollination. two planting arrangements (alternating rows; alternating individuals in a row) and two planting dates, a month apart, were used for the outcrossing experiments. stem pigmentation, red (r-) vs. green (rr), was used as a genetic marker in the estimation of outcrossing. homozygous dominant and recessive genotypes of jamaican red and jamaican green, respectively, were grown in both of the planting arrangements and dates. seeds from open-pollinated capsules of randomly selected jamaican green plants were planted to score the frequency of cross-pollination. estimates of natural cross-pollination ranged from 0.20 ± 0.09% to 0.68 ± 0.34%. roselle outcrosses at a low rate in jamaica.
Natural cross-pollination in roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae)  [cached]
Vaidya K.R.
Genetics and Molecular Biology , 2000,
Abstract: Two local varieties of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.), Jamaican Green and Jamaican Red, were grown to determine the amount of natural cross-pollination. Two planting arrangements (alternating rows; alternating individuals in a row) and two planting dates, a month apart, were used for the outcrossing experiments. Stem pigmentation, red (R-) vs. green (rr), was used as a genetic marker in the estimation of outcrossing. Homozygous dominant and recessive genotypes of Jamaican Red and Jamaican Green, respectively, were grown in both of the planting arrangements and dates. Seeds from open-pollinated capsules of randomly selected Jamaican Green plants were planted to score the frequency of cross-pollination. Estimates of natural cross-pollination ranged from 0.20 ± 0.09% to 0.68 ± 0.34%. Roselle outcrosses at a low rate in Jamaica.
Roselle (Hibiscus Sabdariffa) Calyx Diet and Histopathological Changes in Liver of Albino Rats  [PDF]
A.O. Ojokoh
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition , 2006,
Abstract: Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) calyx was fermented with and without wood ash. The proximate composition revealed that the sample fermented without wood ash had the highest protein content of 14.7 2.5%. There was a significant decrease (P< 0.05) in the antinutrient content (phytate and tannin) with a reduction of between 1.21-1.32% in tannin and 488.8 3.7-827.3 3.7mg/100g in phytate. The unfermented sample had phytate and tannin of 2143.6 0.8mg/100g and 5.30 1.1% respectively. The effect of calyx diet on the morphology of the liver was investigated in albino rats. The results suggest that in high doses, roselle calyx may have some toxic effects on the liver. There was decrease in growth in albino rats on all the treatments except for the control diet where there was no increase in growth.
Hibiscus sabdariffa L., roselle calyx, from ethnobotany to pharmacology
Carvajal-Zarrabal O, Barradas-Dermitz DM, Orta-Flores Z, Hayward-Jones PM, Nolasco-Hipólito C, Aguilar-Uscanga MG, Miranda-Medina A, Bujang KB
Journal of Experimental Pharmacology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JEP.S27974
Abstract: iscus sabdariffa L., roselle calyx, from ethnobotany to pharmacology Review (3394) Total Article Views Authors: Carvajal-Zarrabal O, Barradas-Dermitz DM, Orta-Flores Z, Hayward-Jones PM, Nolasco-Hipólito C, Aguilar-Uscanga MG, Miranda-Medina A, Bujang KB Published Date February 2012 Volume 2012:4 Pages 25 - 39 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JEP.S27974 Received: 06 November 2011 Accepted: 23 November 2011 Published: 29 February 2012 Octavio Carvajal-Zarrabal1, Dulce María Barradas-Dermitz2, Zaida Orta-Flores2, Patricia Margaret Hayward-Jones1, Cirilo Nolasco-Hipólito3, M Guadalupe Aguilar-Uscanga2, Anilú Miranda-Medina2, Kopli Bin Bujang3 1University of Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico; 2Veracruz Institute of Technology, Veracruz, Mexico; 3University of Malaysia Sarawak, Kuching, Malaysia Abstract: Using MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases, a review of the literature from the pioneering study of 1991 until 2010 was performed on the effects on biological models of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. roselle calyx, its extracts mainly in polar solvents, or pure components found in extracts, as well as their possible relationship to these effects. Three relevant effects on lipid metabolism, antihypertensive activity, and apoptosis were observed. Our chronological review of the studies mentioned in the literature provides another opportunity to see how humans compile scientific knowledge of a chemical structure–physiological activity relationship starting from an ethnobotanical–ethnopharmagognosy contribution. The chemical components that are the main active principles in the physiological activities of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. calyx are anthocyanins and polyphenols (protocatechuic acid and quercetin). Advances have also been made in the elucidation of action mechanisms. Additionally, it has become clear that the lack of standardization in terms of chemical components of the material arising from Hibiscus sabdariffa L. used in testing on biological models imposes limits on the possibility of carrying out comparative analyses between studies. Fortunately, more recent studies are overcoming this obstacle by reporting component concentrations of assumed active principles; however, complete analysis of the extract, if this is to be considered as a therapeutic agent, is not commonly reported in the aforesaid studies. If one of the eventual scenarios for Hibiscus sabdariffa L. calyx is as a therapeutic agent in communities with economic limitations, then studies of a pharmacological nature should guarantee the effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of this material, which is widely accepted to be associated with chemical complexity, thus making this knowledge necessary.
Hibiscus sabdariffa L., roselle calyx, from ethnobotany to pharmacology
Carvajal-Zarrabal O,Barradas-Dermitz DM,Orta-Flores Z,Hayward-Jones PM
Journal of Experimental Pharmacology , 2012,
Abstract: Octavio Carvajal-Zarrabal1, Dulce María Barradas-Dermitz2, Zaida Orta-Flores2, Patricia Margaret Hayward-Jones1, Cirilo Nolasco-Hipólito3, M Guadalupe Aguilar-Uscanga2, Anilú Miranda-Medina2, Kopli Bin Bujang31University of Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico; 2Veracruz Institute of Technology, Veracruz, Mexico; 3University of Malaysia Sarawak, Kuching, MalaysiaAbstract: Using MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases, a review of the literature from the pioneering study of 1991 until 2010 was performed on the effects on biological models of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. roselle calyx, its extracts mainly in polar solvents, or pure components found in extracts, as well as their possible relationship to these effects. Three relevant effects on lipid metabolism, antihypertensive activity, and apoptosis were observed. Our chronological review of the studies mentioned in the literature provides another opportunity to see how humans compile scientific knowledge of a chemical structure–physiological activity relationship starting from an ethnobotanical–ethnopharmagognosy contribution. The chemical components that are the main active principles in the physiological activities of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. calyx are anthocyanins and polyphenols (protocatechuic acid and quercetin). Advances have also been made in the elucidation of action mechanisms. Additionally, it has become clear that the lack of standardization in terms of chemical components of the material arising from Hibiscus sabdariffa L. used in testing on biological models imposes limits on the possibility of carrying out comparative analyses between studies. Fortunately, more recent studies are overcoming this obstacle by reporting component concentrations of assumed active principles; however, complete analysis of the extract, if this is to be considered as a therapeutic agent, is not commonly reported in the aforesaid studies. If one of the eventual scenarios for Hibiscus sabdariffa L. calyx is as a therapeutic agent in communities with economic limitations, then studies of a pharmacological nature should guarantee the effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of this material, which is widely accepted to be associated with chemical complexity, thus making this knowledge necessary.Keywords: anthocyanins, phenolic, polyphenolic compounds, lipid metabolism, antihypertensive, apoptosis, safe effective herbal therapeutic product
Compositional Attributes of the Calyces of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.)
S.O. Babalola, A.O Babalola, O.C. Aworh
Journal of Food Technology in Africa , 2001,
Abstract: In this study, chemical and mineral composition of the calyces of green, red and dark red roselle were evaluated. There was no significant difference in crude protein of green (17.9%) and red (17.4%) coloured roselle calyces. Crude fibre (11.2%), ascorbic acid (86.5mg/100g) and sodium (9.5mg/100g) contents of green coloured calyx were significantly higher than other calyx samples. However, dark red calyx was significantly higher in ash (6.8%) and potassium (2320mg/100g) contents than the other two calyces. Also, there was no significant differences in calcium, magnesium and zinc contents of red and dark red coloured roselle calyces at P Roselle calyces appeared to be cheap source of vegetable protein, fat and minerals therefore its consumption should be encouraged. The Journal of Food Technology in Africa Volume 6 No.4, 2001, pp. 133-134 KEY WORDS: Roselle calyces, chemical analysis.
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