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Perceived nervousness and moodiness associated with increased CVD but not cancer morbidity in pre- and postmenopausal women. Observations from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden
Dominique Hange, Lauren Lissner, Calle Bengtsson, Valter Sundh, Cecilia Bj rkelund
International Journal of General Medicine , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S4894
Abstract: ceived nervousness and moodiness associated with increased CVD but not cancer morbidity in pre- and postmenopausal women. Observations from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden Original Research (3431) Total Article Views Authors: Dominique Hange, Lauren Lissner, Calle Bengtsson, Valter Sundh, Cecilia Bj rkelund Published Date March 2009 Volume 2009:2 Pages 39 - 45 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S4894 Dominique Hange, Lauren Lissner, Calle Bengtsson, Valter Sundh, Cecilia Bj rkelund Sahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: A 32-year prospective observational study was initiated in 1968, including 1462 women aged 60, 54, 50, 46, and 38, representative of the female population in these age groups. Measures included self-reported nervous symptoms and moodiness at baseline, menopausal status, risk factors as smoking, s-cholesterol, s-triglycerides, body mass index (BMI), waist–hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, and socioeconomic status (SES). The prevalence of nervousness and moodiness was investigated as well as if these reported symptoms could predict mortality and morbidity within 32 years in pre-and postmenopausal women. Women who reported at least two of the symptoms suffered from an increased risk of 32-year mortality, independent of all background variables described above (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.28, confidence interval [CI] 1.03–1.58). Women with only one of the nervous symptoms already had an increased risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) also after multivariable adjustment (HR = 1.29, CI 1.09–1.52) a risk that also remained significant when analyzing CVD risk in the group of premenopausal women (HR = 1.28, CI 1.02–1.62). There was no significantly increased risk among pre-or postmenopausal women with perceived nervousness/moodiness of developing cancer during the 32-year follow-up. There seems to be an association between nervousness/moodiness and premature mortality and morbidity in CVD, especially when present already in the premenopausal state in women.
Perceived nervousness and moodiness associated with increased CVD but not cancer morbidity in pre- and postmenopausal women. Observations from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden  [cached]
Dominique Hange,Lauren Lissner,Calle Bengtsson,Valter Sundh
International Journal of General Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Dominique Hange, Lauren Lissner, Calle Bengtsson, Valter Sundh, Cecilia Bj rkelundSahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: A 32-year prospective observational study was initiated in 1968, including 1462 women aged 60, 54, 50, 46, and 38, representative of the female population in these age groups. Measures included self-reported nervous symptoms and moodiness at baseline, menopausal status, risk factors as smoking, s-cholesterol, s-triglycerides, body mass index (BMI), waist–hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, and socioeconomic status (SES). The prevalence of nervousness and moodiness was investigated as well as if these reported symptoms could predict mortality and morbidity within 32 years in pre-and postmenopausal women. Women who reported at least two of the symptoms suffered from an increased risk of 32-year mortality, independent of all background variables described above (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.28, confidence interval [CI] 1.03–1.58). Women with only one of the nervous symptoms already had an increased risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) also after multivariable adjustment (HR = 1.29, CI 1.09–1.52) a risk that also remained significant when analyzing CVD risk in the group of premenopausal women (HR = 1.28, CI 1.02–1.62). There was no significantly increased risk among pre-or postmenopausal women with perceived nervousness/moodiness of developing cancer during the 32-year follow-up. There seems to be an association between nervousness/moodiness and premature mortality and morbidity in CVD, especially when present already in the premenopausal state in women.Keywords: Women, population study, nervousness, mortality, cardiovascular disease
Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in middle-aged men and women in Gothenburg, Sweden
Lennart Welin, Annika Adlerberth, Kenneth Caidahl, Henry Eriksson, Per-Olof Hansson, Saga Johansson, Annika Rosengren, Kurt Sv?rdsudd, Catharina Welin, Lars Wilhelmsen
BMC Public Health , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-403
Abstract: A random sample of men and women born in 1953 were examined in 2003–2004 for cardiovascular risk factors. Men born in 1943 and that participated in the examination in 1993 were also invited. Descriptive statistics were calculated.The participation rate among men and women born in 1953 was 60 and 67% respectively. Among men born in 1943, the participation rate was 87%. The prevalence of obesity was from 15 to 17% (body mass index, BMI ≥ 30) in the three samples. The prevalence of known diabetes was 4% among the 50-year-old men and 6% among the 60-year-old men, and 2% among the women. Increased fasting plasma glucose varied substantially from 4 to 33% depending on cut-off level and gender. Mean cholesterol was 5.4 to 5.5 mmol/l. Smoking was more common among women aged 50 (26%) than among men aged 50 (22%) and 60 years (15%). The prevalence of the MetSyn varied with the definition used: from 10 to 15.8% among the women, from 16.1 to 26% among 50-year-old men, and from 19.9 to 35% among the 60-year-old men. Only 5% of the men and women had no risk factors.This study provides up-to-date information about the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the MetSyn in middle-aged Swedish men and women. Different definitions of the MetSyn create confusion regarding which definition to use.Since the landmark Framingham Heart study in 1948 [1], there have been several hundred prospective cohort studies on cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors.In Gothenburg the first cohort of 50-year-old men (the Study of Men Born in 1913) was examined in 1963 [2]. Younger cohorts of 50-year-old men (i.e. men born in 1923, 1933, and 1943) have later been examined every 10th year [3-5].The present study adds new data by including the 5th cohort of 50-year-old men (men born in 1953). We have also examined 50-year-old women (born in 1953) in addition to a follow-up examination of the 4th cohort of 50-year-old men (born in 1943), now aged 60 years.With an increasing prevalence of e
Main causes of death among Swedish women born 1914 and 1918: 32-year follow-up of the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg  [cached]
Hange D,Sigurdsson JA,Björkelund C,Lapidus L
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Dominique Hange,1 Jóhann Ag Sigurdsson,2 Cecilia Bj rkelund,1 Leif Lapidus,3 Calle Bengtsson11Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Iceland and Centre of Development, Primary Health Care of the Capital Area, Reykjavík, Iceland; 3Institute of Medicine, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, SwedenBackground: Coronary heart disease has been reported to be the major cause of death of postmenopausal women in industrialized countries. The risk for women of dying from myocardial infarction is significantly greater than the risk of dying from cancer. The aim of this study was to compare previous observations regarding causes of death with the results from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg. We also examined how causes of deaths vary among different age cohorts.Methods: This follow-up report based on the prospective observational Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden was confined to mortality in two age cohorts: 180 women born in 1914 and 398 women born in 1918. These women were representative of the female population in Gothenburg in these age groups. Women were followed for 32 years, from 1968–1969 to 2000–2001. During the follow-up period, data on mortality were obtained from the population registry and the Cause of Death Register. Women’s death certificates were also examined.Results: In women aged between 60 and 80 years, cancer accounted for 30% of deaths, myocardial infarction for 19%, and stroke for 14%. In women who died after the age of 80 years, myocardial infarction was a more common cause of death than cancer.Conclusions: Cancer accounts for most years lost from a woman’s normal life span. Myocardial infarction was a more common cause of death than cancer only in women above the age of 80 years. Although myocardial infarction is a common cause of death among women, cancer is a more common cause of death at younger ages. This should be emphasized when planning care, prevention, and research involving women’s health.Keywords: causes of death, mortality, population study, women
Main causes of death among Swedish women born 1914 and 1918: 32-year follow-up of the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg
Hange D, Sigurdsson JA, Bj rkelund C, Lapidus L, Bengtsson C
International Journal of General Medicine , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S31748
Abstract: in causes of death among Swedish women born 1914 and 1918: 32-year follow-up of the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg Original Research (1333) Total Article Views Authors: Hange D, Sigurdsson JA, Bj rkelund C, Lapidus L, Bengtsson C Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 597 - 601 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S31748 Received: 13 March 2012 Accepted: 10 April 2012 Published: 12 July 2012 Dominique Hange,1 Jóhann Ag Sigurdsson,2 Cecilia Bj rkelund,1 Leif Lapidus,3 Calle Bengtsson1 1Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Iceland and Centre of Development, Primary Health Care of the Capital Area, Reykjavík, Iceland; 3Institute of Medicine, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Background: Coronary heart disease has been reported to be the major cause of death of postmenopausal women in industrialized countries. The risk for women of dying from myocardial infarction is significantly greater than the risk of dying from cancer. The aim of this study was to compare previous observations regarding causes of death with the results from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg. We also examined how causes of deaths vary among different age cohorts. Methods: This follow-up report based on the prospective observational Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden was confined to mortality in two age cohorts: 180 women born in 1914 and 398 women born in 1918. These women were representative of the female population in Gothenburg in these age groups. Women were followed for 32 years, from 1968–1969 to 2000–2001. During the follow-up period, data on mortality were obtained from the population registry and the Cause of Death Register. Women’s death certificates were also examined. Results: In women aged between 60 and 80 years, cancer accounted for 30% of deaths, myocardial infarction for 19%, and stroke for 14%. In women who died after the age of 80 years, myocardial infarction was a more common cause of death than cancer. Conclusions: Cancer accounts for most years lost from a woman’s normal life span. Myocardial infarction was a more common cause of death than cancer only in women above the age of 80 years. Although myocardial infarction is a common cause of death among women, cancer is a more common cause of death at younger ages. This should be emphasized when planning care, prevention, and research involving women’s health.
Oral health-related quality of life, sense of coherence and dental anxiety: An epidemiological cross-sectional study of middle-aged women
Ulla Wide Boman, Anette Wennstr?m, Ulrika Stenman, Magnus Hakeberg
BMC Oral Health , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6831-12-14
Abstract: The study had a cross-sectional design and included 500 randomly selected women in Gothenburg, Sweden, 38 and 50?years of age, from health examinations in 2004–05. The survey included questionnaires covering global questions concerning socio-economic status, oral health/function and dental care behaviour, and tests of oral health-related quality of life, sense of coherence, and dental anxiety.High dental anxiety and low sense of coherence predicted low oral health-related quality of life. In addition, socioeconomic status as measured by income, perceived oral functional status as captured by chewing ability and self-reported susceptibility to periodontal disease were also important predictors of oral health-related quality of life.Dental anxiety and sense of coherence had an inverse relationship with regard to oral health-related quality of life. These associations were stronger than other risk factors for low oral health-related quality of life.
Association between Ambient Temperature and Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospitalisations in Gothenburg, Sweden: 1985–2010  [PDF]
Janine Wichmann, Annika Rosengren, Karin Sj?berg, Lars Barregard, Gerd Sallsten
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0062059
Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death globally and evidence is steadily increasing on the role of non-traditional risk factors such as meteorology and air pollution. Nevertheless, many research gaps remain, such as the association between these non-traditional risk factors and subtypes of CVD, such as acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The objective of this study was to investigate the association between daily ambient temperature and AMI hospitalisations using a case-crossover design in Gothenburg, Sweden (1985–2010). A secondary analysis was also performed for out-of-hospital ischemic heart disease (IHD) deaths. Susceptible groups by age and sex were explored. The entire year as well as the warm (April?September) and cold periods (October–March) were considered. In total 28 215 AMI hospitalisations (of 22 475 people) and 21 082 out-of-hospital IHD deaths occurred during the 26-year study period. A linear exposure-response corresponding to a 3% and 7% decrease in AMI hospitalisations was observed for an inter-quartile range (IQR) increase in the 2-day cumulative average of temperature during the entire year (11°C) and the warm period (6°C), respectively, with and without adjustment for PM10, NO2, NOx or O3. No heat waves occurred during the warm period. No evidence of an association in the cold period nor any association between temperature and IHD deaths in the entire year, warm or cold periods - with and without adjusting for PM10, NO2, NOx or O3 was found. No susceptible groups, based on age or sex, were identified either. The inverse association between temperature and AMI hospitalisations (entire year and warm period) in Gothenburg is in accordance with the majority of the few other studies that investigated this subtype of CVD.
Flood Resilient Cities: A Syntactic and Metric Novel on Measuring the Resilience of Cities against Flooding, Gothenburg, Sweden  [PDF]
Ehsan Abshirini, Daniel Koch, Ann Legeby
Journal of Geographic Information System (JGIS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jgis.2017.95032
Abstract: Flooding is one of the most destructive natural disasters which have rapidly been growing in frequency and intensity all over the world. In this view, assessment of the resilience of the city against such disturbances is of high necessity in order to significantly mitigate the disaster effects of flooding on the city structures and the human lives. The aim of this paper is to develop a method to assess the resilience of a river city (the city of Gothenburg in Sweden), which is prone to flood Hazard, against such disturbances. By simulating flood inundation with different return periods, in the first step, the areas of impact are determined. To assess the resilience, two different methods are followed. One is a syntactic method grounded in the foreground network in space syntax theory and the other is based on measuring accessibility to the essential amenities in the city. In the first method, similarity and sameness parameters are defined to quantitatively measure the syntactic resilience in the city. In the next step, accessibility to amenities and the minimum distance to amenities before and after each disturbance is measured. The results, in general, show that such disturbances affect the city structure and the resilience of the city differently. For instance, the city is more resilient after flooding according to accessibility measures. This clearly means that the answer to the question of resilience is mainly dependent on “resilience of what and for what.”
Psychosomatic complaints and sense of coherence among adolescents in a county in Sweden: a cross-sectional school survey
Bo Simonsson, Kent W Nilsson, Jerzy Leppert, Vinod K Diwan
BioPsychoSocial Medicine , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1751-0759-2-4
Abstract: A cross-sectional school survey in the county of V?stmanland, Sweden. All 16- and 19-year old adolescents present at school on the day of the survey were asked to complete a questionnaire in their classrooms during a one-lesson hour session under the supervision of their teachers. Totally 3,998 students in both private and public schools, studying in ninth grade elementary school or third grade secondary school participated.The results from our study show that there is a statistically significant relation between PSC and SOC among adolescents. It also shows that adolescents with a weak SOC score have more symptoms of PSC.Our study indicates that SOC can help the adolescents to choose a coping strategy that is appropriate for the situation and thereby may prevent them from developing PSC. However, additional studies are needed to confirm our findings.The major causes of mortality and morbidity among adolescents have, during the last decades, shifted from infectious to behavioural aetiologies [1]. This shift is mostly due to risk taking behaviours among adolescents that lead to, among others, injuries and drug and alcohol misuse [2]. Mental health problems are also common among young people. The mental health problems can range from fully developed psychiatric diseases to learning disabilities, behavioural problems in school, speech- and language problems and psychosomatic complaints (PSC) [3]. To better understand the development of psychosomatic complaints among adolescents, it was decided to perform a population-based study, which is to our knowledge, the first to examine the relation between PSC and sense of coherence (SOC) among adolescents.The symptoms of psychosomatic disorders usually begin during adolescence or early adulthood and are characterised by many vague physical complaints. Any part of the body may be affected, although the symptoms and their frequencies vary. Common symptoms among adolescents are headaches, nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, diarr
Iron biogeochemistry across marine systems at changing times – conclusions from the workshop held in Gothenburg, Sweden (14–16 May 2008)  [PDF]
E. Breitbarth,E. P. Achterberg,M. V. Ardelan,A. R. Baker
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2009,
Abstract: Based on an international workshop (Gothenburg, 14–16 May 2008), this review article aims to combine interdisciplinary knowledge from coastal and open ocean research on iron biogeochemistry. The major scientific findings of the past decade are structured into sections on natural and artificial iron fertilization, iron inputs into coastal and estuarine systems, colloidal iron and organic matter, and biological processes. Potential effects of global climate change, particularly ocean acidification, on iron biogeochemistry are discussed. The findings are synthesized into recommendations for future research areas.
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